sexism

Remembering the Life, Love and Legacy of Audre Lorde | Irene Monroe

Huffington Post Blogger, , reminds us of Audre Lorde’s struggles and many contributions to womanist theory. Lorde pioneered the appreciation for African American womanhood and motherhood through poetry, essays, and living a life well served.

Remembering the Life, Love and Legacy of Audre Lorde | Irene Monroe

Excerpt:

Lorde was shaping contemporary feminist and womanist thought well before her seminal 1984 book, Sister Outsider, a collection of speeches and essays unflinchingly depicting black lesbian women’s lives as interlocking oppressions — sexism, racism, ageism, homophobia, and classism — and a clarion call for change and activism:

As a Black, lesbian, feminist, socialist, poet, mother of two including one boy and member of an interracial couple, I usually find myself part of some group in which the majority defines me as deviant, difficult, inferior or just plain “wrong.” From my membership in all of these groups I have learned that oppression and the intolerance of difference come in all shapes and sizes and colors and sexualities; and that among those of us who share the goals of liberation and a workable future for our children, there can be no hierarchies of oppression.

Among scholars and activists today, Lorde’s depiction of “hierarchies of oppression” is lauded as an important theory on intersectionality.

via Remembering the Life, Love and Legacy of Audre Lorde | Irene Monroe.

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Latina, at the white, male New York Times: “Why are people thinking it’s OK to say racist sh-t in front of me?” – Salon.com

DAISY HERNÁNDEZ

Mr. Flaco is curious to hear what I might want to write about a new report showing that boys are being left behind in education. Nervous, I stumble through my pitch about how it’s not all boys.It is black boys and teenagers. “Racism,” I begin, “has, you know, shaped the expectations the kids have of themselves and that teachers have of them.”“What’s going to be your recommendation?” he asks, a smile dancing at his lips. “Tell teachers to raise their self-esteem?”

via Latina, at the white, male New York Times: “Why are people thinking it’s OK to say racist sh-t in front of me?” – Salon.com.

Network News Shows Ignore House GOP Failure To Reauthorize Violence Against Women Act | Research | Media Matters for America

Network News Shows Ignore House GOP Failure To Reauthorize Violence Against Women Act | Research | Media Matters for America.

House Republicans Failed To Pass Senate’s Reauthorization Of VAWA. The Huffington Post reported that the Violence Against Women Act expired on January 2 after House Republican leadership failed to bring the already-passed Senate version of the bill up for a vote:

Despite a late-stage intervention by Vice President Joe Biden, House Republican leaders failed to advance the Senate’s 2012 reauthorization of the Violence Against Women Act, an embattled bill that would have extended domestic violence protections to 30 million LGBT individuals, undocumented immigrants and Native American women.

[…]

 

Alienated Conclusions: What If Black Women Were White Women?

Alienated Conclusions: What If Black Women Were White Women?.

White female features would be declared violent. Their “jagged” thin lips, “knife sharp” noses, and “harsh” jaw lines would be nature’s way of expressing why men have a natural preference for the soft features of black women. Soft lips, soft cheekbones, and soft, round noses would be proof of natural femininity. Full, pink lips and large, dark eyes would become associated with virginal black girls whose purity must not be compromised. Black female features would thus be said to represent youth.