protests

As Riots Follow Freddie Gray’s Death in Baltimore, Calls for Calm Ring Hollow | The Atlantic

Social commentator, Ta-Nehisi Coates, weighs in on the environmental injustice plaguing his hometown.  Baltimore 4/27/2015

When nonviolence is preached as an attempt to evade the repercussions of political brutality, it betrays itself. When nonviolence begins halfway through the war with the aggressor calling time out, it exposes itself as a ruse. When nonviolence is preached by the representatives of the state, while the state doles out heaps of violence to its citizens, it reveals itself to be a con. And none of this can mean that rioting or violence is “correct” or “wise,” any more than a forest fire can be “correct” or “wise.” Wisdom isn’t the point tonight. Disrespect is. In this case, disrespect for the hollow law and failed order that so regularly disrespects the rioters themselves.

via As Riots Follow Freddie Gray’s Death in Baltimore, Calls for Calm Ring Hollow – The Atlantic.

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WNYT.com – On first night of Hanukkah, ‘Jewish Voices for Peace’ take stand against police violence


“Hanukkah is a victory of the few against the many,” said Rabbi Deborah Gordon.

Protesters say the meaning of Hanukkah also represents the fight of black people against what they call an unfair justice system.

“Black people in this country have been particularly singled out and targeted for police violence and police brutality and we all need to come together to say that that is not acceptable,” said Mark Mishler.

“I have four kids. Three of them are black,” said Rabbi Gordon, who says the protest is personal. “We’re part of a little tiny group that’s been discriminated against in many places over millennia so this is something we know about and there’s a historical alliance between black folks and Jews in the United States from 50 years ago that in some ways we’re trying to renew.”

via WNYT.com – On first night of Hanukkah, ‘Jewish Voices for Peace’ take stand against police violence.

Browns WR Andrew Hawkins on wearing protest T-shirt: My heart was in the right place. | #OYRchallenge

Andrew Hawkins, Cleveland Browns, NFL

On Monday, Hawkins gathered media in the locker and spoke without notes.

He said:

“I was taught that justice is a right that every American should have. Also justice should be the goal of every American. I think that’s what makes this country. To me, justice means the innocent should be found innocent. It means that those who do wrong should get their due punishment. Ultimately, it means fair treatment. So a call for justice shouldn’t offend or disrespect anybody. A call for justice shouldn’t warrant an apology.

“To clarify, I utterly respect and appreciate every police officer that protects and serves all of us with honesty, integrity and the right way. And I don’t think those kind of officers should be offended by what I did. My mom taught me my entire life to respect law enforcement. I have family, close friends that are incredible police officers and I tell them all the time how they are much braver than me for it. So my wearing a T-shirt wasn’t a stance against every police officer or every police department. My wearing the T-shirt was a stance against wrong individuals doing the wrong thing for the wrong reasons to innocent people.

“Unfortunately, my mom also taught me just as there are good police officers, there are some not-so-good police officers that would assume the worst of me without knowing anything about me for reasons I can’t control. She taught me to be careful and be on the lookout for those not-so-good police officers because they could potentially do me harm and most times without consequences. Those are the police officers that should be offended.

“Being a police officer takes bravery. And I understand that they’re put in difficult positions and have to make those snap decisions. As a football player, I know a little bit about snap decisions, obviously on an extremely lesser and non-comparative scale, because when a police officer makes a snap decision, it’s literally a matter of life and death. That’s hard a situation to be in. But if the wrong decision is made, based on pre-conceived notions or the wrong motives, I believe there should be consequence. Because without consequence, naturally the magnitude of the snap decisions is lessened, whether consciously or unconsciously.

“I’m not an activist, in any way, shape or form. Ninety-nine times out of a hundred I keep my opinions to myself on most matters. I worked extremely hard to build and keep my reputation especially here in Ohio, and by most accounts I’ve done a solid job of decently building a good name. Before I made the decision to wear the T-shirt, I understood I was putting that reputation in jeopardy to some of those people who wouldn’t necessarily agree with my perspective. I understood there was going to be backlash, and that scared me, honestly. But deep down I felt like it was the right thing to do. If I was to run away from what I felt in my soul was the right thing to do, that would make me a coward, and I can’t live with that. God wouldn’t be able to put me where I am today, as far as I’ve come in life, if I was a coward.

“As you well know, and it’s well documented, I have a 2-year-old little boy. The same 2-year-old little boy that everyone said was cute when I jokingly threw him out of the house earlier this year. That little boy is my entire world. And the No. 1 reason for me wearing the T-shirt was the thought of what happened to Tamir Rice happening to my little Austin scares the living hell out of me. And my heart was broken for the parents of Tamir and John Crawford knowing they had to live that nightmare of a reality.

“So, like I said, I made the conscious decision to wear the T-shirt. I felt like my heart was in the right place. I’m at peace with it and those that disagree with me, this is America, everyone has the right to their first amendment rights. Those who support me, I appreciate your support. But at the same time, support the causes and the people and the injustices that you feel strongly about. Stand up for them. Speak up for them. No matter what it is because that’s what America’s about and that’s what this country was founded on.”

via ESPNCleveland.com

In demanding apologies, police unions show white supremacy is a core value | #OYRchallenge

Andrew Hawkins, NFL

While the overwhelming majority of African Americans see some level of racial discrimination and devaluing of black life in the police murders of unarmed men like Akai Gurley, Kendrec McDade, and Eric Garner, it’s become far too easy for police (and society) to deny race played even a small role in any of these homicides.

In essence, unless the police are recorded using the “n-word” or secretly walking out of a Klan meeting, they can effectively deny they have a racist bone in their body, but that’s not really how the new racism works in 2014. Racial slurs and Klan meetings are used less, but some reputable polls show the majority of Americans still hold some level of racist views against African Americans. Yet we’re expected to believe that those racist views are somehow never held by police and never play any role in the deaths of African Americans they kill by the hundreds year in and year out.

via In demanding apologies, police unions show white supremacy is a core value.

United Nations Peacekeeper Soldiers Fire on Protestors in Haiti | #OYRchallenge

Haitian protesters attacked by United Nations peacekeeping forces. Notice that protesters are young unarmed men, demonstrating peacefully as is being done all over the globe.
 
Haiti revolution 12/13/2014

Haitian police and UN peacekeepers have attacked protesters with live ammo and chemical agents as several thousand opposition supporters tried to march on the presidential palace, demanding new leadership.

UN peacekeepers firing on Haitian protesters on 12/13/2014 as they protest for a new government leader.

via United Nations Peacekeeper Soldiers Fire on Protestors in Haiti.

3 lessons from hip-hop history every activist should know – YouTube | Jay Smooth

Published on Nov 18, 2014

This is our new bimonthly video series, The Illipsis, written, starring and produced by DJ, video essayist and cultural critic Jay Smooth.In this first episode, Jay deconstructs the history of hip-hop to illuminate how young activists can continue challenging and reshaping the status quo today.

via 3 lessons from hip-hop history every activist should know – YouTube.

It’s Time to Act on the Climate Crisis | #OYRchallenge

World’s largest climate change rally takes over streets of NYC

Climate Change Cyclist ride from NYC to New Haven

It’s Time to Act on the Climate Crisis.

A panel on the urgency of climate change moderated by WNYC’s Brian Lehrer and featuring authors Chris Hedges and Naomi Klein, 350.org founder Bill McKibben and Seattle Council member Kshama Sawant, with an opening speech by Senator Bernie Sanders. –   September 21, 2014

– These Kids Are About To Charge The Chicago Police Dept. With Genocide At The United Nations VIDEO | #OYRchallenge

The charge of Genocide has been levied upon various countries across the globe. We watch the horrors broadcast on American television, and we return to our lives without recognizing the historical genocide attempted against African Americans in the US. The United States refused to sign the UN Convention on Social and Economic Equality. Mike Brown was sacrificed, but his life will now have meaning as the question of national genocide by authorities is no longer a question. The children are fighting for their lives. The UN is their only hope. Support them in their efforts. The ultimate #OYRchallenge
via – These Kids Are About To Charge The Chicago Police Dept. With Genocide At The United Nations VIDEO.

A group of youth social justice leaders plan to go to Geneva, Switzerland this November to deliver testimony about the experiences of young people, people of color and other marginalized communities who face targeted violence by police in the Chicago area.The grass-roots group who call themselves, We Charge Genocide, will speak before the United Nations Against Torture. Their name comes from a petition that was delivered to the United Nations in 1951. Using stories and data from their Youth Hearing On Police Violence the delegates where they will speak out against the crimes against humanity that  are the norm for minority groups in Chicago and across the nation.

Hands Up United #Handsup #OYRchallenge

There is now a name for the Ferguson, MO alliance against the murder of Black bodies, Hands Up, Inc. Hands up? Yes, because it may be the last position anyone sees you in before you die. 

Want to offer your professional services? Watch the video, then register at http://www.handsupunited.org/ #handsup #justiceformikebrown #OYRchallengeJustice for Mike Brown

Purpose: “We are striving for a world where we deal with harm in our communities through healing, love, and kinship.  This means an end to state sponsored violence, including the excessive use of force by law enforcement.  We are committed to an America that comes to terms with the trauma of its painful history and finds true reconciliation for it.  Mass incarceration and the criminalization of black and brown people must forever end, leaving in its place a culture that embraces our histories and stories.  This means an end to racial bias and white supremacy in all its forms.” #JusticeforMikeBrown #Handsup #OYRchallenge

via Hands Up United.

Trayvon Martin Protests and the Misdirection of the Racially Showcased

Black outrage over the racist injustice system that allowed killer George Zimmerman walk free is being misdirected by the usual suspects but now the Slave-Ship-Hop rapper Jay Z is trying to associate himself with social justice movements when most of his musical career he has been engaged in promoting negative behavior. Who knows what the true motives are of the racially showcased weapons of mass confusion who exists as social controls. Don’t be fooled, keep your third eye open.