Harlem

Challenge | Barbershop Books

Harlem has always been the east coast mecca for Black culture and art. I remember my days at Hunter College, trolling the uptown bookstores for that rare author. With this tradition Alvin Irby‘s project, Barbershop Boys, recognizes and meets the challenges that prevent young Black youth from developing a healthy love for books.   

NBC Today: How Barbershop Books Is Getting Young Boys Excited About Reading

In 2013, former kindergarten and first-grade teacher Alvin Irby launched “Barbershop Books,” an initiative that targets young black boys who frequent barbershops and aims to improve their reading comprehension by encouraging them to dive into the world of literature. 

The Barbershop Books website describes its purpose: “To close the reading gap for young black boys by using child-centered, culturally relevant, and high-impact strategies.” According to the White House, 86 percent of black boys are below proficient reading levels by the fourth grade, compared to 58 percent of white boys in the same category. 

 

Barbershop Books

via Challenge | Barbershop Books.

Great Explorers – Harlem! | Indiegogo | #OYRchallenge

Middle Passage, New York is running a program, Great Explorers Cultural Arts and Literacy Program , engaging students to research their history in America. This research will be utilized by students to create scripts, dance, and other art & performance medium under the guidance of professional artist, writers, and choreographers.

How can you help? Simple donation in support of this program allows you to aid this progressive program, purchase materials, create strong minds, and attend performances and cast party. A win win! #OYRchallenge

The Great Explorers Cultural Arts and Literacy Program  is run by Middle Passage, Inc., a nonprofit organization working to educate children of color in New York City,  in particular, students who feel alienated in traditional schools with their emphasis on high-stakes testing, a foreign cultural environment and a curriculum that fails to meet the needs of a diverse group of students. 

In all our programs, we emphasize Project Based Learning so that families, teachers and community members can work together to help children develop both critical thinking and problem-solving skills — skills that set them up for a lifetime of success and achievement!

via Great Explorers – Harlem! | Indiegogo.

Miracle In Harlem (1948)

From ‘The Riverbends Channel’
Published on Mar 26, 2012
Julie Weston and her aunt, Hattie, own and operate a candy-store in Harlem. A wealthy business man, Albert Marshall, and his wayward son, Jim Marshall, swindle the women out of the store. Later, Albert Marshall is found murdered, and there are several suspects, including Marshall’s secretary and a blackmailer. – Summary written by Les Adams (longhorn1939@suddenlink.net).

Cast (IMDB): Sheila Guyse as Julie Weston; Stepin Fetchit as Swifty’, the Handyman; Hilda Offley as Aunt Hattie; Creighton Thompson as Reverend Jackson; Kenneth Freeman as Jim Marshall; William Greaves as Bert Hallam; Sybil Lewis as Alice Adams (as Sybyl Lewis); Laurence Criner as Albert Marshall (as Lawrence Criner); Jack Carter as Philip Manley; Milton Williams as Mr. Wilkinson; Monte Hawley as Lieutenant Renard; Ruble Blakey as Detective Foley; Slick’ Chester as Detective Tracy (as Alfred Chester); Savannah Churchill as Singer – Specialty ‘I Want to Be Loved’; Lavada Carter as Singer – Specialty ‘John Saw the Number’; Norma Shepherd as Singer – Specialty ‘Patience and Fortitude’; Juanita Hall as Juanita Hall – Specialty ‘Chocolate Candy Blues’; Lynn Proctor Trio as Trio; Lynn Proctor as Lynn Proctor; Juanita Hall Choir as Choir; Hilda Geeley as Singer (uncredited).

Why Are NYPD Cops Setting Up Criminal Checkpoints For Kids Who Are Late to School?

“There are a number of issues, both morally and legally, with these truancy stops. The first question is why kids are stopped at all when they are obviously en route to school? Doesn’t stopping them only make them later for school? Isn’t tardiness something that’s best handled by schools, anyway? And, according to allthingsharlem, there is an officer at every school, so why aren’t in-school officials charged with dealing with this? Lastly, what happens to the data that cops collect from these kids? Is it maintained in some database? Why?”