Black higher education

Why the All-Ivy League Story Stirs Up Tensions Between African Immigrants and Black Americans – The Wire

The story of the first-generation Ghanian-American student accepted by all eight Ivy league schools is wonderful, but it also stirs up the tension between black Americans and recent African immigrants — especially when you describe him as “not a typical African-American kid.” That’s been the reaction to USA Today’s profile on Kwasi Enin, a Long Island high schooler who got into the nation’s most competitive schools through hard work and, according to IvyWise CEO Katherine Cohen, being African (and being male). At one point the piece reads:

Being a first-generation American from Ghana also helps him stand out, Cohen says. “He’s not a typical African-American kid.”

via Why the All-Ivy League Story Stirs Up Tensions Between African Immigrants and Black Americans – The Wire.

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Black Women are the Most Educated Group in the United States

For the first time in the history of data collection by the National Center of Education Statistics as reported by the US Census, Black women have surpassed every other group in this country based upon race and gender. What does that mean? For the first time in our history, African-American women have surpassed all groups in college entrance based upon race and gender. That’s right. African American women enroll in college more than Asian men, white women – you name the group, either race or gender, African American women are number one.

via Black Women are the Most Educated Group in the United States.