media

Trevor Noah, The Daily Show, Salon Reviewer Gets It Right | Habari Gani, America!

Salon published a spot on critique of The Daily Show’s new host, Trevor Noah, written by Matt Carotenuto. The article, “Trevor Noah schools racists: “The Daily Show” has an essential new mission and comic voice” should not be taken lightly by any reader. Carotenuto explains the relevance of one who is African and in a power-filled American position. Noah has the ability to have a far-reaching impact on our culture with his comedic voice.

Noah, a South African native, now holds one of the most powerful seats – American main media. He cued his audience in the video advertisement previous to his first show. Social media posted various comments to this video, but the actual symbolism seemed to be lost on the average viewer.

Trevor Noah’s first week as host of the Daily Show showed the promise of someone who will educate America, not only about Africa – but about who we are as Americans beyond the punchlines. I pictured some avid Daily Show viewer in their living room shouting, “Who does he think he is?” This was most evident in Noah’s interview with Governor of New Jersey, Chris Christie.

In Daily Show style, Noah began to interview Christie about the politics of his state. Christie tried the “Be careful, I can get to you Black Boy,” inference only to be met with the “Annndd???” gaze. So Noah is the man to maintain his static professionalism and self-awareness in the face of what we in America denote as White Privilege and political might, characteristics he might pass on to the American viewer.

As a Daily Show correspondent, Noah’s brief segments on Africa were palatable only because those who were not culturally educated could yawn their way through it. As the host, Noah sits center stage formulating material for a culture starved and resistant American audience as well as the culturally aware. This tight high profile comedic balance was first achieved by Bert Williams in the early 1900’s, where Williams’ crafty monologues and scenes with his partner George Walker spoke to white and black audiences simultaneous and apart. It was said that at some shows, it was noticeable that whites would roar with laughter in some instances, while Blacks at others; each drawing their own coded messages from the verse. Noah would be smart to study this design.

In reading this article, I found a kindred spirit in Matt Carotenuto. We will both sit on the edge of our seats each night pulling threads, shaking our fist, and hopefully formulating more articles – Noah worthy.


Excerpt:

As a teacher/scholar of African studies, I was delighted when South African Trevor Noah was announced as the replacement for Jon Stewart. Drawing from his complex mixed-race heritage and experience growing up in apartheid era South Africa, Noah is a great candidate to critique America’s single stereotypical story of Africa as a place of merely violence, disease and poverty.

Source: Trevor Noah schools racists: “The Daily Show” has an essential new mission and comic voice – Salon.com

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Trevor Noah turns African stereotypes on America – This Is Africa | #OYRchallenge

 Appearing on the the hit American satirical news show, The Daily Show, South African comedian Trevor Noah, spoke with the host, Jon Stewart about his anxiety around visiting the United States

It actually is quite silly but, if you really think about it, most of the stuff Trevor Noah highlights here has a touch of truth with it.

Using current affairs as a point of comic departure, Noah, expresses his fear of American police, comparing them to the brutal apartheid police of the old South Africa. With sharp irony, he also launches an offensive on the US’s attitude to Ebola ‘in Africa’ (stating a funny but true fact about Ebola statistics between South Africa & the US). And, of course, what would current affairs comedy be without a jab at Bob Geldof’s silly Band Aid 30 initiative.

via Trevor Noah turns African stereotypes on America – This Is Africa.

Do Black People Have Equal Gun Rights? – NYTimes.com | #OYRchallenge

Gunrights

The Cheetum family in Doerun, Ga., in 1950. Credit Bettmann/Corbis

There was a question posed to an African American group opposed to gun rights in America. “If your entire block died from drinking too much Kool-Aid, would your next electoral platform be to ban Kool-Aid from the open market in America?”

CONVENTIONAL wisdom holds that firearms are the preserve of conservative white men. You would never know this at my local shooting range, which happens to be in a majority African-American area, and has a clientele that reflects that fact. There, as a white man, I’m often in the minority; just one more guy who likes to fire weapons — another person to chat to and share stories with. It is, I’d venture, how things should be.

via Do Black People Have Equal Gun Rights? – NYTimes.com.

Darren Wilson Likely to Avoid Civil Rights Charges in Michael Brown Killing

Ferguson, August 2014

Activists and protesters in the Ferguson area are starting to get a feeling that a non-indictment is coming soon. The perception isn’t just coming from the length of the grand jury hearing or the notion that McCulloch is unable to be objective when it comes to investigating law enforcement. Much of that perception is coming from what is seen as the local media’s attempt lately to change the narrative regarding law enforcement and the protesters. Specifically, stories run by the St. Louis Post-Dispatch and the major local news stations where they’ve tried to frame protesters as violent and dangerous while also trying to portray local police in a more positive light. Essentially, they are trying to give the moral high ground to the police ahead of the likely scenario where Wilson is allowed to walk.

via Darren Wilson Likely to Avoid Civil Rights Charges in Michael Brown Killing.

Black Women Need More Outlets And Options For Their Stories To Be Told – The Root

From Left of Black:

Despite many news programs featuring African-American women as on-air hosts—Joy Reid of MSNBC’s The Reid Report, Robin Roberts on ABC’s Good Morning America, Gwen Ifill anchoring PBS Newshour and Michel Martin helming NPR’s Tell Me More, to name a few—there are still far too few people of color, particularly black women, in executive, editorial and production positions who have the decision-making authority to promote stories in ways that reflect the concerns of our communities.

via Black Women Need More Outlets And Options For Their Stories To Be Told – The Root.

Slavery in the Chocolate Industry

Uploaded on Jan 23, 2011
Although slavery is no longer legal there are still millions of people living in slavery today. One place and industry where slaves still exist is the cocoa industry. This documentary takes a deeper look at that industry with disturbing and challenging eyes.

Dozens Wounded in China School Knife Attack: It’s Time to Ban Sharp Objects

 

Ban all tools and weapons?

Ban all tools and weapons?

Dozens Wounded in China School Knife Attack: It’s Time to Ban Sharp Objects
When gun control legislation is put into place, every gun in the civilization does not disappear; they are not thrown into some magical vortex where they will never be seen again.
Those guns aren’t destroyed, and they are certainly not “controlled”, they are simply moved. They are taken from millions of individuals and placed in the hands of one group.