Black Lives Matter

The Unspoken Response to Black Lives Matter vs Black on Black Crime and Other Maladies Black | Habari Gani, America!

A worthy read is “Nobody: Casualties of America’s War on the Vulnerable, from Ferguson to Flint and Beyond” by Marc Lamont Hill, Morehouse University professor and new addition to the morning radio show the “Breakfast Club.”

In an interviewMarc Lamont Hill for AOL BUILD, Hill said it. Within the few minutes allowed, he said what many of the socially conscious are thinking when sidelined from the Black Lives Matter agenda with the discussion of Black on Black crime and Black disobedience.  Hill states that “People who even if they don’t get killed by state violence through the form of bullets, they’re still committed to … slow death row – the death of poverty…

I  read at least five newspapers per day. Electronic media allows not only the authors response to a situation, but included are the public responses as well. From the death of Trayvon Martin in February 2012 to the more recent deaths of Alton Sterling and Philandro Castile, journalist and public commentators spoke within the confines of police and victim, prejudice and privilege, law and order. The policy driven isolation and destruction of Black economy creating targets of Black men and women never came into focus during these discussions – until now.

Before we continue our discussions of policy and practice, read “Nobody: Casualties of America’s War on the Vulnerable, from Ferguson to Flint and Beyond.”

View a snippet of Marc Lamont Hills AOL interview here at NewBlackMan (in Exile):

Source: Marc Lamont Hill Talks New Book ‘Nobody: Casualties of America’s War on the Vulnerable…’ | NewBlackMan (in Exile)

#MLKNOW Brings Out Chris Rock, Harry Belafonte, & More To Honor MLK | News One

2016 MLK Now

Blackout for Human Rights, Riverside Church

Click on the Link Below for the performances in the entirety.

Blackout for Human Rights and The Campaign for Black Male Achievement

On the week that would have marked the late leader’s 87th birthday, social justice groups Blackout for Human Rights and The Campaign for Black Male Achievement celebrated Dr. King’s legacy and more with MLK Now at the legendary Riverside Church in Harlem, New York. Monday night’s event highlighted historic speeches by civil rights heroes like MLK, Malcolm X, Fred Hampton, Sojourner Truth, and Shirley Chisholm, recited by Lin Miranda-Manuel, Andre Holland, Michael B. Jordan, Octavia Spencer, and civil rights icon Harry Belafonte.

Source: #MLKNOW Brings Out Chris Rock, Harry Belafonte, & More To Honor MLK | News One

America Feels The Bern: Bernie Sanders Now Front-Runner (video) | The Young Turks

Watching this video of the excited Cenk Uygur host this episode of The Young Turks gave me pause. Suppose he does win?  I first became interested in Bernie Sanders because he reminded me of the yearly love/hate relationship I had with a leather salesman on Delancey St., NYC. I would be there early in the morning the week before school started. The first customer got the best deals back then. The shop keeper would eye me curiously. It always took him at least 6 minutes (I began to time him) of me flipping through his racks of leather coats for him to take me seriously.

The shop was a scary, dim, and crowded den. Scraggly. Something like the Bernie Sanders who first appeared on my Facebook page. But it held all of the goodies, all of the right smells, and the right prices for my pocket. The shop keeper spoke ripe and sharp as he explained the grain and texture of leather. I have heard his lecture every year but listened intently. I stroked the softest fur-lined coat while he bantered, but it is the first price I am waiting to hear.

Source: America Feels The Bern: Bernie Sanders Now Front-Runner (video)

This is the relationship that I am experiencing with this Presidential candidate. He speaks in the excited, unrehearsed malevolence that makes you think, I want him in my corner during a fight. And yes America, we seem to be in a fight for our lives.

When our Black Lives Matter representatives corralled Bernie’s space during the TWiB conference, I held my breath waiting for that 6 minutes to end. Of course Bernie and the rest of the world were shocked. Respectability politics dictates that Black Lives Mattered only in quiet spaces. Bernie was shocked most of all because his liberal All Live Matter issues had not included race since the 1960’s Civil Rights Era. But adding to his laundry list was imperative and our ladies did their job.

Not long after, racial equality was tacked on to the disheveled hair and rumpled suit. During every speech, I listened for that call for justice like the shop owners footsteps creeping up behind me. His crowds are growing alongside those of the scandalous Donald Trump and stumbling Ben Carson. Now that the ignored, cajoled, and crazy Bernie Sanders has captured the Democratic heart, will he keep his promise? I wonder.

When I picture Bernie Sanders running against Trump or Carson in the 2016 election, there are circus acts performing in the background. I am on a flight to the Caribbean having already mailed in my ballot. My cellphone, tablet, laptop are all off. Everyone on the airplane sighs as we lift off. And just before the drink cart creaks by, the flight attendant taps the mic. “Ladies and Gentlemen, we have an announcement. Our new President is… Deez Nuts!”

Ferguson and beyond: how a new civil rights movement began – and won’t end | DeRay McKesson | Comment is free | The Guardian

DeRay McKesson, like most of our young protesters, has had to have a thick skin during the past year. He has been the subject of many attacks surely aimed at the #BlackLivesMatter movement and is now referred to by some journalist and agencies as a “professional protester.” Now, Yale University is giving this new civil rights activist and chronicler a platform to show that he is more than any of the disparaging symbols forced on our conscience.

Those that have not supported McKesson, nor championed his energy during the many protests against Black genocide held around the country, may have to rethink all of what they have heard and seen. What lies behind the mask?  
If not for Twitter and Instagram, Missouri officials would have convinced you, one year ago, that we simply did not exist. Or that we were the aggressors, rather than the victims. That we, and not they, were the violent ones.

But social media was our weapon against erasure. It is how many of us first became aware of the protests and how we learned where to go, or what to do when teargassed, or who to trust. We were able to both counter the narrative being spun by officials while connecting with each other in unprecedented ways. Many of us became friends digitally, first. And then we, the protestors, met in person.

Social media allowed us to become our own storytellers. With it, we seized the power of our truth.

Source: Ferguson and beyond: how a new civil rights movement began – and won’t end | DeRay McKesson | Comment is free | The Guardian

Oath Keepers Under Attack For Going To Ferguson – Then Its President Dropped A Truth Bomb

Far from wanted to be seen as a threat, [Stewart] Rhodes [President of Oath Keepers] explained that his group traveled to Ferguson with weapons in tow as a lesson to those who have bought into the “false choice being presented to the American people that the only way to stop arson and looters is to trample on the First Amendment rights of the protesters or to have a hypermilitarized police state.”

via Oath Keepers Under Attack For Going To Ferguson – Then Its President Dropped A Truth Bomb.

Janelle Monae & Wondaland – Hell You Talmbout (Eephus Tour Philadelphia 8-12-15) – YouTube

This election year, if your local, state, and national candidates are silent about #BlackLivesMatter, – they are not your candidates. Print #BlackLivesMatter on your ballot.

via Janelle Monae & Wondaland – Hell You Talmbout (Eephus Tour Philadelphia 8-12-15) – YouTube.

Published on Aug 13, 2015

Janelle Monae and the entire Wondaland records family perform her socially conscious song “Hell You Talm Bout” live at the kickoff night of the Eephus Tour at Union Transfer in Philadelphia, PA

Baltimore violence follows in tragic pattern | Rachel Maddow – MSNBC

Baltimore violence follows in tragic pattern

Rachel Maddow reviews the recent history of civil unrest in response to police violence against people of color, exposed to the public by a series of mostly civilian sourced videos.

via Baltimore violence follows in tragic pattern | MSNBC.

Noam Chomsky: White America’s Cruelty to Black People Far Worse Than South Africa | Alternet

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If you listen to the rhetoric on Martin Luther King Day, it’s instructive. It typically ends with the “I Have a Dream” speech and the voting rights. And Martin Luther King didn’t stop there. He went on to condemning the war in Vietnam and to raising class issues. He began to raise class issues and turn to the North. At that point, he fell out of favor and disappeared. He was trying to—he was assassinated when he was trying to organize a poor people’s movement, and he was supporting a sanitation workers’ strike in Memphis. There was supposed to be a march to Washington to establish a poor people’s movement, appeal to Congress to do something about class issues.

via Noam Chomsky: White America’s Cruelty to Black People Far Worse Than South Africa | Alternet.

How Much Will Black Lives Matter 50 Years from Now | Habari Gani, America!

The Black Lives Matter reading list: Books to change the world | Minnesota Public Radio News

Sitting here reading David Autin’s, ‘All Roads Led To Montreal: Black Power, The Caribbean, and The Black Radical Tradition in Canada,’ with one eye on the news articles scrolling my Facebook page. Austin writes, in 2007, of major Caribbean-Canadian players forming committees and conventions to let Montreal and surrounding areas know that Black lives matter in 1967. Austin connects no death with the  1960’s Black Canadian politicians’ spark to Black cultural and political revolution, save for the absence of African recognition within the context of European-Canadian communities. They sniffed the air of Black revolutionaries across the border in the United States and West Indian independence to the southeast of Florida. And began to crawl out of the corners for a better view.

The Caribbean Conference Committee and later the Montreal New World Group served as the first anchors for collaborations and information-sharing. Still, these were peaceful inroads – a tight, hygienic revolution, as Austin portrays it. The current, Black Lives Matter movement did not have these comforting underpinnings. Michael Brown and many other Black youths in America opened the flood gates of protests that all started out mournful and mostly peaceful; although some ended in arrests, injuries, mayhem, and most important disfiguring headlines aimed to mute the cries and wipe away blood on the streets of Missouri, New York, Illinois, California, and most other states.

I turn back to Facebook. MPRNews.org’s Digital Books Producer, Tracy Mumford, writes ‘The Black Lives Matter reading list: Books to change the world.’  The time is too short and the wounds still too wet for any great author to complete a manuscript framing the Black Lives Matter debate. The article, however, advertises for bookstores who can now clear their inventory of African and African American scholarship in one swoop. We get to argue policy and problematic verses loose in social media. We have begun to package our newest creation – bloodless and blameless.

How will historians frame the current Black Lives Movement 50 years from now? After all, Austin’s near pristine 2007 account of the 1960’s African emergence from the Canadian shadows offers nothing more than well-groomed men sitting at a chess board. The only ruffles are the snickers and snaps as each berate the other’s well-calculated move into a semblance of the Black Power and Civil Rights movements of the United States.  Will Mike Brown’s death become clothed in the rhetoric of Martin Luther King, Jr, long dead by the time Brown was born? Will anyone dig up the video account of Eric Gardner being choked to death on a Staten Island sidewalk? How will Tamir Rice’s family remember that his bones helped fuel the fire already enlightening African American children that Black lives do matter in America, —  if only to them?  And most of all, with our advanced communications, social media, and electronic publications how many years is it going to take to manage these historical events — just right?

 

Excerpt:

For Wintaye Gebru, the store’s general manager, the list hit very close to home. When the protests began, she was living in Ferguson.

“As a young, African-American woman and a Ferguson resident, I often feel that our story and the story of so many others who have lived similar lives have been hijacked or distorted by a narrative we didn’t create,” said Gebru.

“The reading list is our attempt at redirecting and widening that narrative so that it actually includes the observations and experiences of blacks in America.”

via The Black Lives Matter reading list: Books to change the world | Minnesota Public Radio News.