Texas Senate

Bill would end tickets for school tomfoolery | Bud Kennedy | Fort Worth, Arlington, Northeast…

In Azle, police ticketed a ninth-grader playing touch football.

His crime: Blurting a bad word.

In Granbury, officers hauled a tuba player into court and fined him $550.

Why?

He told a crude joke in the band hall.

And then there was the Great Longview Gas Bust.

Police ticketed an elementary school boy.

His offense: A loud bodily emission.

The days of embarrassing and wasteful police work will end if the Texas House passes a bill by a senator from Dallas.

After hearing how police and courtroom resources have been wasted on trivial citations that shove students into the juvenile justice system, the Texas Senate voted unanimously Thursday to end schoolhouse tickets for Class C misdemeanors.

No more juvenile delinquency charges against students for shoving. Or writing on a wall. Or chewing gum. Or tossing the wrapper.

No more school officials delivering grandiose pronouncements the way former Azle Superintendent Santo Forte did in 1996.

“If you come to my school and you start cussing,” he said, “you’re going to have to pay.”

via Bill would end tickets for school tomfoolery | Bud Kennedy | Fort Worth, Arlington, Northeast….

 

In Texas, Police in Schools Criminalize 300.000 Each Year | ChildreninPrison

In Texas, hundreds of thousands of students are winding up in court for committing very serious offenses such as cursing or farting in class. Some of these so-called dangerous criminals (also known as teenagers) will face arrest and even incarceration, like the honors student who spent a night in jail [3] for skipping class, or the 12-year-old who was arrested for spraying perfume on her neck [4]. These cases have at least one thing in common in that they were carried out by special police officers walking a controversial beat: the hallways and classrooms of public schools.

via In Texas, Police in Schools Criminalize 300.000 Each Year | ChildreninPrison.