students

Were Alton Sterling and Philando Castile Victims of Domestic Violence Syndrome? | Habari Gani, America!

One writer, Miriam Axel-Lute, clearly gets what even some in the African American community do not. Domestic Violence perpetrators always – always give you parameters that will prevent them from abusing you, which change over time and situation.

Axel-Lute and the Albany, New York community are stunned by the latest Albany Police Department and area attorney’s presentation given before teenagers this week. I could only imagine how some concerned parents accepted the frank admittance by both entities that we are going to run your life into the ground, given the opportunity.

Lute’s article,Albany Cops Sound Like Abusive Spouses in Teen Workshop states: 

“There’s this pattern that happens with abusive spouses. They often explain to their victims how to behave so they won’t get beaten up again. All the victim needs to do is give them proper respect, not burn their dinner, remember to leave out their slippers at the right place, never buy the wrong brand of toothpaste, never make them feel like they are being laughed at, never give them attitude or make them mad. And then, supposedly, they’ll be safe.”

One female teenager, quoted in the Time Union journalist Paul Grondahl‘s article, “Albany teens hear raw talk about police stops” asks, “Are all cops hot heads? … They all seem so aggressive in the videos.”

According to Grondahl’s article (complete with video segments), the aggression and confusing commentary championed by attorneys and law enforcement, one of which was whether to comply or ask for an attorney, only frustrated the young audience further. We must understand that confusion is how the domestic abuser wins every time — until he kills you.  Axel-Lute may have hit on something politicians, pundits, and communities side step in their attempts to stop our national “domestic violence.”

Read both articles by Axel-Lute and Grondahl following the links below:

Source: Albany Cops Sound Like Abusive Spouses in Teen WorkshopAlbany teens hear raw talk about police stops

Advertisements

‘Dear White Academics …’ | Vitae

“Wow, you’re so articulate.”
“Are you the cleaning lady?”
“Do you have a Ph.D.?”
“James? What’s your real Asian name?”

Dear White People

You’ve heard or heard of statements like these. Students and scholars call them “microaggressions”—casual, everyday comments and questions that might not rise to the level of a verbal altercation or a physical beatdown, but are rooted in stereotyping and racially-biased assumptions nevertheless.

Some microaggressions are obvious. But it can take a well-tuned ear to perceive the subtleties and nuances in others. The people delivering coded comments might actually intend them as compliments, not realizing that they are holding on to stereotypes that are invisible to them.

As a returning African American and retired Systems Engineer student, after 20 years absence from academia, these microaggressions, not only by whites but surprisingly from other African American professors, raised my blood pressure. The first two weeks with an unfamiliar professor was a tight rope walk between maintaining respect for their proficiency and battling their cultural and class ignorance.

I must add to the author’s short list of microaggressions with these.

The patronizing African American father,
“I know your struggle. We were so poor…”

First day of class,
“You might want to take an easier class.”

The Master’s research meeting,
“We may want to refer to … for more information on the local drug scene, street life, …”

Your eyes bulge, but hopefully not enough to be that one person every African American does not want to stereotype at these venues. The Angry Black Woman or Man. So you recline, count the hours until you can make a hasty retreat, count up how much you are spending for this abuse, open your books at night and push the demons away to let in empirical evidence that this is all not a waste of time. This article places the response to these microaggressions better than I ever could.

“The greatest microaggression, some say, is that they feel unable to express their displeasure. That’s because they don’t want to be perceived as “angry” people of color who constantly play “the race card.” A few others say they’ve learned not to get angry or paranoid: Microaggressions, they say, reflect the flaws of the people dishing them out. Better to invest their time and energy on working on things they can change.”

In business, there is the option of consulting attorneys in the worse cases. Academia does not afford students this option. Students are locked in by a financial and personal investment. These perpetrators know this and find no need to leash their ill-behaviors.

The article points to a book, a supplement to the film “Dear White People,” “Dear White People: A Guide to Inter-Racial Harmony in ‘Post-Racial’ America,” which hopefully all academic professionals and students will absorb. If they cannot find the time, there is also a chart or shortlist to guide them through their internal war with their past and present demons toward a more cultured future.

via ‘Dear White Academics …’ | Vitae.

Link to Dear White People: A Guide to Inter-Racial Harmony in ‘Post-Racial’ America  by Justin Simien, Ian O’Phelan on Amazon.com

Book_DearWhite People

Dear White People and the Myth of the Post-Race College Campus | NewBlackMan in Exile | #OYRchallenge

Dear White People and the Myth of the Post-Race College Campus | NewBlackMan in Exile

In this comprehensive review of Justin Simien’s first film “Dear White People,” published in “NewBlackMan (in Exile)”, Stephane Dunn teases out the academic and cultural notations guiding this redress on post-racialism. The film’s production and acceptance by the viewing public stands as a step forward in the overt race conversation. The title alone, in earlier years and still today, would have whites and fearful Blacks running the other way. Yet, “Dear White People” is making its rounds in theaters across the United States. Progress at least among some populations.

Excerpt:

Dear White People doesn’t merely copy or recycle still relevant cultural critiques about the racist imagery that infuses film and American culture though Simien certainly traverses some familiar ground – racialized representations in pop culture and warring notions of black authenticity, brought up to date with Aaron McGruder-like Boondock boldness. Dear White People adds its own chapter taking on ‘post-racial’ – ‘post-black’ contemporary discourses. However, that and title aside, its concern is with a range of competing social identities, particularly class and sexuality and the intersection of these with race. Race is as much a device as key theme.- Stephane Dunn

Similar to Ferguson, Missouri’s recent protest in the murder of Michael Brown, among other young Black men and women, some in the African American community sit astraddle the discussion of race. Our scholars and young are eager for the discussion to expand beyond academic discourse. The older and fearful or ‘conservative’ wait to mingle among the crowds that gather or recline – if a spark is not ignited. The mixed bag is historic and similar to any community. Still this historic step forward does not require the total capitulation of the African American community. The mere progress of this film speaks for itself.

Read this review. See the film. Then, bring this conversation of race and identity to your dinner table, clubs, and communities.


via Dear White People and the Myth of the Post-Race College Campus | NewBlackMan in Exile.

Talib Kweli, Dead Prez, Cornel West speak up for Ferguson at Hip Hop 4 Justice : Entertainment

Hip hop artist perform Sunday night for Ferguson October weekend protest.

Ferghiphopconcert

Excerpt:

Hip-hop artists national and local converged on small midtown concert club Fubar on Sunday afternoon in the name of Hip Hop 4 Justice.

The event alternatively titled Hip Hop & Resistance included appearances from Talib Kweli, Dead Prez, Tef Poe, Doorway, Bo Dean, Rockwell Knuckles, T-Dubb-O, Family Affair, Nato Caliph, Scripts & Screws, Nick Menn, Rebel Diaz, Aloha Mi’sho and more.

Activist-author Cornel West, in town to keynote a mass meeting at Chaifetz Arena on Sunday night as part of the weekend of protests dubbed FergusonOctober, made a surprise appearance at Fubar, as did actor Jesse Williams of “Grey’s Anatomy,” who has been vocal about unrest in Ferguson. FergusonOctober is an organized wave of resistance calling for justice and lasting change in the wake of the shooting death of Ferguson teenager Michael Brown by police officer Darren Wilson.

via Talib Kweli, Dead Prez, Cornel West speak up for Ferguson at Hip Hop 4 Justice : Entertainment.

Great Explorers – Harlem! | Indiegogo | #OYRchallenge

Middle Passage, New York is running a program, Great Explorers Cultural Arts and Literacy Program , engaging students to research their history in America. This research will be utilized by students to create scripts, dance, and other art & performance medium under the guidance of professional artist, writers, and choreographers.

How can you help? Simple donation in support of this program allows you to aid this progressive program, purchase materials, create strong minds, and attend performances and cast party. A win win! #OYRchallenge

The Great Explorers Cultural Arts and Literacy Program  is run by Middle Passage, Inc., a nonprofit organization working to educate children of color in New York City,  in particular, students who feel alienated in traditional schools with their emphasis on high-stakes testing, a foreign cultural environment and a curriculum that fails to meet the needs of a diverse group of students. 

In all our programs, we emphasize Project Based Learning so that families, teachers and community members can work together to help children develop both critical thinking and problem-solving skills — skills that set them up for a lifetime of success and achievement!

via Great Explorers – Harlem! | Indiegogo.

Darker-Skinned African-American Students Suspended More Frequently – Higher Education | #OYRchallenge

The study’s findings of a positive correlation between darker skin and higher suspension rates held even after other factors were taken into account, such as the socioeconomic status of the students’ parents, delinquent behavior, academic performance and other variables.

As research literature, the study provides a rich contextual and historical discussion of “colorism”—that is, the distinctions that have been made among Blacks of different skin tones in the United States since the days of the antebellum South.

For instance, it notes how one of the earliest uses of the term “colorism” in American popular culture was by Alice Walker, author of “The Color Purple,” who described it in 1983 as “prejudicial or preferential treatment of same-race people based solely on their color.”

via Darker-Skinned African-American Students Suspended More Frequently – Higher Education.

Dear White People – In Theaters October 17 | #OYRchallenge

IN THEATERS OCTOBER 17

Best Picture Winner at the San Francisco Film Festival

Special Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival

Now coming to theaters near you on October 17, 2014

via Dear White People – In Theaters October 17.

Five-Minute Film Festival: Culturally Responsive Teaching | #OYRchallenge

Five-Minute Film Festival: Culturally Responsive Teaching.

The changing racial and cultural landscape of America is certainly a much-discussed topic — some researchers studying U.S. Census data and demographics even say that America could be a “minority majority” country as early as 2050. While the barriers between countries continue to come down, and globalization continues, how can teachers address the needs of students from a variety of cultural backgrounds and upbringings? This collection of videos introduces culturally responsive teaching (CRT), and includes some techniques that you can use to help students from diverse backgrounds succeed together.

‘The Teacher Wars’ Author Talks Race and Gender in American Education – COLORLINES | #OYRchallenge

Scholars interested in this book may also want to research the 1960s and 70s NY policy; “live in your work community,” where NY police and teachers are still given incentives on home purchases and other amenities within the inner city communities where they are employed. This was hoped to address the timely complaint by African American community leaders that African American communities should be served by teachers and police officers of their culture. It was partially successful. Also, look up the JDL response through Brooklyn’s Union College. This is one history, Dana Goldstein would not, could not dare include in Her history. Interesting story regardless.Race and Education

What surprised you most about the history of race and education?One of the really big things that surprised me was that the roots of this “no excuses” reform ideology that is so popular today was actually in black educational theories and ideas dating back to the 19th century. We often mischaracterize those movements today as something that white people are imposing on communities of color. Yet what I found is that in the ideas of Anna Julia Cooper, Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. Du Bois—figures who disagreed with each other on a lot of things and had a fertile debate—[valued] “no excuses,” strict discipline and academic rigor. Those things were, to a certain extent, areas of agreement among black educational leaders.You can quite easily trace how the founders of the “no excuses” movement, for example the founders of the KIPP network of charter schools, Mike Feinberg and Dave Levin [who are both white], were explicitly influenced by a female black teacher who they observed using these “no excuses” strategies. And there is a translation process that happens there, where this set of ideas of was mostly being used by teachers of color with children of color. Now a multi-racial group of teachers is using these strategies. When someone from your community says to you, “Look, there are no excuses,” that is very different from when someone from outside your community is telling you “no excuses.” Although these are very old ideas, what they mean in practice today is has changed.

via ‘The Teacher Wars’ Author Talks Race and Gender in American Education – COLORLINES.

#OYRchallenge

How to Start a Homeschool Co-op for Black Homeschoolers. | #OYRchallenge

Homeschooling or private education has been thrown negative bones in this century. Yet, I remember when it was the hopes of many for their children to receive a healthy private education. While growing up in the 1960’s New York City, private education was sought after by wealthy and middle-class families. Even some poor families did without so that their children could receive premium educations. The news of protesters advocating for public education often uncovers connections to teachers unions and government organizations. Few show any sincerity, besides platitudes, for the general welfare of our African children. The statistics and news reports of violence against our children while in their care supports this. Disparaging slurs and rehearsed talking points on African American progress, news, and education further highlights the need for African American children to be educated in an African-friendly environment.  And I say this because????

Dr. Samori Camara invests in socializing African children within their culture, with the current advancements in the American society. He also recognizes the necessity for them to utilize the talents of those of like minds in the rudimentary subject matters and expanded materials. This initiative is not just for African children; it is done all over the world, by many communities, ethnicities, and religions. We still live in a system where the wealthy may choose how and by who their children will be educated, yet the poor are hounded when trying to privately educate their children. Poverty imprisons our children to learn from those who do not respect or appreciate us.

Today, we are urged by teacher’s unions, who are by-the-way champions of race discrimination in public schools, to support public education. Data is collected on failed private entities, such as some Charter Schools, to support their ragged claims to the ignorant that public education is best for our children. Not so. Our inner city public schools are a mess of calculations, re-designations, social manipulations, and traps to keep our African American communities helpless and hopeless.

Private education is best for the entire family and community. Parents and other involved adults are now responsible to forward their own education in order to supply their students and children with the most current and diverse education available, while fostering positive images of their culture and communities. Teachers are family members, friends, and local talent. Families are not sending their children off to robotics class to learn “how to work for someone else,” but are learning to seek out and appreciate their own talents within their communities.

Families I encounter on trips to libraries, seminars, workshops, and entertainment venues, take these opportunities to expand their children’s education. Education is a life experience, 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. You pay your principal, therefore he or she listens to your concerns. If you are homeschooling, concerns are addressed within your community. Your family’s life journey does not end on Friday at 3:00 pm. So why should its education begin with someone else. #OYRchallenge

Education for Liberation: The Top 20 Questions and Answers for Black Homeschoolers by Dr. Samori Camara Get it here:

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BEL8IK8

Afrikan centered homeschooling is on the rise, but we should definitely not do it alone. A cooperative can help with your Black homeschool endeavors. In the video, I cover some of the benefits. They are many more. Watch, share, subscribe.

Revolutionary Love,

Dr. Samori Camara