books

Challenge | Barbershop Books

Harlem has always been the east coast mecca for Black culture and art. I remember my days at Hunter College, trolling the uptown bookstores for that rare author. With this tradition Alvin Irby‘s project, Barbershop Boys, recognizes and meets the challenges that prevent young Black youth from developing a healthy love for books.   

NBC Today: How Barbershop Books Is Getting Young Boys Excited About Reading

In 2013, former kindergarten and first-grade teacher Alvin Irby launched “Barbershop Books,” an initiative that targets young black boys who frequent barbershops and aims to improve their reading comprehension by encouraging them to dive into the world of literature. 

The Barbershop Books website describes its purpose: “To close the reading gap for young black boys by using child-centered, culturally relevant, and high-impact strategies.” According to the White House, 86 percent of black boys are below proficient reading levels by the fourth grade, compared to 58 percent of white boys in the same category. 

 

Barbershop Books

via Challenge | Barbershop Books.

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America’s Dangerous Turn to Anti-Intellectualism | Alternet

America's Dangerous Turn to Anti-Intellectualism | Alternet

Recently, I found out that my work is mentioned in a book that has been banned, in effect, from the schools in Tucson, Arizona. The anti-ethnic studies law passed by the state prohibits teachings that “promote the overthrow of the United States government,” “promote resentment toward a race or class of people,” “are designed primarily for pupils of a particular ethnic group,” and/or “advocate ethnic solidarity instead of the treatment of pupils as individuals.” I invite you to read the book in question, titled Critical Race Theory: An Introduction, so that you can decide for yourselves whether it qualifies.

via America’s Dangerous Turn to Anti-Intellectualism | Alternet.

African-American Books: Summer Reading Recommendations – The Root

‘The Root’ family offers this summer reading list. But why wait until summer?

Who says summer reading has to be fluff? There are so many recent titles and reprinted standouts tackling the black experience—in poetry, biography and works of fiction—that even the most voracious readers can barely keep up. Pack one of these to turn a trip to the pool into an inspiring escape, and get your sun with a side of substance. There are more where these came from, but this list will have you on track to read one a week between now and the end of beach season.

via African-American Books: Summer Reading Recommendations – The Root.

Chronic Low Self Esteem: Understanding Its Impact | Healthy Black Woman

If you have ever known a person with chronic low self esteem, you will not find it hard to remember them. This is the person who was extremely manipulative, insecure and toxic.

via Chronic Low Self Esteem: Understanding Its Impact | Healthy Black Woman.

 

‘The Twelve Tribes of Hattie,’ by Ayana Mathis – NYTimes.com

‘The Twelve Tribes of Hattie,’ by Ayana Mathis – NYTimes.com.

Hattie, her men and her children — unmoored, lost and isolated — stumble through a joyless world where “talcum powder and hair grease and smoke fouled the air.” All are seeking a place for themselves, an identity to hang on to: sexual, spiritual, geographic, familial. 

Gurrrl, You Just Have to Read This! The 2013 Clutch Reading Challenge | Clutch Magazine

Gurrrl, You Just Have to Read This! The 2013 Clutch Reading Challenge

readingThis is what happens when bookish black women start talking about good literature on a lazy holiday weekday. I asked folks on Twitter andFacebook to help me craft a list of 10 books by black women that everyone should read. Instead of 10, I got 100.
http://www.clutchmagonline.com/2013/01/gurrrl-you-just-have-to-read-this-the-2013-clutch-reading-challenge/#.UOj-0weHVHs.gmail

100 Notable Books of 2012 – NYTimes.com

New York Times

100 Notable Books of 2012 – NYTimes.com.

The year’s notable fiction, poetry and nonfiction, selected by the editors of The New York Times Book Review.

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/02/books/review/100-notable-books-of-2012.html?smid=pl-share