Al-Qaeda

Child Casualties As a Result of U.S. Drone Strikes

U.S. drone strikes in Pakistan and Yemen have caused the death of 178 children. Accompanying report: http://www.scribd.com/doc/115147268/Y…

 

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Mali: French troops encircle Timbuktu as fleeing Islamists burn ancient scrolls – Telegraph

Cour de la mosquée de Djingareiber, Tombouctou

A building housing tens of thousands of manuscripts from the ancient Muslim world and Greece was set aflame, raising fears of further damage to the country’s cultural heritage after months of destruction by radical Islamists.

French paratroopers swooped in to try to block fleeing hardliners as ground troops coming from the south seized the airport of Timbuktu, which has been a bastion of the extremists controlling the north for 10 months.

via Mali: French troops encircle Timbuktu as fleeing Islamists burn ancient scrolls – Telegraph.

Timbuktu: History of Fabled Center of Learning

Timbuktu’

Timbuktu is a city in Mali, in West Africa, that was founded 1,800 years ago. During Europe’s Middle Ages, it was home to a rich writing tradition that saw the creation of millions of manuscripts, hundreds of thousands of which survive to present day.

via Timbuktu: History of Fabled Center of Learning.

 

Algeria hostage siege comes to deadly end

Published on Jan 17, 2013
At least 30 hostages and 11 members of an al-Qaeda-affiliated group were killed when Algerian forces stormed a desert gas plant to free the captives, Reuters news agency has quoted an Algerian security source as saying. Eight Algerians and seven foreigners, including two British, two Japanese and a French national, were among the dead, the source said. Al Jazeera’s Alan Fisher reports.

 

“Unintended Consequences of Military Intervention”: Roots of Mali, Algeria Crisis Tied to Libya War

“Unintended Consequences of Military Intervention”: Roots of Mali, Algeria Crisis Tied to Libya War.

Emira Woods, co-director of Foreign Policy In FocusIn Algeria, at least 22 foreign hostages remained unaccounted for in what has been described as one of the biggest international hostage crises in decades. Islamist militants opposed to the French air strikes in neighboring Mali seized a gas facility near the Libyan border. It remains unclear how many people died on Thursday when Algerian forces stormed the desert gas complex to free the workers. Meanwhile, the Obama administration has acknowledged it is now directly aiding France’s military operation in Mali. We speak to Emira Woods, co-director of Foreign Policy In Focus at the Institute for Policy Studies. [includes rush transcript]