Environmental Justice

The Unspoken Response to Black Lives Matter vs Black on Black Crime and Other Maladies Black | Habari Gani, America!

A worthy read is “Nobody: Casualties of America’s War on the Vulnerable, from Ferguson to Flint and Beyond” by Marc Lamont Hill, Morehouse University professor and new addition to the morning radio show the “Breakfast Club.”

In an interviewMarc Lamont Hill for AOL BUILD, Hill said it. Within the few minutes allowed, he said what many of the socially conscious are thinking when sidelined from the Black Lives Matter agenda with the discussion of Black on Black crime and Black disobedience.  Hill states that “People who even if they don’t get killed by state violence through the form of bullets, they’re still committed to … slow death row – the death of poverty…

I  read at least five newspapers per day. Electronic media allows not only the authors response to a situation, but included are the public responses as well. From the death of Trayvon Martin in February 2012 to the more recent deaths of Alton Sterling and Philandro Castile, journalist and public commentators spoke within the confines of police and victim, prejudice and privilege, law and order. The policy driven isolation and destruction of Black economy creating targets of Black men and women never came into focus during these discussions – until now.

Before we continue our discussions of policy and practice, read “Nobody: Casualties of America’s War on the Vulnerable, from Ferguson to Flint and Beyond.”

View a snippet of Marc Lamont Hills AOL interview here at NewBlackMan (in Exile):

Source: Marc Lamont Hill Talks New Book ‘Nobody: Casualties of America’s War on the Vulnerable…’ | NewBlackMan (in Exile)

Noam Chomsky: How America’s Way of Thinking About the World Naturally Produces Human Catastrophes | Alternet

Tavis Smiley interviews Noam Chomsky. In this article, Alternet lists him as a linguist, but he is so much more. Chomsky’s study of linguistics or studying the methodology and origin of language has given  him a broader understanding of how the world works.  

via Noam Chomsky: How America’s Way of Thinking About the World Naturally Produces Human Catastrophes | Alternet.
If the earth is a sphere–think about this–if the earth is a sphere and we’re constanAlternettly in motion, what is to be gained by drawing consistently certain countries on the top half and other countries on the bottom half? What is to be gained by that?

Chomsky: What’s to be gained by that is a graphic representation of the fact that we are more important and better than them. We’re the north, they’re the south. We dominate because of our essential superiority of character, qualities, righteousness and so on.

It’s a graphic manifestation of the we are better than them conception that, as I said, is unfortunately pretty natural and is greatly enhanced by when it’s associated with power. So when you actually dominate others, that enhances the natural we are better than them conceptions.

Bryant Gumbel: ‘My Son Was Arrested for Walking While Black’ (Aug. 6, 2015) | Charlie Rose

Bryant Gumbel to Charlie Rose:

“It’s like, NO! Stop! Stop! This has nothing to do with the victims. This has everything to do with the culture of demeaning a person of color. And… and there is no justification for society where my son has a far greater chance of being stopped, held, killed than your son.”

Bryant Gumbel‘s statements in this video isolated the main point of the #BlackLivesMatter movement away from the detracting “blame the victim” or the personal claims of those in communities with a lesser chance of experiencing institutional brutalities en masse.

Social Media has been ravaged with videos, memes, and postings decrying #BlackLivesMatter with Black on Black crime scenarios. We would expect this backlash from the ignorant and racist poor counterculture. Sadly, however, some Black individuals, too ignorant of the separation in discourse, have also hijacked the same rhetoric, not realizing its self-deprecating and dangerous implications.

Whites killing Whites, Hispanics killing Hispanics, Blacks killing Blacks, Europeans killing Europeans, and Africans killing Africans need their own hashtags. They are not to be commingled into a conversation which is politically, visually, and academically set apart to be addressed. In other words, if you are so concerned about the amount of violence in your ethnicity, race, class, or gender, study it, write about it, encapsulate it to the point that when those outside of that intra-conversation attempt to open their mouths, their breaths are as starved as their brains for lack of oxygen.

Published on Aug 6, 2015

via Bryant Gumbel: ‘My Son Was Arrested for Walking While Black’ (Aug. 6, 2015) | Charlie Rose – YouTube.

Falling in Love with the Work of Black British Filmmaker Cecile Emeke | ForHarriet

Cecile Emeke

Cecile Emeke, courtesy of ForHarriet.com

I grew up listening to stories of greatness in the Caribbean seas. My formal education is in American culture. I often wondered why I trip over photos of MLKing everywhere, while Sir Cuthbert Montraville Sebastian of St. Kitts, my childhood hero, is seldom noticed. Thank you, #ForHarriet. #Cecile Emeke

Excerpt:

There is a large number of people who feel as though the focal point of black activism and black success is and has always been centred on Black Americans. With powerful Black American men and women from Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Angela Davis, to Barack Obama and Oprah Winfrey inspiring black individuals from around the world, people forget about the complexities of Black life and experiences outside of the U.S. Trying to put together a similar list of powerful Black British men is difficult. And to trying to compile a list of powerful Black British women even more so.

via Falling in Love with the Work of Black British Filmmaker Cecile Emeke.

Why Marcus Garvey’s Teachings Are as Important Today as They Were in His Time – Atlanta Blackstar

Marcus Garvey

Despite the legislation which emanated from the Civil Rights Movement, Black people are not free and they have no power, including power over their own communities.  The larger society will not employ us, but they will imprison us, as they have by the multitudes, separating our families and destroying our communities, as we are used as raw materials for the prison factories.

And whether by the police, the courts, or vigilantes, this society continues to kill Black women, children and men—in the streets, in the police car, in the jail house and elsewhere, all because we have no power, and they know it.

via Why Marcus Garvey’s Teachings Are as Important Today as They Were in His Time – Atlanta Blackstar.

DC Comics Superman

Superman Comic Just Took On Police Brutality In a Big Way | Counter Current News

DC Comics revamps its Superman character to fit into the new American landscape. Superman takes on police brutality with the help of artist Aaron Kuder and colorist Tomeu Morey.

Excerpt from Counter Current News article:

By the end of the new “Action Comics” #41, a block party for Superman is disrupted by police in riot gear.

Superman Comic Just Took On Police Brutality In a Big Way

The onus is now shifting to a balance more reflected in the Constitution. The accusations of law enforcement are now being met with suspicion and skepticism, and with more and more cops caught on video behaving badly, the public is starting to wake up to the fact that the police have been treating people of some backgrounds, groups and classes very differently than others.

Now, a huge indication of that change in the social barometer is one of DC Entertainment’s big comic revamps this summer. In the revamp, most of Superman’s powers are gone — but he’s still superhuman, and basically still big as hell.

via Superman Comic Just Took On Police Brutality In a Big Way.

Black Love | The Culture

“Black Americana” Seeks To Deconstruct Negative Stereotypes About Black Love |The Culture

Featured in The Culture, “Black Love”

Black Love | The Culture

Black Americana” is a project aiming to deconstruct negative stereotypes through redefining and “reappropriating” relics of black americana. The goal of this first installment, says artist Tanisha Pyron, is to explore the dynamics between black women and men at various points in the African-American historical timeline. “[We’re] looking to quantify and establish what it took for one black man to love one black woman in the past and what it takes now and cast vision for it will take generations to come,” she writes.

To learn more about “Black Americana”, check out their Facebook page. Take a peek at some of the photos from this first installment below!

via “Black Americana” Seeks To Deconstruct Negative Stereotypes About Black Love.

#BlackLivesMatter: the birth of a new civil rights movement | World news | The Guardian

When the Florida courts handed down the verdict freeing George Zimmerman for the death of young Trayvon Martin, there was little response from those in my locale, from those near enough for me to judge the impact on our cities in Upstate New York. Our problems flash. We are startled, and then we return to nothingness. I thought, “Wow. What heartless beasts we have become.” Still, I kept up with subsequent news articles on social media and reposted as many articles as I could find on Trayvon, his family, even the lunacies of Zimmerman. Alicia Garza of  Black Lives Matter helped me to understand that what I determined to be coldness was a slow rising unfathomable fear. Garza, her husband, and another couple were at a bar when she heard the news. She tells “The Guardian:”

“Everything went quiet, everything and everyone,” Garza says now. “And then people started to leave en masse. The one thing I remember from that evening, other than crying myself to sleep that night, was the way in which as a black person, I felt incredibly vulnerable, incredibly exposed and incredibly enraged. Seeing these black people leaving the bar, and it was like we couldn’t look at each other. We were carrying this burden around with us every day: of racism and white supremacy. It was a verdict that said: black people are not safe in America.”

#BlackLivesMatter: the birth of a new civil rights movement | World news | The Guardian

Elizabeth Day’s article on the history of the Black Lives Matter, so far, tells a few stories. The changing face of Black activism such as appropriating spaces and audiences once held captive by main mass media outlets, the agile network of local activist working together nationally, power shifting from convention conservative leadership to the masses, and utilizing social media hashtags to create forums and meeting houses.

Samuel Sinyangwe, Black Lives Matter data guru states:

“We have been holding a mirror up to the nation. And we’ve shown what has been going on for a very long time: that we are being brutalised. That the state is being violent against us… The nation is now aware of the problem. Whether we can agree on a solution or not is another question but at least they acknowledge something is going on and that’s a great first step.”

But what happens after that first step? Zuckerman warns that although social media can give the illusion of empowerment, it also runs the risk of diverting attention away from the knottier problems of longer-lasting policy change.

“We’re at a moment where trust in our major institutions is at an all-time low,” he says. “When you start losing trust in those institutions, you start losing your ability to change things. Social media is a place where people feel they can move the wheel, and they’re right – they can change the representation of a gun victim in mainstream media. They can build momentum around removing the Confederate flag. But the fear is that it might be harder to make these much bigger structural changes in education or wage policy or to have a conversation about our gun culture.”

Read the entire article at The Guardian via #BlackLivesMatter: the birth of a new civil rights movement | World news | The Guardian.

Martin Luther King on the Dream & the Nightmare – #JusticeOrElse – YouTube

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr’sI Have A Dream” speech and all of his peace-filled sermons are treasured tools of the American race catalog. They are the slices of King’s life that please us most. The problem with this is the same with all great leaders, – men grow up over time. All leaders eventually face realities beyond the heart and those realities are the ones of nightmares. Martin Luther King, Jr had those same revelations in the last years of his life, a secret heavily under guard.

Published on Jul 16, 2015

Minister Louis Farrakhan has advised all to study the last speeches of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and to reflect on the evolution of his message—from one of an integrationist “Dreamer” in 1963, to one of a true wide-awake revolutionary in 1968 when he was murdered.

 

T. Coates|New Yorker Mag 2015

Ta-Nehisi Coates and a Generation Waking Up – The New Yorker

Brit Bennett’s review of “Between the World and Me” by Ta-Nehisi Coates, for The New Yorker magazine, is the best I have read so far. Bennett writes from an African American Feminist perspective drawing clean lines between what it means to be black and female in America. You can expect classy and exact references examining the relationship of black authors to black women, the black father to his son, and their relationship within the scope of institutional racism.

My favorite paragraph from Bennett is as follows:

 As a child, I once heard that slavery was worse for black men than black women, because black men were pained by their inability to protect the women they loved. In this retelling, black women’s pain is incidental. The systemic, relentless rape that black women endured is only meaningful because of how it hurt black men. I believed this for a time, in deference to the black elder who told me, until I realized that trauma is not a competition, that there is no better or worse; there is only pain, and a woman’s pain is equally worthy of mourning.T. Coates|New Yorker Mag 2015

Bennett’s piece opens:

The night Trayvon Martin’s killer walked free, I stood outside a Los Angeles movie theater, in line to watch “Fruitvale Station.” Maybe I would’ve picked a different movie had I foreseen the verdict, but I was young and hopeful, and I believed that someone would be held accountable for snuffing out a seventeen-year-old’s life. Instead, I blinked back tears as a well-meaning white woman approached—she couldn’t believe that verdict, she said, the injustice of it all. I didn’t want to hear her disappointment. I didn’t want to be a conduit for her guilt. I wanted to understand how a jury could determine that a child’s unarmed black body posed more of a threat than a grown man with a gun.

via Ta-Nehisi Coates and a Generation Waking Up – The New Yorker.