Ferguson decision

Killer cops, drone wars and the crisis of democracy – Salon.com

2014 violence

Racism and its close cousin xenophobia are ingredients baked into the slave morality that afflicts so many white Americans, feeding a persecution complex and a sense of permanent aggrievement among the most historically privileged demographic group on the planet. (Yes, there are millions of poor whites, and they have good reason to lament their marginal, forgotten status. They also have a strong tendency to look for enemies in the wrong places.) Crime is at or near all-time lows, employment is high, many consumer goods are cheaper than ever before and the United States has not experienced a major attack by foreign terrorists in 13 years. Given all that, it is crucial to conceal the real source of middle-class and working-class America’s worsening anomie: the vast gulf of inequality between the super-rich and the rest of us, along with the stagnant wages, declining benefits and longer work weeks confronted by ordinary people.

As the black radical philosopher Frantz Fanon observed in the early 1960s, racism becomes a tool in the hands of the masters, used to pit different sectors of the oppressed against each other. He was talking about the European working class and its reluctance to join forces with the anti-colonial struggle in Africa, but we face a version of the same problem today. This week I watched an eerie and powerful new collage film from Swedish documentarian Göran Hugo Olsson called “Concerning Violence,” which is inspired by Fanon’s revolutionary classic “The Wretched of the Earth” (a book not as far away from Nietzsche as you might suppose). The film is an essayistic and aphoristic assemblage of archival footage from the ‘60s, ‘70s and ‘80s, opening a window onto various episodes from that little-understood and profoundly important period of post-colonial and anti-colonial history in Africa. But it also struck me as a distorted mirror reflecting our own situation, which has elements of internal colonialism (with respect to the poorest elements of our population), and an external neo-colonialism, although held at a great distance and largely invisible.

via Killer cops, drone wars and the crisis of democracy – Salon.com.

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The Illipsis: on Ferguson, riots and human limits – YouTube | #OYRchallenge

Published on Nov 26, 2014

In this second installment of The Illipsis, Jay Smooth looks back at the week’s events in Ferguson and asks how we can truly apply Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr’s advice that “riots are the language of the unheard.”

via The Illipsis: on Ferguson, riots and human limits – YouTube.

What It Takes To Convict A Killer Cop

What It Takes To Convict A Killer Cop

TPM wrote that police have an extra layer of legal protection from the Supreme Court, which ruled in 1989 that officers’ actions “must be judged from the perspective of a reasonable officer on the scene,” and that the “calculus must embody an allowance for the fact that police officers are often forced to make split-second decisions about the amount of force necessary in a particular situation.”

via What It Takes To Convict A Killer Cop.