Affirmative action

Be color brave, not color blind: Mellody Hobson at TED2014 | TED Blog

Hobson wants to make clear, “I’m not here to complain. I’ve been treated well by people of all races more often than not. I have succeeded in my life more than my wildest expectations. I tell the uniform story because it happened. I tell the race stats because they are real.” And furthermore, those continuing problems threaten to rob future generations of their opportunities.


Source: Be color brave, not color blind: Mellody Hobson at TED2014 | TED Blog

PART THREE: The State of Equality and Justice in America

We need to have other voices in the conversation – voices that explain the importance of affirmative action for every student and for our society as a whole. The leaders of our corporations, our institutions of higher education, and our military know from their experience the importance of diversity in our classrooms.

     In 2003, the Supreme Court held in Grutter v. Bollinger that public colleges and universities could consider the race of applicants in selecting a class of students with the diversity to succeed in the modern world. A brief submitted to the Supreme Court by several large corporations explained that students could develop “the skills needed in today’s increasingly global marketplace” only through interactions inside and outside the classroom with “widely diverse people, cultures, ideas, and viewpoints.”

via PART THREE: The State of Equality and Justice in America.