Jim Crow

Mike Brown’s shooting and Jim Crow lynchings have too much in common. It’s time for America to own up | Isabel Wilkerson | Comment is free | theguardian.com | #OYRchallenge

Ferguson Lynching

At left: Ferguson, Missouri, 2014, where a body was left in the street for four hours in the August sun. At right: Paris, Texas, 1893. Photographs: JB Forbes / St Louis Post-Dispatch via AP; Wikimedia Commons

the guardian photo

Not terribly long ago in a country that many people misremember, if they knew it at all, a black person was killed in public every four days for often the most mundane of infractions, or rather accusation of infractions – for taking a hog, making boastful remarks, for stealing 75 cents. For the most banal of missteps, the penalty could be an hours-long spectacle of torture and lynching. No trial, no jury, no judge, no appeal. Now, well into a new century, as a family in Ferguson, Missouri, buries yet another American teenager killed at the hands of authorities, the rate of police killings of black Americans is nearly the same as the rate of lynchings in the early decades of the 20th century.

 

via Mike Brown’s shooting and Jim Crow lynchings have too much in common. It’s time for America to own up | Isabel Wilkerson | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

New Racism Museum Reveals the Ugly Truth Behind Aunt Jemima – Jennie Rothenberg Gritz – The Atlantic

You’ve said that Americans would rather talk about slavery than Jim Crow. Why?The most obvious reason is that there are no former slaves walking amongst us. Some of the people who lived during the Jim Crow period are still alive. That’s the first answer.But the other answer is that for a lot of Americans, it’s easier to admit that slavery existed. They have a really sanitized vision of slavery anyhow. But whatever it was, it’s over. Jim Crow, in many ways, is not over. The laws are gone, but the repercussions are still around. Looking at these images begs the question: How far are we from this now?

via New Racism Museum Reveals the Ugly Truth Behind Aunt Jemima – Jennie Rothenberg Gritz – The Atlantic.

Darron T. Smith, Ph.D.: The Responsibility to End Racism

Darron T. Smith, Ph.D.White racism is a systemic phenomenon that is deeply woven in the fabric of our society and has a corrosive effect on the minds, bodies and souls of all Americans, including white people. Dealing justly with American racism means that white Americans must come to terms with the historical legacy of inequality inherited from their forbears. This means partaking in a thorough review of the United States as a nation founded (in part) on racist principles. We tend to underestimate the impact of systemic white racism, rationalizing it as an individual affair rather than a system of oppression involving 246 years of slavery and 90 years of Jim Crow for roughly 85 percent of our existence as a nation.

via Darron T. Smith, Ph.D.: The Responsibility to End Racism.