#ICantBreathe

#BlackLivesMatter: the birth of a new civil rights movement | World news | The Guardian

When the Florida courts handed down the verdict freeing George Zimmerman for the death of young Trayvon Martin, there was little response from those in my locale, from those near enough for me to judge the impact on our cities in Upstate New York. Our problems flash. We are startled, and then we return to nothingness. I thought, “Wow. What heartless beasts we have become.” Still, I kept up with subsequent news articles on social media and reposted as many articles as I could find on Trayvon, his family, even the lunacies of Zimmerman. Alicia Garza of  Black Lives Matter helped me to understand that what I determined to be coldness was a slow rising unfathomable fear. Garza, her husband, and another couple were at a bar when she heard the news. She tells “The Guardian:”

“Everything went quiet, everything and everyone,” Garza says now. “And then people started to leave en masse. The one thing I remember from that evening, other than crying myself to sleep that night, was the way in which as a black person, I felt incredibly vulnerable, incredibly exposed and incredibly enraged. Seeing these black people leaving the bar, and it was like we couldn’t look at each other. We were carrying this burden around with us every day: of racism and white supremacy. It was a verdict that said: black people are not safe in America.”

#BlackLivesMatter: the birth of a new civil rights movement | World news | The Guardian

Elizabeth Day’s article on the history of the Black Lives Matter, so far, tells a few stories. The changing face of Black activism such as appropriating spaces and audiences once held captive by main mass media outlets, the agile network of local activist working together nationally, power shifting from convention conservative leadership to the masses, and utilizing social media hashtags to create forums and meeting houses.

Samuel Sinyangwe, Black Lives Matter data guru states:

“We have been holding a mirror up to the nation. And we’ve shown what has been going on for a very long time: that we are being brutalised. That the state is being violent against us… The nation is now aware of the problem. Whether we can agree on a solution or not is another question but at least they acknowledge something is going on and that’s a great first step.”

But what happens after that first step? Zuckerman warns that although social media can give the illusion of empowerment, it also runs the risk of diverting attention away from the knottier problems of longer-lasting policy change.

“We’re at a moment where trust in our major institutions is at an all-time low,” he says. “When you start losing trust in those institutions, you start losing your ability to change things. Social media is a place where people feel they can move the wheel, and they’re right – they can change the representation of a gun victim in mainstream media. They can build momentum around removing the Confederate flag. But the fear is that it might be harder to make these much bigger structural changes in education or wage policy or to have a conversation about our gun culture.”

Read the entire article at The Guardian via #BlackLivesMatter: the birth of a new civil rights movement | World news | The Guardian.

Eric Casebolt: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know | Heavy.com

McKinney, TX 2015

A McKinney, Texas, cop has been placed on administrative leave while his department investigates his actions in a video that shows him cursing at juveniles, violently detaining a 15-year-old girl and pointing his gun at two unarmed teens at a community pool party.

He has been identified as Corporal Eric Casebolt, a 40-year-old Navy veteran who has been an officer in McKinney for nearly 10 years, according to Fox 4 News.

Casebolt is white, while the teens he is seen arresting and yelling expletives at are black.

The video, posted to YouTube, went viral on social media, prompting police to review it and put Casebolt on leave. The incident happened Friday, June 5 and he was suspended Sunday.

via Eric Casebolt: 5 Fast Facts You Need to Know | Heavy.com.

Dear, Al Sharpton – YouTube| Urban Cusp | Oogee Woogee

Published on Dec 31, 2014

Oogee Woogee’s message to the Civil Rights Leader, Al Sharpton. ( Additional footage found from Al Jazeera, MSNBC, BET, Rolling Stone ) Music by DMX – Change Gonna Come ( Prod by Swizz Beatz ) ***NO COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT INTENDED***

via Dear, Al Sharpton – YouTube.

Why We Can’t Wait (Signet Classics): Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. | #OYRchallenge

Why We Can’t Wait by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

mlkwhywait

Letter from Birmingham Jail, April 16, 1963

“Perhaps it is easy for those who have never felt the stinging darts of segregation to say, ‘Wait.’ But when you have seen vicious mobs lynch your mothers and fathers at will and drown your sisters and brothers at whim…when you see the vast majority of twenty million Negro brothers smothering in an airtight cage of poverty in the midst of an affluent society; when you suddenly find your tongue twisted and your speech stammering as you seek to explain to your six-year-old daughter why she can’t go to the public amusement park that has just been advertised on television, and see tears welling up in her eyes when she is told that Funtown is closed to colored children, and see ominous clouds of inferiority beginning to form in her little mental sky…when you take a cross-country drive and find it necessary to sleep night after night in the uncomfortable corners of your automobile because no motel will accept you…when…your wife and mother are never given the respected title ‘Mrs.’…when you are forever fighting a degenerating sense of ‘nobodiness’—then you will understand why we find it difficult to wait. There comes a time when the cup of endurance runs over, and men are no longer willing to be plunged into the abyss of despair.”

Why We Can’t Wait 

Martin Luther King’s Classic Exploration of the events and forces behind the Civil Rights Movement

The Eric Garner Verdict: Analyses, Implications and What Comes Next – YouTube | #OYRchallenge

There has been a stiffening silence in African American homes of late. There is no language to bridge anguish, fear, and cognitive dissonance into language appropriate to educate, parent, and resolve going out the next day into the mirage of Americanism.  We avert our gaze when mistakenly another broadcast of protesters flicker across our television sets. Teacher’s College hopes to teach us to exhale through this silence. The panel assembled expressed the need to provide breathing space for race dialogue. Watch the video. #ICantBreathe #BlackLivesMatter

Streamed live on Dec 11, 2014

Panel Discussion and Teachers College Community dialogue to take seriously the question of what comes next here at Teachers College in the wake of the Eric Garner and Michael Brown non-indictments. Featuring Professors Chris Emdin, Yolanda Sealey-Ruiz, and doctoral student and poet Jamila Lyiscott.

via The Eric Garner Verdict: Analyses, Implications and What Comes Next – YouTube.