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My Christmas Gift from Michelle Smith – my New Soul Sister. 

Just before the holidays, most teaching professionals gripe about grading papers on social media. Professor Smith’s experience is going viral and garnered at least two articles by online publications, besides the entry in her own blog entitled, “Maybe We Do Need White History Month or Millennials Don’t Know Shit About Slavery or Picking Appropriate Essay Topics or Being a Black English Adjunct Sucks Sometimes–Merry Christmas”.

Smith reviews an essay on the benefits of slavery turned in by one of her students with a thought provoking essay of her own. For a young adult to determine any social or political benefit from slavery to African Americans is disturbing. We have not done our jobs. Do we seem too complacent in our damage and recovery? Smith’s essay lays groundwork for new national conversations, if we would only listen.

This is definitely going to be a Merry, Merry Christmas.

Source: Maybe We Do Need White History Month or Millennials Don’t Know Shit About Slavery or Picking Appropriate Essay Topics or Being a Black English Adjunct Sucks Sometimes–Merry Christmas

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The Myth of Black Buying Power Discussed

The campaign to future economic reciprocity among African American banks, businesses and communities sparks another debate – is it worth the effort. Do we have the power to build a Black economic power base? Some say yes, — others suggest not.

With increased protests in the streets and exploration of solutions for continuing police violence and persistent inequality has come renewed calls for the deployment of collective economic strength, particularly in the form of boycotts and reinvestment in Black banks.  This has also brought about some renewed focus on the notion of “Black buying power.”  In this edition of imixwhatilike! we spend a day in the life of explaining, discussing and debating what i call The Myth of Black Buying Power.  The myth claims Black America has more than $1 trillion in annual spending power which confuses many about the nature of capitalism, economic inequality or the meaning of “power” itself.  With the help of radio hosts Jennifer Bryant, Netfa Freeman, Garrett Harris (WPFW 89.3 FM) and Eugene Puryear (Sputnik Radio) – and even an on-air debate with B. Doyle Mitchell Jr., president and CEO,

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The Unspoken Response to Black Lives Matter vs Black on Black Crime and Other Maladies Black | Habari Gani, America!

A worthy read is “Nobody: Casualties of America’s War on the Vulnerable, from Ferguson to Flint and Beyond” by Marc Lamont Hill, Morehouse University professor and new addition to the morning radio show the “Breakfast Club.”

In an interviewMarc Lamont Hill for AOL BUILD, Hill said it. Within the few minutes allowed, he said what many of the socially conscious are thinking when sidelined from the Black Lives Matter agenda with the discussion of Black on Black crime and Black disobedience.  Hill states that “People who even if they don’t get killed by state violence through the form of bullets, they’re still committed to … slow death row – the death of poverty…

I  read at least five newspapers per day. Electronic media allows not only the authors response to a situation, but included are the public responses as well. From the death of Trayvon Martin in February 2012 to the more recent deaths of Alton Sterling and Philandro Castile, journalist and public commentators spoke within the confines of police and victim, prejudice and privilege, law and order. The policy driven isolation and destruction of Black economy creating targets of Black men and women never came into focus during these discussions – until now.

Before we continue our discussions of policy and practice, read “Nobody: Casualties of America’s War on the Vulnerable, from Ferguson to Flint and Beyond.”

View a snippet of Marc Lamont Hills AOL interview here at NewBlackMan (in Exile):

Source: Marc Lamont Hill Talks New Book ‘Nobody: Casualties of America’s War on the Vulnerable…’ | NewBlackMan (in Exile)

Michael Eric Dyson’s Death in Black and White | The New York Times

Notes from the cliff: While creeping around the past week of horrors, many are writing, talking, and crying it out. Social media keeps me aware that our young are worried about the narratives guiding their future.
The noble curtly announce their absence or prayer time from the conversation, instead of quietly slinking back into their mud-holes.
Still others wait for the book announcement to appear and the photo ops at book signings; still grinning and smelling like death.
Few will read the many articles like Death in Black and White – The New York Times in honest obscurity to define their place in the blood and stink surrounding us. But I we must try.

We cannot hate you, not really, not most of us; that is our gift to you. We cannot halt you; that is our curse. ~ Michael Eric Dyson

Source: Death in Black and White – The New York Times

Were Alton Sterling and Philando Castile Victims of Domestic Violence Syndrome? | Habari Gani, America!

One writer, Miriam Axel-Lute, clearly gets what even some in the African American community do not. Domestic Violence perpetrators always – always give you parameters that will prevent them from abusing you, which change over time and situation.

Axel-Lute and the Albany, New York community are stunned by the latest Albany Police Department and area attorney’s presentation given before teenagers this week. I could only imagine how some concerned parents accepted the frank admittance by both entities that we are going to run your life into the ground, given the opportunity.

Lute’s article,Albany Cops Sound Like Abusive Spouses in Teen Workshop states: 

“There’s this pattern that happens with abusive spouses. They often explain to their victims how to behave so they won’t get beaten up again. All the victim needs to do is give them proper respect, not burn their dinner, remember to leave out their slippers at the right place, never buy the wrong brand of toothpaste, never make them feel like they are being laughed at, never give them attitude or make them mad. And then, supposedly, they’ll be safe.”

One female teenager, quoted in the Time Union journalist Paul Grondahl‘s article, “Albany teens hear raw talk about police stops” asks, “Are all cops hot heads? … They all seem so aggressive in the videos.”

According to Grondahl’s article (complete with video segments), the aggression and confusing commentary championed by attorneys and law enforcement, one of which was whether to comply or ask for an attorney, only frustrated the young audience further. We must understand that confusion is how the domestic abuser wins every time — until he kills you.  Axel-Lute may have hit on something politicians, pundits, and communities side step in their attempts to stop our national “domestic violence.”

Read both articles by Axel-Lute and Grondahl following the links below:

Source: Albany Cops Sound Like Abusive Spouses in Teen WorkshopAlbany teens hear raw talk about police stops

#BlackExcellence: Alice Walker Pens Beautiful Poem For Jesse Williams — HelloBeautiful

Source: Walter McBride / Getty Jesse Williams’ recent BET Awards speech on Black liberation and racism woke up America and garnered new fans–including famed writer and activist Alice Walker. The Color Purple author inspired by the Grey’s Anatomy star, she wrote a powerful poem and posted it on her website. Here It Is addresses the…

via #BlackExcellence: Alice Walker Pens Beautiful Poem For Jesse Williams — HelloBeautiful

Africa is best at wasting talent: WEF

CAPE TOWN – Rich and poor countries alike are missing huge opportunities when it comes to making the most of their populations’ economic potential, especially those in Sub-Saharan Africa, according to the World Economic Forum’s Human Capital Report 2016 published on Tuesday.

Worldwide, an average of just 65 percent of talent is being optimised during all stages of working life through education, skills development and deployment, the report says.

The Sub-Saharan African region ranks lowest, with an overall average score of 55.44 for the 26 countries ranked. Only one other region, South Asia, falls below the 60 percent average.

But South Africa, Zambia, Ghana and Mauritius score better than the Middle East and North Africa regional average.

Source: Africa is best at wasting talent: WEF

Jesse Williams Wants You To ‘Stay Woke’ In New Film On Black Lives Matter | HuffPost, Black Voices

STAY WOKE: The Black Lives Matter Movement, a Jesse Williams production.

“Black Lives Matter is in many ways, in its adolescence,” Williams told The Huffington Post about his involvement in the film and his thoughts on various aspects about the movement. He discussed with HuffPost the birth of the #BlackLivesMatter hashtag, how it subsequently swept the Internet by storm and how the hashtag helped to bring about real change. He also highlighted the daunting feat the movement’s participants have in figuring out how to create lasting change. 

Catch the rest of the article here: STAY WOKE

Source: Jesse Williams Wants You To ‘Stay Woke’ In New Film On Black Lives Matter

Interview: Former Ohio State Senator Nina Turner challenges the Black Vote | Democracy in Color

An interview by Democracy in Color‘s Aimee with former Ohio State Senator Nina Turner, Leader of the Progressive Movement and Bernie Sanders Supporter:

Turner addresses the history of the Black Vote and why we are not seriously courted by Democrats in politics or policy, most especially in this coming General Election.

“I want to be proposed to, I want to get the ring. But because we are so predictable in our voting patterns, people who run for office — whether it is the Clintons or anybody else who is a Democrat — they don’t have to court us substantively, and we certainly don’t get the ring,” says Turner

“When A. Phillip Randolph, the labor leader of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, threatened President Roosevelt and said, “You are going to do something for the Black community or I’m going to march on you.” This was in the ’40s, before the March on Washington in the ’60s. The president didn’t want to see that, so he negotiated and we got something tangible for generations to come, for our vote. I don’t see us getting anything — the collective us — from Democrats that’s tangible for generations to come. That is the problem that I have.”

Turner challenges us to vote for our future, not our fear.

The interview in its entirety at: Democracy in Color

Source: Nina Turner: Leader of the American Progressive Movement — Democracy in Color

While the Global Village is Expanding, Some Are Burning Their Huts. ..

To find the origins of the referendum—the practice of putting questions (rather than candidates) to popular vote, which made news this week when Britain voted to leave the European Union—you have to go way back. “There was a Roman historian called Tacitus who wrote that on the small matters the governors decide, on important matters…

via How Referendums Like the Brexit Vote Became a Thing — TIME