Mommafucious: Final Thoughts for 2015, Part II

Rudin1Final Thoughts for 2015 Part II: This is part two because I know that tomorrow, there will be more uncluttered ruminations.

Facebook and Twitter Posts keep me informed. Unlike the little challenged Main St. local and national news, there are many voices. During the year they varied, became morose, battle scenes, rants then cheerleaders slip in their philosophical cheers for the day. Some are eternally happy, living in clouds. Their feet never touch the ground. We have the merchants, buy me or you will never know where it’s at. A popup IM. “Are you all right?” “How’s your day going?” “We are sisters.” “We are one.” Some send flowers and stolen memes. “Sent from the iPhone of…” Even more distant are the “I am beautiful.” “She is beautiful.” “LMAO” and the infamous “LOL.”
Twitter condenses life into 140 characters. It gives you just enough space to get to the point. Black Twitter and it’s coalescing body, Blavity has found a home at the Los Angeles Times news desk. Someone is paid to read your thoughts and track the wave a Blackness storming the globe. They are mostly young and eager to tell the world where we are at. Most interesting are the trolls that attach themselves to the #BlackTwitter hashtag simply to peek at the dang Black upstarts. Remember, if they are angry you must be doing something right.
Election year “I am running for…” Trump boasts that he paid little in advertisement. Everyone in their weakest moment gasped at his barbs, posted them in succession along with video footage of his latest interview. “Mr. Trump, would you explain …” We sit on a perch waiting for the next go round of a news cycle.
Bernie Sanders proved to me that “it’s not the dog in the fight; it’s the fight in the dog.” Lately, he asked for and raised $2,000,000 in small campaign contributions from the masses in two days. And he is still humble enough to hug Hilary Clinton. That might the reason. Another charming quality about Bernie is that when confronted by Black Lives Matter and the racial equality agenda, he didn’t do as most politicians. He didn’t lock his jaw, roll his eyes, clutch the pearls, and ignore. Bernie took note, if only in rhetoric. But rhetoric has proven to matter also.
Local politics was profane in 2015. We saw familiar faces and blood-soaked fingers pat ringwormed heads, curled their lips, and chided activists’ bad behavior. One NY politician chose to ignore. Why is that profane to me? It reminds me of the Liberal and Black politicians that can only tell the Black community all of the world’s problems are that I don’t vote. Not toxic site dumping in poor and minority neighborhoods, large and small producers spewing toxins into the air to ramp up climate change, not education disparities and marginalization, not even that they are worthless beings and don’t give a damn as long as they have a job until the next election cycle. Check history. If Blacks vote too much, “conservatives” (Oh my god, that word) burn the town down. I do vote, by the way.
I never thought “outsiders” would become the dirtiest word amid the flames of protest. But it was. One woman stood amidst a burning city and a neatly drawn chalk line to proclaim they had never had a problem in their town until outsiders infiltrated their ranks. It was clear that she was the one that posted the “Bless this house” meme that went across the country more than 60,000 times.
My timeline oozed Black historical figures and Black achievements. The greatest achievement this year, however, was the realization that despite all of the blood shed for the cause, there is still much blood left to go around. Most of it, no one will notice. They are all scrapbooking the black and white photos of those they will never emulate; pretending ties to philosophy righteousness has long put to rest. I’m waiting to see what else is contrived for Black History Month this February. Danielle Colin’s beautiful, “Dreaming in Kreyol” sits on my nightstand. I wonder how many centuries will go by before I see an academic critique. Will her photo be in color?
The most interesting are the young traversing grounds they swear are new and innovative. I once asked a woman sitting still, drinking, and smiling through her 40’s with years of destruction around her how she can do such a thing. “I’ve done all that before,” was her answer. 20 years later, I understand. That is why she sits.
Photos… oh they are called selfies now. This is my moratorium to what you missed. I read articles that claim people who post selfies are narcissistic. I think selfies tell the world how much they are missed. How small we feel in vast spaces, even in our own bathrooms. Not everyone smiles. The fearful ones sometimes but mostly never smile. The haughty contort their faces in some kind of grotesque pout mimicking their last black and white photo in the scrapbook. Still, the most grotesque are withered beings covered in masquerade hats and feathers. They try to bring it back. But bring what back? We will never know.
Videos are more time consuming but are the most revealing. The Walmart and WorldStar are the best. The police shootings informative. The baby in the cage – the worst. You might have a better take on this, but for me watching modern America go up in flames as the displaced find our borders for refuge is historic. The only difference between then and now is video. Hang a bulb on the tree and call it done.
This holiday season… Should I say holiday? Are you offended? Should I be specific, exclusive – pick my side in the war of holidays this year? Can’t I just sing because I am happy? Or do I have to choose a happiness – a mirror of yours? Ok then… I choose Christmas, Hanukkah, Kwanza, and all of the many visions of celebration the world has to offer tied in a pink and yellow box with black ribbon. I am sending it out to all of you without exclusion, discrimination, history, or -ism. This is how we prove to ourselves that we are still human – above the beast. Convention, stability in an unstable world. So preserve some of your humanity in a tree, a candle, a bowl of fruit. It makes no difference to the lion, the mouse, the elephant, the spider – they are all assured in their civility and grandeur without symbols.




Huey P. Newton Gun Club in Dallas Are Responding to Police Brutality with Armed Community Patrols | VICE | United States

The mostly White gun club, “Open Carry Texas,” planned a gun advocacy march through a Dallas African American neighborhood for July 2015. They claim it is an instructive and gun awareness mission. In this climate of church fires and the recent massacre of 9 African Americans in their church, many of these communities are wary, – and rightly so. Peculiarly, there is already an African American gun advocacy group, the Huey P. Newton Gun Club, operating since August of 2014 in open carry Dallas’ Black neighborhoods. They happen to be the wrong color and on the wrong side of the political strata to be considered advocates or instructors by the general public. Their connection with the villanized New Black Panther Party is offered as evidence that they are thugs.

But not everyone shares those views: VICE – article

Andrew, an original Black Panther, greets the gun club.

Heading away from the Federal Building, the marchers pause to take pictures of themselves in front of a large public fountain. They seem a little deflated. A middle-aged man strolling by sees the group and turns around to shake their hands. He introduces himself as Andrew, an original Dallas Black Panther. “This is the first time I’ve seen armed people—I thought it was like a military group going into infantry or something,” he says. “But then I heard them say Huey Newton, and that’s what stopped me. I said, ‘Whoa…’ It lets me know something is changing in the times.”

Aside from the politicized rhetoric surrounding the Huey P. Newton Gun Club, Vice presents a comprehensive article on the historical and present day significance of how Blacks with guns are represented in the American press. The personal perspective on gun ownership is not the issue in this piece. The question is whether constitutional rights apply to all or is this another instance where African American imagery can be degraded without community redress. How ripe is that?

A Social Experiment was posted on Open Carry USA,, testing the responses by law enforcement to white open carry vs black open carry. The results are as follows:

via Huey P. Newton Gun Club in Dallas Are Responding to Police Brutality with Armed Community Patrols | VICE | United States.

The Time Has Come to Recognize President Obama’s Game-Changing Liberal Legacy

Addicting Info – President Obama Gives Workers An Easier Way To Unionize

With only 18 months left in his term, President Barack Obama is making great strides at home and abroad.

President Obama spoke of the murder of 9 church members in South Carolina last week, Policy Mic reports:

“It was an act that drew on a long history of bombs and arson and shots fired at churches, not random, but as a means of control, a way to terrorize and oppress,” he said. “An act that [the alleged killer] imagined would incite fear and recrimination; violence and suspicion. An act that he presumed would deepen divisions that trace back to our nation’s original sin.

“Oh, but God works in mysterious ways.” From that moment on, for as long as he held the stage, Obama had become the “Reverend President.” 

via The Time Has Come to Recognize President Obama’s Game-Changing Liberal Legacy.

Baltimore violence follows in tragic pattern | Rachel Maddow – MSNBC

Baltimore violence follows in tragic pattern

Rachel Maddow reviews the recent history of civil unrest in response to police violence against people of color, exposed to the public by a series of mostly civilian sourced videos.

via Baltimore violence follows in tragic pattern | MSNBC.

How Much Will Black Lives Matter 50 Years from Now | Habari Gani, America!

The Black Lives Matter reading list: Books to change the world | Minnesota Public Radio News

Sitting here reading David Autin’s, ‘All Roads Led To Montreal: Black Power, The Caribbean, and The Black Radical Tradition in Canada,’ with one eye on the news articles scrolling my Facebook page. Austin writes, in 2007, of major Caribbean-Canadian players forming committees and conventions to let Montreal and surrounding areas know that Black lives matter in 1967. Austin connects no death with the  1960’s Black Canadian politicians’ spark to Black cultural and political revolution, save for the absence of African recognition within the context of European-Canadian communities. They sniffed the air of Black revolutionaries across the border in the United States and West Indian independence to the southeast of Florida. And began to crawl out of the corners for a better view.

The Caribbean Conference Committee and later the Montreal New World Group served as the first anchors for collaborations and information-sharing. Still, these were peaceful inroads – a tight, hygienic revolution, as Austin portrays it. The current, Black Lives Matter movement did not have these comforting underpinnings. Michael Brown and many other Black youths in America opened the flood gates of protests that all started out mournful and mostly peaceful; although some ended in arrests, injuries, mayhem, and most important disfiguring headlines aimed to mute the cries and wipe away blood on the streets of Missouri, New York, Illinois, California, and most other states.

I turn back to Facebook.’s Digital Books Producer, Tracy Mumford, writes ‘The Black Lives Matter reading list: Books to change the world.’  The time is too short and the wounds still too wet for any great author to complete a manuscript framing the Black Lives Matter debate. The article, however, advertises for bookstores who can now clear their inventory of African and African American scholarship in one swoop. We get to argue policy and problematic verses loose in social media. We have begun to package our newest creation – bloodless and blameless.

How will historians frame the current Black Lives Movement 50 years from now? After all, Austin’s near pristine 2007 account of the 1960’s African emergence from the Canadian shadows offers nothing more than well-groomed men sitting at a chess board. The only ruffles are the snickers and snaps as each berate the other’s well-calculated move into a semblance of the Black Power and Civil Rights movements of the United States.  Will Mike Brown’s death become clothed in the rhetoric of Martin Luther King, Jr, long dead by the time Brown was born? Will anyone dig up the video account of Eric Gardner being choked to death on a Staten Island sidewalk? How will Tamir Rice’s family remember that his bones helped fuel the fire already enlightening African American children that Black lives do matter in America, —  if only to them?  And most of all, with our advanced communications, social media, and electronic publications how many years is it going to take to manage these historical events — just right?



For Wintaye Gebru, the store’s general manager, the list hit very close to home. When the protests began, she was living in Ferguson.

“As a young, African-American woman and a Ferguson resident, I often feel that our story and the story of so many others who have lived similar lives have been hijacked or distorted by a narrative we didn’t create,” said Gebru.

“The reading list is our attempt at redirecting and widening that narrative so that it actually includes the observations and experiences of blacks in America.”

via The Black Lives Matter reading list: Books to change the world | Minnesota Public Radio News.

A Familiar Debate On Comedy In Which Contexts Collide : Code Switch : NPR

Prize Articles from Code Switch – NPRCharlie Hebdo

In the aftermath of the massacre Wednesday at Charlie Hebdo, the satirical French magazine, there are obviously big questions about the attackers, their motives and what it might mean for French society. For more of NPR’s coverage of the attack and of Charlie Hebdo, check out the Two-Way.

via A Familiar Debate On Comedy In Which Contexts Collide : Code Switch : NPR.

Why We Can’t Feel Black Men’s Pain – Melissa Haris-Perry – YouTube | #OYRchallenge

Melissa Harris-Perry points to examples in medicine, society, and police testimony when determining that African American pain and pain management is considered less than that of Whites during times of illness, physical treatment, and mental anxiety. 
Melissa Harris-Perry on why the recurring murders of young black men, America just can’t seem to put themselves in the shoes of black males. From Melissa Harris-Perry on MSNBC.

via Why We Can’t Feel Black Men’s Pain – Melissa Haris-Perry – YouTube.

United Nations Peacekeeper Soldiers Fire on Protestors in Haiti | #OYRchallenge

Haitian protesters attacked by United Nations peacekeeping forces. Notice that protesters are young unarmed men, demonstrating peacefully as is being done all over the globe.
Haiti revolution 12/13/2014

Haitian police and UN peacekeepers have attacked protesters with live ammo and chemical agents as several thousand opposition supporters tried to march on the presidential palace, demanding new leadership.

UN peacekeepers firing on Haitian protesters on 12/13/2014 as they protest for a new government leader.

via United Nations Peacekeeper Soldiers Fire on Protestors in Haiti.

Cornel West, Others Arrested At Ferguson Protest – NBC | #OYRchallenge

By Patrick Howell O’Neill on October 13, 2014

Activist and academic Dr. Cornel West was arrested during demonstrations in Ferguson, Mo. He was on the scene to protest police brutality against black males, including the August shooting death of Michael Brown and another incident on Saturday, another 18-year-old killed by police just miles from Ferguson.Here’s Fusion’s livestream of the protests:

via Dr. Cornel West arrested in Ferguson.

Cornel West Arrested In Ferguson: BREAKING NEWS – YOUTUBE | #OYRchallenge

Dr. Cornel West has always been the example that going to jail is sometimes a part of activism. Long time academic and activist, West was arrested during the New York City “Stop and Frisk” rally three years ago. He has brought many demanding issues to the forefront in other arrest, bucking the stigma of arrest, which usually is a quieting tool for many African Americans, especially the affluent. Princeton University might double his salary after this. He is definitely a talking point.

Over 1,000 people joined in the “Ferguson October” protest over the death of Michael Brown, shot by police officer Darrel Wilson back in August 2014. Watch the video below:

Published on Oct 13, 2014

Author and activist Cornel West was arrested while demonstrating in Ferguson, Missouri, on Monday.West was in Ferguson as part of the “Ferguson October” rally, which has been attended by over 1,000 protesters.Journalists in Ferguson tweeted photos of the incident Monday afternoon.

West had joined peaceful demonstrations at St. Louis University on Sunday night. Hours earlier, during a large mass protest service, West said that he came to get arrested.“It’s a beautiful thing to see people on fire for justice, but I didn’t come here to give a speech,” West said during a discussion on Sunday night. “I came here to go to jail.”

via Cornel West Arrested In Ferguson: BREAKING NEWS – YouTube.