Atlantic

Why We Took Cocaine Out of Soda – James Hamblin – The Atlantic

1894 ad for Vin Mariani,  art by Jules Cheret

Anyone with a nickel, black or white, could now drink the cocaine-infused beverage. Middle-class whites worried that soft drinks were contributing to what they saw as exploding cocaine use among African-Americans. Southern newspapers reported that “negro cocaine fiends” were raping white women, the police powerless to stop them. By 1903, [then-manager of Coca-Cola Asa Griggs] Candler had bowed to white fears (and a wave of anti-narcotics legislation), removing the cocaine and adding more sugar and caffeine.

via Why We Took Cocaine Out of Soda – James Hamblin – The Atlantic.

 

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The Language of Segregation Under Social Sanction – Ta-Nehisi Coates – The Atlantic

 Ta-Nehisi Coates

Continuing from our conversation around housing segregation and the language employed by those with power I think it’s worth thinking some about the text of this petition:

“As moral, religious and law-abiding citizens, we feel that we are unprejudiced and undiscriminating in our wish to keep our community a closed community … to protect our own.”

The petition was put out in 1957, as Levittown sought to stave off integration. What’s important to note is that we are well into post-war America and there is some social sanction emerging against prejudice and discrimination. What the petition does is effectively endorse prejudice and discrimination while claiming not to. Another example:

“We favor racial integration, but only at such time the negro shows he is ready for it.”

via The Language of Segregation Under Social Sanction – Ta-Nehisi Coates – The Atlantic.

 

What’s the Matter With Florida? – The Atlantic

What’s the Matter With Florida? – The Atlantic.

The gap between West and his opponent is outside of the official number needed to trigger a recount. Still, I’d love to hear about those errors, and how you lose three hundred votes. I’m sure this isn’t an abnormality. But in close elections it matters. We really need to do better.