African American girls

Study: Black Girls Are Being Pushed Out of School : Code Switch : NPR

Columbia University law professor Kimberle Williams Crenshaw and her associates, Priscilla Ocen and Jyoti Nanda, set out to explain in their study, Black Girls Matter: Pushed Out, Overpoliced and Underprotected.

They examined data from public schools in Boston and New York City, and the results are startling: Girls of color, and especially black girls, are subject to discipline that is harsher and more frequent than that of their white peers, and are six times more likely to be suspended than white girls. The racial disparities in punishment are greater for girls than for boys.

via Study: Black Girls Are Being Pushed Out of School : Code Switch : NPR.

Barriers Rooted in Race and Gender Bias Harm Educational Outcomes of African American Girls and Must Be Addressed, New Report Shows | NAACP LDF | OYRchallenge

This article is based on the NAACP report, Unlocking Opportunity For African American Girls: A Call to Action for Educational Equity. One premise that has held true since the 1960’s, is that the quality of teaching usurps all other factors in a child’s life. “One growing body of research shows that student achievement is more heavily influenced by teacher quality than by students’ race, class, prior academic record, or a school a student attends. This is especially true for students from low-income families and African American students. The benefits associated with being taught by good teachers are cumulative.” African American Girls education

The report, Unlocking Opportunity for African American Girls:  A Call to Action for Educational Equity, outlines what are sometimes insurmountable barriers to staying in school and how poor educational outcomes result in limited job opportunities, lower lifetime earnings, and increased risk of economic insecurity for African American women. In 2013, 43 percent of African American women without a high school diploma were living in poverty, compared to nine percent of African American women with at least a bachelor’s degree. The report examines roadblocks faced by both African American girls and boys—such as under-resourced schools—and emphasizes those that have a distinct impact on African American girls due to the intersection of gender and race stereotypes. These barriers include lack of access to college-and career-preparatory curricula in schools; limited access to athletics and other extracurricular activities; disproportionate and overly punitive disciplinary practices that exclude them from school for minor and subjective infractions, such as dress code violations and wearing natural hairstyles; discrimination against pregnant and parenting students; and pervasive sexual harassment and violence.

via Barriers Rooted in Race and Gender Bias Harm Educational Outcomes of African American Girls and Must Be Addressed, New Report Shows | NAACP LDF.

“To obtain a copy of the report, please contact:

LDF Communications Department

40 Rector Street, 5th Floor

New York, NY 10006

E-mail requests for hard copies of the report to

seehersucceed@naacpldf.org

To download a copy, please visit:

http://www.naacpldf.org or http://www.nwlc.org “

Encouraging Young Girls To Be Happy With Their Hair | MadameNoire #OYRchallenge

Visiting a sister claiming the Natural Hair generation came as a great surprise when on a trip to her bathroom proved her most false. The shelves, lined with cosmetics, included several boxes of chemical and quasi-natural texturizers. Even more surprising was her consistent head swivels, while noting how tight her younger daughter’s curls are compared to the looser-curled older sister.

Conversations such as these throw me head first into the bowl, but considering some of the most disturbing behavior to seeing African hair at its natural has come from African American women in social media – I simply shook my head. Gabby Douglas and Beyonce’s baby daughter took almost more hits in social media than mass incarceration and a failing public education system among young African American women. This begs the question, is natural hair a new fad that will scurry into the fabric of America after the revolution, as dashiki’s of the 1960’s and 70’s, or are African American women having a tough time weaning off of the creamy-crackAfrican American girls

Girls and women should know and be able to easily recall the texture of their natural hair. It’s disheartening to hear a woman say she doesn’t know her true hair texture because she has kept up with a choice that was made by someone else to alter her hair many years ago as a child. It’s just another way of quietly stripping away the person she is by permanently changing her look and by taking away her choice. There is no reason a girl at six or seven years old needs a ‘treatment’ for her hair with all the information out there now about how to care for natural hair of a wide variety of textures.

via Encouraging Young Girls To Be Happy With Their Hair | MadameNoire.