Documentary

Stop Telling Women To Smile | FILMS FOR ACTION

“I AM NOT HERE FOR YOU!”

Stop Telling Women to Smile is an art series by Tatyana Fazlalizadeh. The work attempts to address gender based street harassment by placing drawn portraits of women, composed with captions that speak directly to offenders, outside in public spaces. 

Tatyana Falalizadeh is an illustrator/painter based in Brooklyn, mostly known for her oil paintings. Having recently branched out into public art as a muralist, STWTS was born out of the idea that street art can be an impactful tool for tackling street harassment. 

via Stop Telling Women To Smile.

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Living Black History: The Revolution in Black Studies – YouTube

Published on Apr 14, 2014

Manning Marable describes how African American studies must evolve by the midpoint in this century if it is to be a legitimate and relevant project.

via Living Black History: The Revolution in Black Studies – YouTube.

Black Wall Street Pt 2 Of 2 – YouTube | Black History 2015

Black Wall Street Clears The Myth That African Americans Never Acquired Wealth In America.

via Black Wallstreet Pt 2 Of 2 – YouTube.

Black Wall Street Pt 1 Of 2 – YouTube | Black History 2015

Black Wall Street Clears The Myth That African Americans Never Acquired Wealth In America.

via Black Wallstreet Pt 1 Of 2 – YouTube.

Black Panthers Revisited – Video – NYTimes.com

Black Panthers Revisited

BY Stanley Nelson and Laurens Grant | Jan. 22, 2015 | 7:18

This short documentary explores what we can learn from the Black Panther party in confronting police violence 50 years later.

via Black Panthers Revisited – Video – NYTimes.com.

Cops Gone Wild: Domestic Terrorist Edition [Full Documentary] 2014 – YouTube

Cops Gone Wild: Domestic Terrorist Edition [Full Documentary] 2014

via Cops Gone Wild: Domestic Terrorist Edition [Full Documentary] 2014 – YouTube.

Killer cops, drone wars and the crisis of democracy – Salon.com

2014 violence

Racism and its close cousin xenophobia are ingredients baked into the slave morality that afflicts so many white Americans, feeding a persecution complex and a sense of permanent aggrievement among the most historically privileged demographic group on the planet. (Yes, there are millions of poor whites, and they have good reason to lament their marginal, forgotten status. They also have a strong tendency to look for enemies in the wrong places.) Crime is at or near all-time lows, employment is high, many consumer goods are cheaper than ever before and the United States has not experienced a major attack by foreign terrorists in 13 years. Given all that, it is crucial to conceal the real source of middle-class and working-class America’s worsening anomie: the vast gulf of inequality between the super-rich and the rest of us, along with the stagnant wages, declining benefits and longer work weeks confronted by ordinary people.

As the black radical philosopher Frantz Fanon observed in the early 1960s, racism becomes a tool in the hands of the masters, used to pit different sectors of the oppressed against each other. He was talking about the European working class and its reluctance to join forces with the anti-colonial struggle in Africa, but we face a version of the same problem today. This week I watched an eerie and powerful new collage film from Swedish documentarian Göran Hugo Olsson called “Concerning Violence,” which is inspired by Fanon’s revolutionary classic “The Wretched of the Earth” (a book not as far away from Nietzsche as you might suppose). The film is an essayistic and aphoristic assemblage of archival footage from the ‘60s, ‘70s and ‘80s, opening a window onto various episodes from that little-understood and profoundly important period of post-colonial and anti-colonial history in Africa. But it also struck me as a distorted mirror reflecting our own situation, which has elements of internal colonialism (with respect to the poorest elements of our population), and an external neo-colonialism, although held at a great distance and largely invisible.

via Killer cops, drone wars and the crisis of democracy – Salon.com.

Anonymous Release New Video Warning Ferguson Police And KKK: ‘We Are The Law Now’ | #OYRchallenge


A video surfaced Thursday reportedly released by the hacker group Anonymous warning Ferguson, Missouri police officers and the Ku Klux Klan to remain peaceful and refrain from using violence against local protesters.

Anonymous, an unidentified group of online activists against racism and violence, published the video after they launched denial of service attacks to take down a site associated with the KKK and seized two Twitter accounts earlier this week. The actions were in response to deadly threats the white supremacist group made to demonstrators in Ferguson.

The hacker collective refers to this series of attacks — which has also unmasked the identities of alleged KKK members — as part of a campaign recognized as #operationKKK or #opKKK.

via Anonymous Release New Video Warning Ferguson Police And KKK: ‘We Are The Law Now’.

3 lessons from hip-hop history every activist should know – YouTube | Jay Smooth

Published on Nov 18, 2014

This is our new bimonthly video series, The Illipsis, written, starring and produced by DJ, video essayist and cultural critic Jay Smooth.In this first episode, Jay deconstructs the history of hip-hop to illuminate how young activists can continue challenging and reshaping the status quo today.

via 3 lessons from hip-hop history every activist should know – YouTube.

The Revolution Will Not Be Funded: Beyond the Non-Profit Industial Complex – Ruthie Gilmore – YouTube | #OYRchallenge


Professor Ruthie Gilmore speaking at the The Revolution Will Not Be Funded:Beyond The Non-Profit Industrial Complex conference, which was held April 30 – May 1, 2004 at the University of California-Santa Barbara.

via The Revolution Will Not Be Funded: Beyond the Non-Profit Industial Complex – Ruthie Gilmore – YouTube.