Racism

Freddie Gray Is Only the Latest Apparent Victim of Baltimore Police Violence | The Atlantic

This excellent article from The Atlantic explicates the historic violent policing of Baltimore citizens. The video documents an earlier incident where the charges against the defendant were dropped and restitution later paid to the now recognized victim of legalized violence. #FreddieGray #BlackLivesMatter


What’s crucial to understand, as Baltimore residents take to the streets in long-simmering frustration, is that their general grievances are valid regardless of how this case plays out. For as in Ferguson, where residents suffered through years of misconduct so egregious that most Americans could scarcely conceive of what was going on, the people of Baltimore are policed by an entity that perpetrates stunning abuses. The difference is that this time we needn’t wait for a DOJ report to tell us so. Harrowing evidence has been presented. Yet America hasn’t looked.   

I include myself.  

Despite actively reading and commenting on police misconduct for many years, I was unaware until yesterday that the Baltimore Sun published a searing 2014 article documenting recent abuses that are national scandals in their own rights.

A grandmother’s bones were broken. A pregnant woman was violently thrown to the ground. Millions of dollars were paid out to numerous victims of police brutality.

And almost none of us noticed!

So I join all who say that protests in Baltimore should remain peaceful, and I will continue to withhold judgment about Gray’s death until more facts are known.

But I also insist that Baltimore protests are appropriate regardless of what happened to Freddie Gray, as is more federal scrutiny and intervention. Although much was rightly made of Ferguson’s racially unrepresentative local leadership, the presence of a black mayor and a diverse city council has not solved Baltimore’s police problem, partly because the DOJ responded to revelations of epidemic brutality with less than the full-scale civil rights probe that some residents requested and because Maryland pols have thwarted reform bills urged by city leaders.

via Freddie Gray Is Only the Latest Apparent Victim of Baltimore Police Violence – The Atlantic.

Noam Chomsky: White America’s Cruelty to Black People Far Worse Than South Africa | Alternet

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If you listen to the rhetoric on Martin Luther King Day, it’s instructive. It typically ends with the “I Have a Dream” speech and the voting rights. And Martin Luther King didn’t stop there. He went on to condemning the war in Vietnam and to raising class issues. He began to raise class issues and turn to the North. At that point, he fell out of favor and disappeared. He was trying to—he was assassinated when he was trying to organize a poor people’s movement, and he was supporting a sanitation workers’ strike in Memphis. There was supposed to be a march to Washington to establish a poor people’s movement, appeal to Congress to do something about class issues.

via Noam Chomsky: White America’s Cruelty to Black People Far Worse Than South Africa | Alternet.

Ernestine Johnson Performs ‘The Average Black Girl’ on Arsenio Hall Show – YouTube

Published on Apr 14, 2014

Ernestine Johnson kicks off the show with an amazing and moving performance of “The Average Black Girl.” You will get chills from this performance. Booking: Aris@xceltalent.com

Website: http://www.ernestinejohnson.com

via Ernestine Johnson Performs ‘The Average Black Girl’ on Arsenio Hall Show – YouTube.

Study: Black Girls Are Being Pushed Out of School : Code Switch : NPR

Columbia University law professor Kimberle Williams Crenshaw and her associates, Priscilla Ocen and Jyoti Nanda, set out to explain in their study, Black Girls Matter: Pushed Out, Overpoliced and Underprotected.

They examined data from public schools in Boston and New York City, and the results are startling: Girls of color, and especially black girls, are subject to discipline that is harsher and more frequent than that of their white peers, and are six times more likely to be suspended than white girls. The racial disparities in punishment are greater for girls than for boys.

via Study: Black Girls Are Being Pushed Out of School : Code Switch : NPR.

A Black Mississippi Judge’s Breathtaking Speech To Three White Murderers : Code Switch : NPR

Walton goes on to explain that “there is something different about Mississippi; something almost unspeakably primal and vicious; something savage unleashed there that has yet to come to rest.” To prove his point, he notes that, “[o]f the 40 martyrs whose names are inscribed in the national Civil Rights Memorial in Montgomery, AL, 19 were killed in Mississippi.” “How was it,” Walton asks, “that half who died did so in one state?” — My Mississippi, Your Mississippi and Our Mississippi.

via A Black Mississippi Judge’s Breathtaking Speech To Three White Murderers : Code Switch : NPR.

How Much Will Black Lives Matter 50 Years from Now | Habari Gani, America!

The Black Lives Matter reading list: Books to change the world | Minnesota Public Radio News

Sitting here reading David Autin’s, ‘All Roads Led To Montreal: Black Power, The Caribbean, and The Black Radical Tradition in Canada,’ with one eye on the news articles scrolling my Facebook page. Austin writes, in 2007, of major Caribbean-Canadian players forming committees and conventions to let Montreal and surrounding areas know that Black lives matter in 1967. Austin connects no death with the  1960’s Black Canadian politicians’ spark to Black cultural and political revolution, save for the absence of African recognition within the context of European-Canadian communities. They sniffed the air of Black revolutionaries across the border in the United States and West Indian independence to the southeast of Florida. And began to crawl out of the corners for a better view.

The Caribbean Conference Committee and later the Montreal New World Group served as the first anchors for collaborations and information-sharing. Still, these were peaceful inroads – a tight, hygienic revolution, as Austin portrays it. The current, Black Lives Matter movement did not have these comforting underpinnings. Michael Brown and many other Black youths in America opened the flood gates of protests that all started out mournful and mostly peaceful; although some ended in arrests, injuries, mayhem, and most important disfiguring headlines aimed to mute the cries and wipe away blood on the streets of Missouri, New York, Illinois, California, and most other states.

I turn back to Facebook. MPRNews.org’s Digital Books Producer, Tracy Mumford, writes ‘The Black Lives Matter reading list: Books to change the world.’  The time is too short and the wounds still too wet for any great author to complete a manuscript framing the Black Lives Matter debate. The article, however, advertises for bookstores who can now clear their inventory of African and African American scholarship in one swoop. We get to argue policy and problematic verses loose in social media. We have begun to package our newest creation – bloodless and blameless.

How will historians frame the current Black Lives Movement 50 years from now? After all, Austin’s near pristine 2007 account of the 1960’s African emergence from the Canadian shadows offers nothing more than well-groomed men sitting at a chess board. The only ruffles are the snickers and snaps as each berate the other’s well-calculated move into a semblance of the Black Power and Civil Rights movements of the United States.  Will Mike Brown’s death become clothed in the rhetoric of Martin Luther King, Jr, long dead by the time Brown was born? Will anyone dig up the video account of Eric Gardner being choked to death on a Staten Island sidewalk? How will Tamir Rice’s family remember that his bones helped fuel the fire already enlightening African American children that Black lives do matter in America, —  if only to them?  And most of all, with our advanced communications, social media, and electronic publications how many years is it going to take to manage these historical events — just right?

 

Excerpt:

For Wintaye Gebru, the store’s general manager, the list hit very close to home. When the protests began, she was living in Ferguson.

“As a young, African-American woman and a Ferguson resident, I often feel that our story and the story of so many others who have lived similar lives have been hijacked or distorted by a narrative we didn’t create,” said Gebru.

“The reading list is our attempt at redirecting and widening that narrative so that it actually includes the observations and experiences of blacks in America.”

via The Black Lives Matter reading list: Books to change the world | Minnesota Public Radio News.

3 Black Adoptees Speak About Growing Up With White Parents – The Root

Rollins

The Root talked to three transracial adoptees, all adopted by white families in the 1970s, about their experiences and views on transracial adoption, as well as Costner’s new film. While all three appreciated the love and foundation their families provided, a common theme evolved: In a racially polarized society, children of color cannot be raised devoid of their history and culture. All three agreed that white families who adopt children of color need to abandon the naivete of colorblindness and deal with the racial reality their black and brown children face.

Here are their stories:

via 3 Black Adoptees Speak About Growing Up With White Parents – The Root.

Black Wall Street Pt 2 Of 2 – YouTube | Black History 2015

Black Wall Street Clears The Myth That African Americans Never Acquired Wealth In America.

via Black Wallstreet Pt 2 Of 2 – YouTube.

Black Wall Street Pt 1 Of 2 – YouTube | Black History 2015

Black Wall Street Clears The Myth That African Americans Never Acquired Wealth In America.

via Black Wallstreet Pt 1 Of 2 – YouTube.

Black Panthers Revisited – Video – NYTimes.com

Black Panthers Revisited

BY Stanley Nelson and Laurens Grant | Jan. 22, 2015 | 7:18

This short documentary explores what we can learn from the Black Panther party in confronting police violence 50 years later.

via Black Panthers Revisited – Video – NYTimes.com.