African American education

I Support Dr. Umar Johnson’s Mission to Educate Black Boys

MY TRUE SENSE

umar johnson

As some of you may know, acclaimed Pan-African Nationalist brother Dr. Umar Johnson is a brother using his voice and knowledge to push a strong Black agenda for our people. I listen to many of his unapologetic speeches, which I generally support because they echo brother Malcolm’s call for Black people to “Wake up, Clean up, and Stand up!”

Dr. Johnson made a power move recently when he announced his intention to create the Frederick Douglass & Marcus Garvey RBG International Leadership Academy for Black Boys. To facilitate that enormous task, Johnson started a Gofundme campaign to raise $5 million. You can learn more about Dr. Umar’s vision by viewing the video clip below:

Like any Black person who is well-informed, unapologetically Black, and focused on solving problems rather than just talking about them, brother Umar generates a flood of criticism ( I have personally endured this for decades and can strongly…

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How to Teach Men of Color: Four Critical Conditions | J. Luke Wood | Huff Post Black Voices

Although this article is directed at men of color, the higher education teaching shortlist presented here should be observed beyond a single profile. See references below if you need credentials.

How to Teach Men of Color: Four Critical Conditions | J. Luke Wood

This post is co-authored with Frank Harris III @fharris3 – Associate Professor, Postsecondary Education at San Diego State University; Khalid White @brother_white – Professor, Ethnic Studies and Umoja Program Coordinator at San Jose City College; and Marissa Vasquez-Urias @mvasquez619 – Lecturer, Community College Leadership at San Diego State University

via How to Teach Men of Color: Four Critical Conditions | J. Luke Wood.

Darker-Skinned African-American Students Suspended More Frequently – Higher Education | #OYRchallenge

The study’s findings of a positive correlation between darker skin and higher suspension rates held even after other factors were taken into account, such as the socioeconomic status of the students’ parents, delinquent behavior, academic performance and other variables.

As research literature, the study provides a rich contextual and historical discussion of “colorism”—that is, the distinctions that have been made among Blacks of different skin tones in the United States since the days of the antebellum South.

For instance, it notes how one of the earliest uses of the term “colorism” in American popular culture was by Alice Walker, author of “The Color Purple,” who described it in 1983 as “prejudicial or preferential treatment of same-race people based solely on their color.”

via Darker-Skinned African-American Students Suspended More Frequently – Higher Education.

Stop blaming black parents for underachieving kids – The Washington Post | #OYRchallenge

For decades, the fault in education disparities between low-income whites and  African Americans was thrown atop the African American parents and parenting skills. They are not equip to raise children to think critically, engage literature, and calculate, – some said. The some included government officials, teacher’s unions, and even Black officials. Maybe this article will set them straight. African American children

Mayors, teachers unions, and news commentators have boiled down the academic achievement gap between white and black students to one root cause: parents. Even black leaders and barbershop chatter target “lazy parents” for academic failure in their communities, dismissing the complex web of obstacles that assault urban students daily.

via Stop blaming black parents for underachieving kids – The Washington Post.