police shootings

Were Alton Sterling and Philando Castile Victims of Domestic Violence Syndrome? | Habari Gani, America!

One writer, Miriam Axel-Lute, clearly gets what even some in the African American community do not. Domestic Violence perpetrators always – always give you parameters that will prevent them from abusing you, which change over time and situation.

Axel-Lute and the Albany, New York community are stunned by the latest Albany Police Department and area attorney’s presentation given before teenagers this week. I could only imagine how some concerned parents accepted the frank admittance by both entities that we are going to run your life into the ground, given the opportunity.

Lute’s article,Albany Cops Sound Like Abusive Spouses in Teen Workshop states: 

“There’s this pattern that happens with abusive spouses. They often explain to their victims how to behave so they won’t get beaten up again. All the victim needs to do is give them proper respect, not burn their dinner, remember to leave out their slippers at the right place, never buy the wrong brand of toothpaste, never make them feel like they are being laughed at, never give them attitude or make them mad. And then, supposedly, they’ll be safe.”

One female teenager, quoted in the Time Union journalist Paul Grondahl‘s article, “Albany teens hear raw talk about police stops” asks, “Are all cops hot heads? … They all seem so aggressive in the videos.”

According to Grondahl’s article (complete with video segments), the aggression and confusing commentary championed by attorneys and law enforcement, one of which was whether to comply or ask for an attorney, only frustrated the young audience further. We must understand that confusion is how the domestic abuser wins every time — until he kills you.  Axel-Lute may have hit on something politicians, pundits, and communities side step in their attempts to stop our national “domestic violence.”

Read both articles by Axel-Lute and Grondahl following the links below:

Source: Albany Cops Sound Like Abusive Spouses in Teen WorkshopAlbany teens hear raw talk about police stops

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Why Grand Juries Don’t Indict Cops When They Kill – YouTube

It comes down to how police see young black men.
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via Why Grand Juries Don’t Indict Cops When They Kill – YouTube.

Addicting Info – White Cop Mistakes Black NYPD Officer For Criminal And Shoots Him Dead (VIDEO)

Many Blacks and Whites are targeting Al Sharpton for his activism in the #BlackLivesMatter movement, yet he has a long history of speaking out in cases such as this while those same complainers stayed silent. May of 2009 was a dark time for all Black police officers as they spoke to fear of being mistaken for a Black criminal by white officers. The terminology used here is “friendly-fire.”


That’s right. Apparently, even being a police officer isn’t enough to keep a young black man from getting killed by a white cop. Edwards was out of uniform on a plainclothes detail — an earlier Daily News report said he was “off-duty” — and chasing down an actual crime suspect whom he’d caught breaking into a car.

Officer Andrew Dunton saw the chase, and called out, “Police! Stop! Drop it!” When Edwards started to turn around but failed to drop his gun quickly enough, Dunton shot him three times.  It happened on Good Friday, May 9th, 2009, and more recent incidents of excessive lethal force by police against black men proves we’ve learned little or nothing since then. Edwards was only 27 years old, and left behind his wife Danielle and their two young sons.

via Addicting Info – White Cop Mistakes Black NYPD Officer For Criminal And Shoots Him Dead (VIDEO).

Black Cops Fear Other Cops | Alternet

African American politicians and conservatives push our young men and women into the criminal justice system for two main reasons: lack of adequate access to industry and employment in their communities; and the need for policing by those who can, — hopefully, relate to the cultural dynamics of the community. No one provides a safe space for these minority officers once we have them in these tense positions.

Black Cops Fear Other Cops | Alternet

Similar to the national photo, every public space is socially, spiritually, and economically unhealthy for African Americans and police departments are no different. The policing-while-black stories are numerous but are rarely, and for good reason, discussed out loud until we are in tragedy. There is always the choice between protecting the brother you should love and protecting the brother who will never love you. This is now one of these times.

NYPD

“Reuters interviewed 25 African American male officers on the NYPD, 15 of whom are retired and 10 of whom are still serving. All but one said that, when off duty and out of uniform, they had been victims of racial profiling, which refers to using race or ethnicity as grounds for suspecting someone of having committed a crime.

    The officers said this included being pulled over for no reason, having their heads slammed against their cars, getting guns brandished in their faces, being thrown into prison vans and experiencing stop and frisks while shopping. The majority of the officers said they had been pulled over multiple times while driving. Five had had guns pulled on them.” – Reuters

via Black Cops Fear Other Cops | Alternet.

Where race relations stand in America – Opinion – The Boston Globe | #OYRchallenge

White response to Police killing Blacks

Ward Sutton is a New York-based cartoonist and illustrator.

via Where race relations stand in America – Opinion – The Boston Globe.

Browns WR Andrew Hawkins on wearing protest T-shirt: My heart was in the right place. | #OYRchallenge

Andrew Hawkins, Cleveland Browns, NFL

On Monday, Hawkins gathered media in the locker and spoke without notes.

He said:

“I was taught that justice is a right that every American should have. Also justice should be the goal of every American. I think that’s what makes this country. To me, justice means the innocent should be found innocent. It means that those who do wrong should get their due punishment. Ultimately, it means fair treatment. So a call for justice shouldn’t offend or disrespect anybody. A call for justice shouldn’t warrant an apology.

“To clarify, I utterly respect and appreciate every police officer that protects and serves all of us with honesty, integrity and the right way. And I don’t think those kind of officers should be offended by what I did. My mom taught me my entire life to respect law enforcement. I have family, close friends that are incredible police officers and I tell them all the time how they are much braver than me for it. So my wearing a T-shirt wasn’t a stance against every police officer or every police department. My wearing the T-shirt was a stance against wrong individuals doing the wrong thing for the wrong reasons to innocent people.

“Unfortunately, my mom also taught me just as there are good police officers, there are some not-so-good police officers that would assume the worst of me without knowing anything about me for reasons I can’t control. She taught me to be careful and be on the lookout for those not-so-good police officers because they could potentially do me harm and most times without consequences. Those are the police officers that should be offended.

“Being a police officer takes bravery. And I understand that they’re put in difficult positions and have to make those snap decisions. As a football player, I know a little bit about snap decisions, obviously on an extremely lesser and non-comparative scale, because when a police officer makes a snap decision, it’s literally a matter of life and death. That’s hard a situation to be in. But if the wrong decision is made, based on pre-conceived notions or the wrong motives, I believe there should be consequence. Because without consequence, naturally the magnitude of the snap decisions is lessened, whether consciously or unconsciously.

“I’m not an activist, in any way, shape or form. Ninety-nine times out of a hundred I keep my opinions to myself on most matters. I worked extremely hard to build and keep my reputation especially here in Ohio, and by most accounts I’ve done a solid job of decently building a good name. Before I made the decision to wear the T-shirt, I understood I was putting that reputation in jeopardy to some of those people who wouldn’t necessarily agree with my perspective. I understood there was going to be backlash, and that scared me, honestly. But deep down I felt like it was the right thing to do. If I was to run away from what I felt in my soul was the right thing to do, that would make me a coward, and I can’t live with that. God wouldn’t be able to put me where I am today, as far as I’ve come in life, if I was a coward.

“As you well know, and it’s well documented, I have a 2-year-old little boy. The same 2-year-old little boy that everyone said was cute when I jokingly threw him out of the house earlier this year. That little boy is my entire world. And the No. 1 reason for me wearing the T-shirt was the thought of what happened to Tamir Rice happening to my little Austin scares the living hell out of me. And my heart was broken for the parents of Tamir and John Crawford knowing they had to live that nightmare of a reality.

“So, like I said, I made the conscious decision to wear the T-shirt. I felt like my heart was in the right place. I’m at peace with it and those that disagree with me, this is America, everyone has the right to their first amendment rights. Those who support me, I appreciate your support. But at the same time, support the causes and the people and the injustices that you feel strongly about. Stand up for them. Speak up for them. No matter what it is because that’s what America’s about and that’s what this country was founded on.”

via ESPNCleveland.com

In demanding apologies, police unions show white supremacy is a core value | #OYRchallenge

Andrew Hawkins, NFL

While the overwhelming majority of African Americans see some level of racial discrimination and devaluing of black life in the police murders of unarmed men like Akai Gurley, Kendrec McDade, and Eric Garner, it’s become far too easy for police (and society) to deny race played even a small role in any of these homicides.

In essence, unless the police are recorded using the “n-word” or secretly walking out of a Klan meeting, they can effectively deny they have a racist bone in their body, but that’s not really how the new racism works in 2014. Racial slurs and Klan meetings are used less, but some reputable polls show the majority of Americans still hold some level of racist views against African Americans. Yet we’re expected to believe that those racist views are somehow never held by police and never play any role in the deaths of African Americans they kill by the hundreds year in and year out.

via In demanding apologies, police unions show white supremacy is a core value.

What Killed Aiyana Stanley-Jones? | Mother Jones |#OYRchallenge

Aiyana Stanley-Jones, age 7, shot in her bed by Officer Joseph Weekely of Detroit SWAT on May 16, 2010. Out of all the articles published , Charles LeDuff captures this heart wrenching saga best. Not who, but “What Killed Aiyana Stanely-Jones?”Aiyana Stanley-Jones, age 7

The SWAT team tried the steel door to the building. It was unlocked. They threw a flash-bang grenade through the window of the lower unit and kicked open its wooden door, which was also unlocked. The grenade landed so close to Aiyana that it burned her blanket. Officer Joseph Weekley, the lead commando—who’d been featured before on another A&E show, Detroit SWAT—burst into the house. His weapon fired a single shot, the bullet striking Aiyana in the head and exiting her neck. It all happened in a matter of seconds.

via What Killed Aiyana Stanley-Jones? | Mother Jones.


via RISE IN POWER: Tribute to Aiyana Stanley-Jones – A Dawud Anyabwile Speed Painting Ft. ANILIMARS – YouTube. December 13, 2014