Racism

Watch the First Black Woman Who Served in the US Senate Go Off on the Confederate Flag | Mother Jones

Carol Moseley-Braun’s 2014 interview on her 1993 Senate struggle to establish a case to abolish the Confederate Flag. The titled article includes the original video of the then Senator Moseley-Braun’s actual speech on the floor of the Senate. Riveting.


On July 22, 1993, an impassioned Carol Moseley-Braun of Illinois—the first African-American woman to serve in the US Senate and its sole black member at the time—took the floor to rebuke conservative legislators including the late Jesse Helms, who were backing an amendment to secure the Confederate flag as the official design for the United Daughters of the Confederacy.

Moseley-Braun said: “The issue is whether Americans such as myself who believe in the promise of this country, who feel strongly and who are patriots in this country, will have to suffer the indignity of being reminded time and time again that at one time in this country’s history we were human chattel. We were property. We could be traded, bought, and sold.”

via Watch the First Black Woman Who Served in the US Senate Go Off on the Confederate Flag | Mother Jones.

http://www.c-span.org/video/?c4457005/senator-moseley-braun-remarks-confederate-insignia

National Review’s Racism Denial, Then and Now | The New Republic

New Republic|Politics

Courtesy of Media Matters for America, this article by New Republic compares and contrasts the media coverage of two explosive racially-motivated events, 52 years apart, by the National Review; the bombing of Birmingham, Alabama’s 16th St. Baptist Church in 1963 and the murder of 9 people at Emmanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charlotte, South Carolina this 2015 by Dylann Storm Roof. It begs to remember that “the more things change, the more they stay the same.” 

Both National Review’s 1963 theory that about a “crazed Negro” and Delgado’s notion that Roof doesn’t “look white” spring from a profound commitment to the myth of white innocence. The underlying idea is that white people have only good intentions, so horrific crimes like Birmingham in 1963 or Charleston in 2015 must somehow spring from another source, most likely a dark-skinned person.

Roof

Parallel to the idea that Roof is not white is the desire to deflect attention from Roof’s racist motivation in the church killing, the evidence for which has been steadily accumulating. “He was big into segregation and other stuff,” Roof’s roommate told ABC News. “He said he wanted to start a civil war. He said he was going to do something like that and then kill himself.”

via National Review’s Racism Denial, Then and Now | The New Republic.

Crystal Valentine – “Black Privilege” (CUPSI 2015 Finals) – YouTube

Crystal Valentine performs her poetic analysis of Black Privilege. It will amaze you. Thrilling performance.

Performing for NYU during finals at the 2015 College Unions Poetry Slam Invitational. NYU won the tournament.

via Crystal Valentine – “Black Privilege” (CUPSI 2015 Finals) – YouTube.

Biracial Beauty Queen Challenges Japan’s Self-Image – NYTimes.com

Ariana Miyamoto, Miss Universe Japan 2015

TOKYO — WHEN Ariana Miyamoto was crowned Miss Universe Japan 2015, participants said she stole the show with a saucy strut, an infectious smile and a calm self-confidence that belied her 21 years. But it was not just her beauty and poise that catapulted her to national attention.

Ms. Miyamoto is one of only a tiny handful of “hafu,” or Japanese of mixed race, to win a major beauty pageant in proudly homogeneous Japan. And she is the first half-black woman ever to do so.

via Biracial Beauty Queen Challenges Japan’s Self-Image – NYTimes.com.

Spelling Race | Colorlines

… the narrative of cultural exceptionalism is misleading and harmful. It’s safe to say that all families place an emphasis on education and want their children to succeed. However, not all families have access to resources and institutions that enable their children to do well. When we rely on culture as the reason for success, we ignore the structural realities that prevent many children of color or poor children from reaching their goals. We also end up placing the onus on families to ensure academic achievement, rather than compelling the public and private sectors to also provide valuable services and benefits that can help all children succeed.

via Spelling Race | Colorlines.

Teachers Of All Races Are More Likely To Punish Black Students | HP Blackvoices

How do we as African American’s label our implicit bias? Class.Teachers Of All Races Are More Likely To Punish Black Students

“What we have shown here is that racial disparities in discipline can occur even when black and white students behave in the same manner,” write Jason A. Okonofua and Jennifer L. Eberhardt in their paper, published in April by the journal Psychological Science. (Eberhardt won a 2014 MacArthur “Genius” fellowship for her work on implicit bias.)

It’s a pattern that might provide insight to interpersonal bias in criminal justice. “Just as escalating responses to multiple infractions committed by Black students might feed racial disparities in disciplinary practices in K–12 schooling, so too might escalating responses to multiple infractions committed by black suspects feed racial disparities in the criminal-justice system,” they write.

via Teachers Of All Races Are More Likely To Punish Black Students.

Post traumatic Disorder Dr Joy de Gruy Leary – YouTube

“We are all getting naked in this room!” ~ Dr. Joy DeGruy

Post traumatic Disorder Dr Joy de Gruy Leary – YouTube.

From – Dr. Joy DeGruy: BE THE HEALING

THE DR. JOY EXPERIENCE

http://joydegruy.com

Through lectures, workshops, seminars and special guest appearances, Dr. Joy has shined a light on the critical issues affecting society. Those who have experienced Dr. Joy in person, can tell you that they have been “stimulated, enlightened and inspired.” Dr. Joy’s seminars have been lauded as the most dynamic and inspirational currently being presented on the topics of culture, race relations and contemporary social issues. Topics include:

Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome – Effects of Slavery and Institutionalized Racism

Diversity Training

Healing Workshops

Culture Specific Models

Community Building

Violence and Gang Prevention

Michelle Alexander, author of “The New Jim Crow” – 2013 George E. Kent Lecture – YouTube

In 2013 the author of the New Jim Crow in the Age of Colorblindness, Michelle Alexander, foreshadowed the current protests, violence, and the racially-biased and hyperbolic media rhetoric surrounding it all. Listen to how even Alexander lived in denial as most professionals comfort themselves. The benefits of social media is that we are able to readily observe everyone’s complacency in the growing drama as we victimize the victim, support the manufactured policies that create a caste of the unseen, unwanted, and cast aside; or worst – remain silent.

Published on Mar 15, 2013

Michelle Alexander, highly acclaimed civil rights lawyer, advocate, Associate Professor of Law at Ohio State University, and author of The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, delivers the 30th Annual George E. Kent Lecture, in honor of the late George E. Kent, who was one of the earliest tenured African American professors at the University of Chicago.

The Annual George E. Kent Lecture is organized and sponsored by the Organization of Black Students, the Black Student Law Association, and the Students for a Free Society.

via Michelle Alexander, author of “The New Jim Crow” – 2013 George E. Kent Lecture – YouTube.

Resurrecting Black Wall Street: Trailer #2 – YouTube

Resurrecting Black Wall Street is a story hidden for at least 100 years. The story is out. Learn an intricate part of American history. See the film.


Published on Apr 8, 2015

You can pre-order the film by visiting ResurrectingBlackWallStreet.com.

via Resurrecting Black Wall Street: Trailer #2 – YouTube.

Baltimore violence follows in tragic pattern | Rachel Maddow – MSNBC

Baltimore violence follows in tragic pattern

Rachel Maddow reviews the recent history of civil unrest in response to police violence against people of color, exposed to the public by a series of mostly civilian sourced videos.

via Baltimore violence follows in tragic pattern | MSNBC.