Black media

Think Out Loud: The Emerging Black Digital Intelligentsia | The New Republic

Along with [Ta-Nehisi] Coates, a cohort of what I would like to call the “black digital intelligentsia” has emerged. They wrestle with ideas, stake out political territory, and lead, very much in the same way that my generation did, only without needing, or necessarily wanting, a home in the Ivy League—and by making their name online. They include, to name only a few, Jamelle Bouie at Slate, Nikole Hannah-Jones at The New York Times Magazine, Joy Reid at MSNBC, Jamilah Lemieux at Ebony, and the New Republic’s Jamil Smith. Brilliant, eloquent, deeply learned writers and thinkers, they contend with the issues of the day, online, on television, wherever they can. Academics haven’t disappeared, of course. Their influence, however, isn’t exclusively dependent on validation at the university level. Podcasts, blog posts, social media, and television shows are of vital importance for them. Among this number, I would also include Marc Lamont Hill, James Braxton Peterson, Brittney Cooper, Jelani Cobb, and Melissa Harris-Perry

 Despite all the talk of the digital divide—the very real gulf that separates those with access to technology from the black and brown folk who lack it—the black digital intelligentsia has ingeniously used technology to extend and explore thought and fight injustice. Black folk, and particularly well-educated, elite black folk, have taken more quickly and creatively to technology than their white peers, and turned its myriad functions to our social and professional use. “Black Twitter” may be infamous for scorning white women like Rachel Dolezal who think they are black, but it has also pioneered the idea of hashtag activism, such as #SayHerName, which highlighted the invisibility of black women in discussions of police violence in black communities, or #SolidarityIsForWhiteWomen, with its allusion to tensions between black and white feminists, to offer but two examples. 

Source: Think Out Loud: The Emerging Black Digital Intelligentsia | The New Republic

Do Black People Have Equal Gun Rights? – NYTimes.com | #OYRchallenge

Gunrights

The Cheetum family in Doerun, Ga., in 1950. Credit Bettmann/Corbis

There was a question posed to an African American group opposed to gun rights in America. “If your entire block died from drinking too much Kool-Aid, would your next electoral platform be to ban Kool-Aid from the open market in America?”

CONVENTIONAL wisdom holds that firearms are the preserve of conservative white men. You would never know this at my local shooting range, which happens to be in a majority African-American area, and has a clientele that reflects that fact. There, as a white man, I’m often in the minority; just one more guy who likes to fire weapons — another person to chat to and share stories with. It is, I’d venture, how things should be.

via Do Black People Have Equal Gun Rights? – NYTimes.com.

Parenting While Black … and Middle-class on TV by Lisa B. Thompson | NewBlackMan in Exile

This review of Blackish by Lisa B. Thompson is well worth the read. As a former student of her classes, – and I mean classes, there is no one better to review our media. She has the energy, insight, and talent to find and critique most of our popular culture. Thompson’s work is guided by a serious love for her work and an insane passion for theater. Catching this review of Blackish was a gem. Thank you, Professor T.

Parenting While Black ... and Middle-class on TV by Lisa B. Thompson | NewBlackMan in Exile

Excerpt 

This year also marks the 30th anniversary of Bill Cosby’s black middle-class family sitcom featuring Cliff and Claire Huxtable and their five brilliant, gorgeous children, once the most popular program on TV for viewers of all races. Even children today who catch episodes become instant fans. 

Unfortunately, till now, American television has yet to replace it with another show about a middle-class black family. In fact, images of black middle-class families have disappeared from the cultural landscape, reinforcing false notions only one authentic black experience. 

Lisa B. Thompson is the author of Beyond the Black Lady: Sexuality and the New African American Middle Class and the play Single Black Female. She is an associate professor of African and African diaspora studies at the University of Texas at Austin where she is an OpEd Project Public Voices fellow. Follow her on Twitter @playprof. #OYRchallenge

via Parenting While Black … and Middle-class on TV by Lisa B. Thompson | NewBlackMan in Exile.

Paul Ryan was called a racist, but did Michelle Obama make the same comment? | Your Black World

Yvette Carnell teams up with Dr. Boyce Watkins to chime in on the discourse following Paul Ryan’s recent disparaging quotes. Check http://habariganiamerica.net for comments by Ta-Nehisi Coates and others.

Dr. Boyce Watkins:

Recently, Paul Ryan was called out for remarks about inner city men, with Democrats calling him a racist.  But Bill Maher pointed out that Michelle Obama made a set of remarks that were similar to those of Ryan. So, what does that say?

via Paul Ryan was called a racist, but did Michelle Obama make the same comment? | Your Black World.