Black girls

Study: Black Girls Are Being Pushed Out of School : Code Switch : NPR

Columbia University law professor Kimberle Williams Crenshaw and her associates, Priscilla Ocen and Jyoti Nanda, set out to explain in their study, Black Girls Matter: Pushed Out, Overpoliced and Underprotected.

They examined data from public schools in Boston and New York City, and the results are startling: Girls of color, and especially black girls, are subject to discipline that is harsher and more frequent than that of their white peers, and are six times more likely to be suspended than white girls. The racial disparities in punishment are greater for girls than for boys.

via Study: Black Girls Are Being Pushed Out of School : Code Switch : NPR.

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10 Learned Behaviors of a Black Girl — Everyday Feminism

This Andie Berry article published in Everyday Feminism is a necessary item in the Black Girls toolbox.

Andie Berry writes:

I often felt like my parents were teaching me to be a complacent, extremely hardworking robot-woman (i.e. the mammy archetype). I now realize that they were doing their best to teach me how to survive the intersections of being Black and a woman in a world that hated both.

via 10 Learned Behaviors of a Black Girl — Everyday Feminism.

Darker-Skinned African-American Students Suspended More Frequently – Higher Education | #OYRchallenge

The study’s findings of a positive correlation between darker skin and higher suspension rates held even after other factors were taken into account, such as the socioeconomic status of the students’ parents, delinquent behavior, academic performance and other variables.

As research literature, the study provides a rich contextual and historical discussion of “colorism”—that is, the distinctions that have been made among Blacks of different skin tones in the United States since the days of the antebellum South.

For instance, it notes how one of the earliest uses of the term “colorism” in American popular culture was by Alice Walker, author of “The Color Purple,” who described it in 1983 as “prejudicial or preferential treatment of same-race people based solely on their color.”

via Darker-Skinned African-American Students Suspended More Frequently – Higher Education.