Africa

Black Americans Wearing African Clothing Is NOT Cultural Appropriation | Our Legaci

Source: Black Americans Wearing African Clothing Is NOT Cultural Appropriation | Our Legaci

Cultural appropriation is when a dominant culture takes, claims and establishes itself the creator of the cultural heritage and artifacts of a minority and or marginalized culture thereby erasing the history of the marginalized culture.

The Most Stylish Women In Africa-Who made The List | FashionGHANA.com: 100% African Fashion

Genevieve Nnaji (NIGERIA)

These Fashionistas rule in more ways than one.

Mirror Mirror on the wall, these ladies are polished without being fussy, sexy,classy and make statement in a way that people can’t. They are our most stylish women ruling Africa, with easy asses to designer clothing, they ensemble in a way to turn heads and steal attention on social media and in real life.

Number 1 is Genevieve Nnaji
See: The Most Stylish Women In Africa-Who made The List | FashionGHANA.com: 100% African Fashion.

Mugabe revives Gaddafi’s United States of Africa dream | World news | The Guardian

Mugabe revives Gaddafi's United States of Africa dream | World news | The Guardian

Speaking in Harare after meeting Benin’s president, Thomas Boni Yayi, who is the outgoing African Union (AU) chairman, Mugabe argued that a figurehead is needed to move Africa beyond regional blocs and into the global superleague.

“Get them to get out of the regional shell and get into one continental shell,” he was quoted as saying by the state-owned Herald newspaper.

“The continent of Africa: this is what we must become. And there, we must also have an African head. He was talking of the president of Africa. Yes, we need one. We are not yet there.

via Mugabe revives Gaddafi’s United States of Africa dream | World news | The Guardian.

Trevor Noah turns African stereotypes on America – This Is Africa | #OYRchallenge

 Appearing on the the hit American satirical news show, The Daily Show, South African comedian Trevor Noah, spoke with the host, Jon Stewart about his anxiety around visiting the United States

It actually is quite silly but, if you really think about it, most of the stuff Trevor Noah highlights here has a touch of truth with it.

Using current affairs as a point of comic departure, Noah, expresses his fear of American police, comparing them to the brutal apartheid police of the old South Africa. With sharp irony, he also launches an offensive on the US’s attitude to Ebola ‘in Africa’ (stating a funny but true fact about Ebola statistics between South Africa & the US). And, of course, what would current affairs comedy be without a jab at Bob Geldof’s silly Band Aid 30 initiative.

via Trevor Noah turns African stereotypes on America – This Is Africa.

Is 4-H trying to hook African farmers on costly seeds? | Grist

 

African seeds

When Kiera Butler went to Ghana to research what the farm education program 4-H was doing there, she found that it was working with the American seed company DuPont Pioneer to teach small farmers how to use high-yielding hybrid seeds. That’s part of her book, Raise: What 4-H Teaches Seven Million Kids and How Its Lessons Could Change Food and Farming Forever, and she published a story about it in Mother Jones titled: How America’s Favorite Baby-Goat Club Is Helping Big Ag Take Over Farming in Africa.

via Is 4-H trying to hook African farmers on costly seeds? | Grist.

Financial Juneteenth | How One of The Richest Black Women In The World Did It With No College Degree | #OYRchallenge

Our beautiful billionaire Nigerian queen, Folorunsho Alakija, trumps the rush to college promoted by American politicians. She is rich and did it all without a college degree. As of late, we are seeing many clock the 7 figure mark before scaling the ivory towers. Most are teens. So what does they say for the future of academia? Only Folorunsho can answer that question. Folorunsho Alakija

When you go to high school you are pushed to figure out which college you want to attend and what you would like to do with your life. They make college out to be something that you must do if you want to be successful. This is not always the case however. You can still be very successful in life without having a college degree under your belt. That is exactly what Folorunsho Alakija did. She is Nigeria’s wealthiest woman. She revealed recently that she never went to college but yet she has still managed to become a billionaire.

via Financial Juneteenth | How One of The Richest Black Women In The World Did It With No College Degree.

Barriers Rooted in Race and Gender Bias Harm Educational Outcomes of African American Girls and Must Be Addressed, New Report Shows | NAACP LDF | OYRchallenge

This article is based on the NAACP report, Unlocking Opportunity For African American Girls: A Call to Action for Educational Equity. One premise that has held true since the 1960’s, is that the quality of teaching usurps all other factors in a child’s life. “One growing body of research shows that student achievement is more heavily influenced by teacher quality than by students’ race, class, prior academic record, or a school a student attends. This is especially true for students from low-income families and African American students. The benefits associated with being taught by good teachers are cumulative.” African American Girls education

The report, Unlocking Opportunity for African American Girls:  A Call to Action for Educational Equity, outlines what are sometimes insurmountable barriers to staying in school and how poor educational outcomes result in limited job opportunities, lower lifetime earnings, and increased risk of economic insecurity for African American women. In 2013, 43 percent of African American women without a high school diploma were living in poverty, compared to nine percent of African American women with at least a bachelor’s degree. The report examines roadblocks faced by both African American girls and boys—such as under-resourced schools—and emphasizes those that have a distinct impact on African American girls due to the intersection of gender and race stereotypes. These barriers include lack of access to college-and career-preparatory curricula in schools; limited access to athletics and other extracurricular activities; disproportionate and overly punitive disciplinary practices that exclude them from school for minor and subjective infractions, such as dress code violations and wearing natural hairstyles; discrimination against pregnant and parenting students; and pervasive sexual harassment and violence.

via Barriers Rooted in Race and Gender Bias Harm Educational Outcomes of African American Girls and Must Be Addressed, New Report Shows | NAACP LDF.

“To obtain a copy of the report, please contact:

LDF Communications Department

40 Rector Street, 5th Floor

New York, NY 10006

E-mail requests for hard copies of the report to

seehersucceed@naacpldf.org

To download a copy, please visit:

http://www.naacpldf.org or http://www.nwlc.org “

Africa Straight Up – Official Film | #OYRchallenge

With more than a billion people spread across 54 countries speaking more than 3,000 languages, Africa cannot — and should not — be limited to a single narrative. Africa Straight Up is a more complete story about Africa and its diaspora.

Share your personal story about Africa at Africa.com or on Twitter @Africa_com with the hashtag #AfricaStraightUp. #OYRchallenge

Black Women Need More Outlets And Options For Their Stories To Be Told – The Root

From Left of Black:

Despite many news programs featuring African-American women as on-air hosts—Joy Reid of MSNBC’s The Reid Report, Robin Roberts on ABC’s Good Morning America, Gwen Ifill anchoring PBS Newshour and Michel Martin helming NPR’s Tell Me More, to name a few—there are still far too few people of color, particularly black women, in executive, editorial and production positions who have the decision-making authority to promote stories in ways that reflect the concerns of our communities.

via Black Women Need More Outlets And Options For Their Stories To Be Told – The Root.

lhaji Aliko Dangote | How investing in Africa made this man 7 Times Richer than Oprah Winfrey

lhaji Aliko Dangote

 is one of the richest men in the world.  He is currently worth $20.8 billion dollars and is the richest man in all of Africa.  Here are a few facts about Dangote that you may find intriguing:

via Financial Juneteenth | How investing in Africa made this man 7 Times Richer than Oprah Winfrey.