OYRchallenge

Latest Mike Brown Shooting Video – Hands Up| The Free Thought Project| #OYRchallenge

via ‘He had his f**king hands in the air!’ New footage shows Ferguson witnesses reacting to teen’s death | The Free Thought Project.


Their account aligns with what other witnesses have said: that Brown’s hands were raised in the air when he was killed.The contractors said they did not see how the incident began.The video was filmed on a cellphone by an unidentified witness, CNN reported.

How to Start a Homeschool Co-op for Black Homeschoolers. | #OYRchallenge

Homeschooling or private education has been thrown negative bones in this century. Yet, I remember when it was the hopes of many for their children to receive a healthy private education. While growing up in the 1960’s New York City, private education was sought after by wealthy and middle-class families. Even some poor families did without so that their children could receive premium educations. The news of protesters advocating for public education often uncovers connections to teachers unions and government organizations. Few show any sincerity, besides platitudes, for the general welfare of our African children. The statistics and news reports of violence against our children while in their care supports this. Disparaging slurs and rehearsed talking points on African American progress, news, and education further highlights the need for African American children to be educated in an African-friendly environment.  And I say this because????

Dr. Samori Camara invests in socializing African children within their culture, with the current advancements in the American society. He also recognizes the necessity for them to utilize the talents of those of like minds in the rudimentary subject matters and expanded materials. This initiative is not just for African children; it is done all over the world, by many communities, ethnicities, and religions. We still live in a system where the wealthy may choose how and by who their children will be educated, yet the poor are hounded when trying to privately educate their children. Poverty imprisons our children to learn from those who do not respect or appreciate us.

Today, we are urged by teacher’s unions, who are by-the-way champions of race discrimination in public schools, to support public education. Data is collected on failed private entities, such as some Charter Schools, to support their ragged claims to the ignorant that public education is best for our children. Not so. Our inner city public schools are a mess of calculations, re-designations, social manipulations, and traps to keep our African American communities helpless and hopeless.

Private education is best for the entire family and community. Parents and other involved adults are now responsible to forward their own education in order to supply their students and children with the most current and diverse education available, while fostering positive images of their culture and communities. Teachers are family members, friends, and local talent. Families are not sending their children off to robotics class to learn “how to work for someone else,” but are learning to seek out and appreciate their own talents within their communities.

Families I encounter on trips to libraries, seminars, workshops, and entertainment venues, take these opportunities to expand their children’s education. Education is a life experience, 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. You pay your principal, therefore he or she listens to your concerns. If you are homeschooling, concerns are addressed within your community. Your family’s life journey does not end on Friday at 3:00 pm. So why should its education begin with someone else. #OYRchallenge

Education for Liberation: The Top 20 Questions and Answers for Black Homeschoolers by Dr. Samori Camara Get it here:

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BEL8IK8

Afrikan centered homeschooling is on the rise, but we should definitely not do it alone. A cooperative can help with your Black homeschool endeavors. In the video, I cover some of the benefits. They are many more. Watch, share, subscribe.

Revolutionary Love,

Dr. Samori Camara

Town of Eatonville Florida

Eatonville, Florida

On August 18, 1887, only ten years removed from Reconstruction 1863-1877, a group of twenty-seven Negro men led by Joe Clark convened with the purpose of founding, what would turn out to be, the first incorporated African American settlement community in the United States. Eatonville, the town born on that day, was named for a White man, Josiah Eaton, who served as mayor of the neighboring town of Maitland from which most of the future Eatonville residents originated.

via Town of Eatonville Florida.

Racial Microaggressions in Everyday Life | Psychology Today #OYRchallenge

Derald Wing Sue, Ph.D

Racial microaggressions are the brief and everyday slights, insults, indignities and denigrating messages sent to people of color by well-intentioned White people who are unaware of the hidden messages being communicated. These messages may be sent verbally “You speak good English.”, nonverbally clutching one’s purse more tightly or environmentally symbols like the confederate flag or using American Indian mascots. Such communications are usually outside the level of conscious awareness of perpetrators. In the case of the flight attendant, I am sure that she believed she was acting with the best of intentions and probably felt aghast that someone would accuse her of such a horrendous act.

via Racial Microaggressions in Everyday Life | Psychology Today.

Encouraging Young Girls To Be Happy With Their Hair | MadameNoire #OYRchallenge

Visiting a sister claiming the Natural Hair generation came as a great surprise when on a trip to her bathroom proved her most false. The shelves, lined with cosmetics, included several boxes of chemical and quasi-natural texturizers. Even more surprising was her consistent head swivels, while noting how tight her younger daughter’s curls are compared to the looser-curled older sister.

Conversations such as these throw me head first into the bowl, but considering some of the most disturbing behavior to seeing African hair at its natural has come from African American women in social media – I simply shook my head. Gabby Douglas and Beyonce’s baby daughter took almost more hits in social media than mass incarceration and a failing public education system among young African American women. This begs the question, is natural hair a new fad that will scurry into the fabric of America after the revolution, as dashiki’s of the 1960’s and 70’s, or are African American women having a tough time weaning off of the creamy-crackAfrican American girls

Girls and women should know and be able to easily recall the texture of their natural hair. It’s disheartening to hear a woman say she doesn’t know her true hair texture because she has kept up with a choice that was made by someone else to alter her hair many years ago as a child. It’s just another way of quietly stripping away the person she is by permanently changing her look and by taking away her choice. There is no reason a girl at six or seven years old needs a ‘treatment’ for her hair with all the information out there now about how to care for natural hair of a wide variety of textures.

via Encouraging Young Girls To Be Happy With Their Hair | MadameNoire.

Outrage and Calls for Change Follow Ferguson Officials Into Council Meeting – NYTimes.com | #OYRchallenge

Ferguson holds its first city council meeting since the murder of an 18-year-old African American youth, Mike Brown. The Ferguson murder is one of many attacks on African American men across the United States. Is this the tipping point for African American families? In the context of media, political, social, and judicial scrambles to maintain anti-African American rhetoric and stereotypes, there is the most salient issue. How will African Americans redress the age old virus spread across America?  After all of the protests, will African American leadership sink back into the muddy American political pool, as they did after the Civil Rights Era? Or, will our young develop new substantive strategies, educators, and alliances out of this new surge of African American awakening? #OYRchallenge

Ferguson, MO first city council meeting after Mike Brown murder

New York Times: Residents pelted the stone-faced officials with angry questions: Why had Darren Wilson, a white Ferguson officer who shot the unarmed black teenager on Aug. 9, not been arrested? Why were young African-American men so frequently arrested by the police? And why were so few black residents elected to city government?

“The world will little note nor long remember what we say here, but it can never forget what they did here. It is for us, the living, rather to be dedicated here to the unfinished work which they who fought here have thus far so nobly advanced. It is rather for us to be here dedicated to the great task remaining before us: That from these honored dead we take increased devotion to that cause for which they gave the last full measure of devotion; that we here highly resolve that these dead shall not have died in vain; that this nation…shall have a new birth of freedom; and that government of the people, by the people, and for the people shall not perish from the earth.”  Abraham Lincoln, Gettysburg Address

via Outrage and Calls for Change Follow Ferguson Officials Into Council Meeting – NYTimes.com. #OYR challenge

Take the OYR Challenge #OYRchallenge

Hey, White America, You Need To Hear What These Ferguson Kids Have To Say | #Ferguson #OYRchallenge

Hey, White America, You Need To Hear What These Ferguson Kids Have To Say    #Ferguson Kids #OYRchallenge

 

Join the cause.  (Courtesy of FCKH8Sporting charity benefit T-shirts that read “Racism Is Not Over. But I’m Over Racism.” these kids from #Ferguson are helping raise funds for five different anti-racism causes. For every tee or hoodie sold at

http://FCKH8.com $5 is donated to make a difference (details @ http://FCKH8.com) with the bold tees that make a statement starting at $13. 

Join the cause @ http://FCKH8.com

Take the OYR Challenge. #OYRchallenge

Hands Up United #Handsup #OYRchallenge

There is now a name for the Ferguson, MO alliance against the murder of Black bodies, Hands Up, Inc. Hands up? Yes, because it may be the last position anyone sees you in before you die. 

Want to offer your professional services? Watch the video, then register at http://www.handsupunited.org/ #handsup #justiceformikebrown #OYRchallengeJustice for Mike Brown

Purpose: “We are striving for a world where we deal with harm in our communities through healing, love, and kinship.  This means an end to state sponsored violence, including the excessive use of force by law enforcement.  We are committed to an America that comes to terms with the trauma of its painful history and finds true reconciliation for it.  Mass incarceration and the criminalization of black and brown people must forever end, leaving in its place a culture that embraces our histories and stories.  This means an end to racial bias and white supremacy in all its forms.” #JusticeforMikeBrown #Handsup #OYRchallenge

via Hands Up United.

How Trayvon Martin’s Death Launched a New Generation of Black Activism | The Nation

A new brand of activism is sweeping the country following the murder of Trayvon Martin. Is the ‘old African American guard’ being pushed aside in the rush of young men taking abusive municipalities to task. History is taking a turn away from silencing rhetoric to an era of talk, talk, and more talk among our young. #OYRchallenge

The Nation

A group of 100 black activists, ranging in age from 18 to 35, had gathered in Chicago that same weekend. They had come together at the invitation of Cathy J. Cohen, a professor of political science at the University of Chicago and the author of Democracy Remixed: Black Youth and the Future of American Politics, and her organization, the Black Youth Project. Launched in 2004, the group was born as a research project to study African-American youth; in the decade since then, Cohen has turned the BYP into an activist organization. The plan for this meeting was to discuss movement building beyond electoral politics. Young black voters turned out in record numbers in the 2008 and ‘12 elections: 55 percent of black 18-to-24-year-olds voted in 2008, an 8 percent increase from 2004, and while a somewhat smaller number—49 percent—voted in 2012, they still outpaced their white counterparts. But how would young black voters hold those they had put in office accountable? And what were their demands?

via How Trayvon Martin’s Death Launched a New Generation of Black Activism | The Nation.