Mississippi

A Black Mississippi Judge’s Breathtaking Speech To Three White Murderers : Code Switch : NPR

Walton goes on to explain that “there is something different about Mississippi; something almost unspeakably primal and vicious; something savage unleashed there that has yet to come to rest.” To prove his point, he notes that, “[o]f the 40 martyrs whose names are inscribed in the national Civil Rights Memorial in Montgomery, AL, 19 were killed in Mississippi.” “How was it,” Walton asks, “that half who died did so in one state?” — My Mississippi, Your Mississippi and Our Mississippi.

via A Black Mississippi Judge’s Breathtaking Speech To Three White Murderers : Code Switch : NPR.

Advertisements

Addicting Info – Former Mississippi Republican State Senator Switches To Democratic Party Because Of Obamacare (VIDEO)

Mississippi State Senator Tim Johnson has just jumped ship from the Republican Party. On top of that, he also announced in a press conference held last Wednesday that he will run for Lt. Governor of Mississippi in the next election. He cites failure to accept a five million dollars from the federal government as part of the Medicaid Expansion component of Obamacare as a major part of his reason for leaving the party.

via Addicting Info – Former Mississippi Republican State Senator Switches To Democratic Party Because Of Obamacare (VIDEO).

Tragedy and Art: The Power of Sam Cooke’s ‘A Change Is Gonna Come’ | Robert F. Darden | #OYRchallenge

This article gives background information on Sam Cooke’s motivation in creating, A Change Is Gonna Come. In the midst of the Civil Rights struggle and desegregation, our artist continued the tradition of slave hymns and field songs, ushering in hope through the darkest of times. #OYRchallenge.

On the surface, “A Change is Gonna Come” doesn’t sound particularly challenging, especially in light of the defiant freedom songs that rocked the movement in 1964, “Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me ‘Round” or “I Got My Mind Stayed on Freedom.” The song was finally released as a single in late December of that year, shortly after Cooke’s untimely death. It quickly became one of the anthems of the movement and music historian Dave Marsh said that “A Change is Gonna Come” “ranks with Martin Luther King’s best speeches as a verbal encapsulation of the changes black perspective underwent in the Sixties.”

Despite surface appearances, African-American teenagers and movement activists knew exactly what it meant. The lyrics speak of a universally understood sense of alienation in their own land, of being treated as second-class citizens, of asking for help — and not receiving it, even from their own people. And like the great protest spirituals, even when recounting the grossest injustices, the singer continually returns to the hope, the expectation of justice: “Oh, there been times that I thought I couldn’t last for long/But now I think I’m able to carry on/It’s been a long, a long time coming/But I know a change is gonna come, oh yes it will.”

via Tragedy and Art: The Power of Sam Cooke’s ‘A Change Is Gonna Come’ | Robert F. Darden.

Somebody “Fixin’ to be Killed” – A review of We Will Shoot Back: Armed Resistance in the Mississippi Freedom Movement | Freedom Road Socialist Organization / Organización Socialista del Camino para la Libertad

UMOJA

Most of us have heard about the legendary Deacons for Defense. Through exhaustive research and interviews, Umoja introduced us to many other unsung heroes and sheroes (although not surprising the historical documentation was scant on women’s contribution to armed resistance in the south). Men and women like Hartman Turnbow, Rudy Shields, Robert “Fat Daddy” Davis, C.O.Chin, Ora “Miss Dago” Bryant, Luella Hazelwood and many more. Their inspirational stories affirmed that black folks stood with dignity, unflinchingly looking in the face of pure hatred and forged on to re-define their futures.

via Somebody “Fixin’ to be Killed” – A review of We Will Shoot Back: Armed Resistance in the Mississippi Freedom Movement | Freedom Road Socialist Organization / Organización Socialista del Camino para la Libertad.

I had to brutally murder the black gay guy because he hit on me

Ah Mississippi. It seems like only last week we were discussing Mississippi having just outlawed slavery 148 years late, and being the last state on the list to pass the 19th Amendment giving women the right to vote. And then, what do you know – a black gay man who was running for mayor of a Mississippi town, Marco McMillian, is found brutally murdered, but the suspect, Lawrence Reed, says he had to do it because, you see, the gay guy hit on him.

Oh the number of men who would be dead if they were beaten to death every time they hit on a woman.

via I had to brutally murder the black gay guy because he hit on me.

 

Mississippi Officially Abolishes Slavery, Ratifies 13th Amendment – ABC News

Two medical school colleagues, one an immigrant from India, the other a life-long Mississippian, joined forces to resolve a historical oversight that until this month had never officially been corrected.

The oversight was no small one either. Until February 7, 2013, the state of Mississippi had never submitted the required documentation to ratify the Thirteenth Amendment, meaning it never officially had abolished slavery.

The  amendment was adopted in December 1865 after the necessary three-fourths of the then 36 states voted in favor of ratification.  Mississippi, however, was a holdout; at the time state lawmakers were upset that they had not been compensated for the value of freed slaves.

via Mississippi Officially Abolishes Slavery, Ratifies 13th Amendment – ABC News.

Dateline Finding’s Booker’s Place Part 2

Filmmaker Frank De Fellita recalls the dangerous atmosphere he encountered in 1960s Mississippi and meeting Booker Wright, the unassuming waiter who became central to his film.