culture

Trevor Noah, The Daily Show, Salon Reviewer Gets It Right | Habari Gani, America!

Salon published a spot on critique of The Daily Show’s new host, Trevor Noah, written by Matt Carotenuto. The article, “Trevor Noah schools racists: “The Daily Show” has an essential new mission and comic voice” should not be taken lightly by any reader. Carotenuto explains the relevance of one who is African and in a power-filled American position. Noah has the ability to have a far-reaching impact on our culture with his comedic voice.

Noah, a South African native, now holds one of the most powerful seats – American main media. He cued his audience in the video advertisement previous to his first show. Social media posted various comments to this video, but the actual symbolism seemed to be lost on the average viewer.

Trevor Noah’s first week as host of the Daily Show showed the promise of someone who will educate America, not only about Africa – but about who we are as Americans beyond the punchlines. I pictured some avid Daily Show viewer in their living room shouting, “Who does he think he is?” This was most evident in Noah’s interview with Governor of New Jersey, Chris Christie.

In Daily Show style, Noah began to interview Christie about the politics of his state. Christie tried the “Be careful, I can get to you Black Boy,” inference only to be met with the “Annndd???” gaze. So Noah is the man to maintain his static professionalism and self-awareness in the face of what we in America denote as White Privilege and political might, characteristics he might pass on to the American viewer.

As a Daily Show correspondent, Noah’s brief segments on Africa were palatable only because those who were not culturally educated could yawn their way through it. As the host, Noah sits center stage formulating material for a culture starved and resistant American audience as well as the culturally aware. This tight high profile comedic balance was first achieved by Bert Williams in the early 1900’s, where Williams’ crafty monologues and scenes with his partner George Walker spoke to white and black audiences simultaneous and apart. It was said that at some shows, it was noticeable that whites would roar with laughter in some instances, while Blacks at others; each drawing their own coded messages from the verse. Noah would be smart to study this design.

In reading this article, I found a kindred spirit in Matt Carotenuto. We will both sit on the edge of our seats each night pulling threads, shaking our fist, and hopefully formulating more articles – Noah worthy.


Excerpt:

As a teacher/scholar of African studies, I was delighted when South African Trevor Noah was announced as the replacement for Jon Stewart. Drawing from his complex mixed-race heritage and experience growing up in apartheid era South Africa, Noah is a great candidate to critique America’s single stereotypical story of Africa as a place of merely violence, disease and poverty.

Source: Trevor Noah schools racists: “The Daily Show” has an essential new mission and comic voice – Salon.com

Black Americans Wearing African Clothing Is NOT Cultural Appropriation | Our Legaci

Source: Black Americans Wearing African Clothing Is NOT Cultural Appropriation | Our Legaci

Cultural appropriation is when a dominant culture takes, claims and establishes itself the creator of the cultural heritage and artifacts of a minority and or marginalized culture thereby erasing the history of the marginalized culture.

Is Natural Hair Going the Way of Fake Boobs and Tattoos? | Habari Gani, America!

naturalhair

Photo from Clarksville Natural Hair Show http://www.eventbrite.com

I think.. (Notice I said, “I think.”) that the hair revolution of the 1960’s and 70’s also went the way of the revolution – down the drain. We had no follow through. It was mostly a fad in the populous with no real grounding in our African culture. Similar to naming our children African sounding (Notice – I said, “African sounding”) names during that era. The theories and dialogue were there, but some were not just visual, they are followers – drones. There are numerous examples out there and even more numerous closer to home.

The main ideal was to change our culture and the rest would follow. But the populace grows weary of the struggle and for the past 40 years at least most reverted back to a quasi-Africanism. Natural hair has become a fad for the wanna-bee conscious and a state of being for the conscious, similar to the dashiki. Whites wore dashiki’s too in the 1960’s, but it was a state of rebellion against “the man.” When Chris Rock‘s statement to Black women clamoring for natural Indian hair in his documentary, “Good Hair,” did he ever think that the craze would bring about the ample supply of synthetic African styled extensions? It is still a fad for most. They want to be in. But the first time that they are turned down for a job because of their locks, they fold, feel those insecurities deepen, and lose ground. It has to become an inner-force – a love affair with the African body. Right now, it is like fake boobs and tattoos. After 40 of my 57 years, – I am still waiting.

Dear White Folks, Please Stop Being So ‘Surprised’ When White Cops Shoot Unarmed Black People | #OYRchallenge

The Daily Kos posted this article on September 29, 2014.  Since then the avalanche of written and video arguments against asking people to “check your privilege” has skyrocketed across social media. Comparative yeahs and nos are equal. But the understanding of what privilege really means is, sometimes by default, becoming patently clear. Surprisingly, some even feel victimized when asked to respect the boundaries of others. Amazing.

Nice work by chaunceydevegaDaily Kos

However well-intentioned and sincere the concern and surprise by the white American public and some in the chattering classes towards the events in Ferguson, the shooting of Jones by Groubert, or the panoply of unarmed black men by the police ever 28 hours in America may be, their response is still colored by white privilege.Black and brown Americans have been complaining about, organizing in response to, and publicly discussing police brutality and extra-judicial violence against their communities for several hundred years. Those concerns have largely been ignored by the white public.

via Dear White Folks, Please Stop Being So ‘Surprised’ When White Cops Shoot Unarmed Black People.

How to Start a Homeschool Co-op for Black Homeschoolers. | #OYRchallenge

Homeschooling or private education has been thrown negative bones in this century. Yet, I remember when it was the hopes of many for their children to receive a healthy private education. While growing up in the 1960’s New York City, private education was sought after by wealthy and middle-class families. Even some poor families did without so that their children could receive premium educations. The news of protesters advocating for public education often uncovers connections to teachers unions and government organizations. Few show any sincerity, besides platitudes, for the general welfare of our African children. The statistics and news reports of violence against our children while in their care supports this. Disparaging slurs and rehearsed talking points on African American progress, news, and education further highlights the need for African American children to be educated in an African-friendly environment.  And I say this because????

Dr. Samori Camara invests in socializing African children within their culture, with the current advancements in the American society. He also recognizes the necessity for them to utilize the talents of those of like minds in the rudimentary subject matters and expanded materials. This initiative is not just for African children; it is done all over the world, by many communities, ethnicities, and religions. We still live in a system where the wealthy may choose how and by who their children will be educated, yet the poor are hounded when trying to privately educate their children. Poverty imprisons our children to learn from those who do not respect or appreciate us.

Today, we are urged by teacher’s unions, who are by-the-way champions of race discrimination in public schools, to support public education. Data is collected on failed private entities, such as some Charter Schools, to support their ragged claims to the ignorant that public education is best for our children. Not so. Our inner city public schools are a mess of calculations, re-designations, social manipulations, and traps to keep our African American communities helpless and hopeless.

Private education is best for the entire family and community. Parents and other involved adults are now responsible to forward their own education in order to supply their students and children with the most current and diverse education available, while fostering positive images of their culture and communities. Teachers are family members, friends, and local talent. Families are not sending their children off to robotics class to learn “how to work for someone else,” but are learning to seek out and appreciate their own talents within their communities.

Families I encounter on trips to libraries, seminars, workshops, and entertainment venues, take these opportunities to expand their children’s education. Education is a life experience, 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. You pay your principal, therefore he or she listens to your concerns. If you are homeschooling, concerns are addressed within your community. Your family’s life journey does not end on Friday at 3:00 pm. So why should its education begin with someone else. #OYRchallenge

Education for Liberation: The Top 20 Questions and Answers for Black Homeschoolers by Dr. Samori Camara Get it here:

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BEL8IK8

Afrikan centered homeschooling is on the rise, but we should definitely not do it alone. A cooperative can help with your Black homeschool endeavors. In the video, I cover some of the benefits. They are many more. Watch, share, subscribe.

Revolutionary Love,

Dr. Samori Camara

‘The Twelve Tribes of Hattie,’ by Ayana Mathis – NYTimes.com

‘The Twelve Tribes of Hattie,’ by Ayana Mathis – NYTimes.com.

Hattie, her men and her children — unmoored, lost and isolated — stumble through a joyless world where “talcum powder and hair grease and smoke fouled the air.” All are seeking a place for themselves, an identity to hang on to: sexual, spiritual, geographic, familial. 

Gurrrl, You Just Have to Read This! The 2013 Clutch Reading Challenge | Clutch Magazine

Gurrrl, You Just Have to Read This! The 2013 Clutch Reading Challenge

readingThis is what happens when bookish black women start talking about good literature on a lazy holiday weekday. I asked folks on Twitter andFacebook to help me craft a list of 10 books by black women that everyone should read. Instead of 10, I got 100.
http://www.clutchmagonline.com/2013/01/gurrrl-you-just-have-to-read-this-the-2013-clutch-reading-challenge/#.UOj-0weHVHs.gmail

Commercialized Hip-Hop: The Gospel of Self-Destruction | Your Black World

Commercialized Hip-Hop: The Gospel of Self-Destruction | Your Black World.

“I swear you can’t f*ck with me
But I can f*ck your girl and make her nut for me
Then slutt for me, then kill for me, then steal for me
And of course it’ll be your cash
Then I’ll murder that b*tch
and send her body back to your a*s” – Lil Wayne, “We Be Steady Mobbin”

Imagine an entire generation of young people hearing lyrics like this on a daily basis, reciting mantras that glorify drug and alcohol consumption, the objectification of women, murdering other black people, anti-intellectualism, financial irresponsibility and every other thing you can do to destroy your life.  Do you REALLY believe that a child can hear this message every single day, repeating these lyrics literally thousands of times and not have his subconscious mind altered by the messages he’s consuming?   Do you REALLY think that the corporations earning billions of dollars from this form of weaponized psychological genocide care one bit about whether your son ends up in the prison, the morgue, the rehab center, the insane asylum or the unemployment line?