apartheid

Trevor Noah turns African stereotypes on America – This Is Africa | #OYRchallenge

 Appearing on the the hit American satirical news show, The Daily Show, South African comedian Trevor Noah, spoke with the host, Jon Stewart about his anxiety around visiting the United States

It actually is quite silly but, if you really think about it, most of the stuff Trevor Noah highlights here has a touch of truth with it.

Using current affairs as a point of comic departure, Noah, expresses his fear of American police, comparing them to the brutal apartheid police of the old South Africa. With sharp irony, he also launches an offensive on the US’s attitude to Ebola ‘in Africa’ (stating a funny but true fact about Ebola statistics between South Africa & the US). And, of course, what would current affairs comedy be without a jab at Bob Geldof’s silly Band Aid 30 initiative.

via Trevor Noah turns African stereotypes on America – This Is Africa.

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Black lawyers to challenge police brutality in 25 cities | #OYRchallenge

Black Lawyers in conjunction with the National Bar Association taking steps to address wholesale massacre of young black youth. “[Pamela] Meanes called police brutality the new civil rights issue of this era, an issue that disproportionately impacts the Black community.” #OYRchallenge

Dancing to the tune of whiteness?

Dancing to the tune of whiteness?.

Of all the responses written to the Gillian Schutte article, this one seemed to hit the theme straight on. We as Africans are still eavesdropping on a conversation we must abide, and an argument we should bow out gracefully. It is time for people to heal their own communities and stop tripping over the offenses of the Other. There will be centuries before we stop hearing the weeping, “But I am not racist. I spent good money on MC Hammer tickets.”

Instead of interrogating the validity of the social issues raised by Schutte, the bigots chose to defend atrocious white behaviour and attitudes towards indigenous Africans while creating distractions that deviate from engaging with the core issues.

This they do by innuendos and threats, and by questioning Schutte’s legitimacy to speak her truth; to recognise whiteness, to openly point out and criticise such inhumane patterns that violate human rights and dignity.

But this is nothing new when it comes to whiteness responding to its own pathology. What we also witnessed was that they were not alone in questioning Schutte’s legitimacy; by their sides, a collective of co-opted black South Africans — including so-called “born-free” blacks — made similar accusations.

By association they then get pulled into this apartheid-styled tactic that racists use to prevent people from engaging in a genuine social dialogue that can help South Africa address the power dynamics of racism and social inequalities.