International Human RIghts

Falling in Love with the Work of Black British Filmmaker Cecile Emeke | ForHarriet

Cecile Emeke

Cecile Emeke, courtesy of ForHarriet.com

I grew up listening to stories of greatness in the Caribbean seas. My formal education is in American culture. I often wondered why I trip over photos of MLKing everywhere, while Sir Cuthbert Montraville Sebastian of St. Kitts, my childhood hero, is seldom noticed. Thank you, #ForHarriet. #Cecile Emeke

Excerpt:

There is a large number of people who feel as though the focal point of black activism and black success is and has always been centred on Black Americans. With powerful Black American men and women from Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Angela Davis, to Barack Obama and Oprah Winfrey inspiring black individuals from around the world, people forget about the complexities of Black life and experiences outside of the U.S. Trying to put together a similar list of powerful Black British men is difficult. And to trying to compile a list of powerful Black British women even more so.

via Falling in Love with the Work of Black British Filmmaker Cecile Emeke.

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117 Countries Slam American Police Brutality at UN Human Rights Council

Counterculture photo

(ANTIMEDIA) In what could hardly be called a surprise, the UN Human Rights Council chastised the US over its epidemic of police violence, discrimination, needless killings, and general neglect, following through with recommendations made in its first review in 2010.

The Universal Periodic Review (UPR) takes place every four years to scrutinize the human and civil rights practices of each of the UN’s 193 member nations. Delegates from 117 countries took the opportunity to lambaste the US’ record of civil rights violations exacted by its brutal and racist police forces.

via 117 Countries Slam American Police Brutality at UN Human Rights Council.

UCLA female faculty faced ‘demeaning’ mistreatment, probe finds – LA Times

UCLA female faculty faced 'demeaning' mistreatment, probe finds - LA Times

In the letter, Hiatt wrote that he brought in an external investigator to look into the complaints, interview current and former faculty and review documents. The resulting report was finished in October and declared that the women faculty “had correctly identified and documented the unprofessional behavior to which they had been subjected” and had brought their complaints to the attention of administrators numerous times without a proper response, he said.

via UCLA female faculty faced ‘demeaning’ mistreatment, probe finds – LA Times.

Who Suffers Most From Rape and Sexual Assault in America? – NYTimes.com

There are obvious steps we as a society can take to better support all victims of sexual violence: We have to stop blaming and shaming survivors, and to start holding perpetrators accountable. But we also need to do much more to support women in disadvantaged communities. These are the same women who have the least flexibility at work, the least access to reliable transportation, the least help with child care, and the least resources with which to pursue legal representation or medical treatment on their own. We need to do a better job of bringing health, legal and psychological services to them.

via Who Suffers Most From Rape and Sexual Assault in America? – NYTimes.com.

What Killed Aiyana Stanley-Jones? | Mother Jones |#OYRchallenge

Aiyana Stanley-Jones, age 7, shot in her bed by Officer Joseph Weekely of Detroit SWAT on May 16, 2010. Out of all the articles published , Charles LeDuff captures this heart wrenching saga best. Not who, but “What Killed Aiyana Stanely-Jones?”Aiyana Stanley-Jones, age 7

The SWAT team tried the steel door to the building. It was unlocked. They threw a flash-bang grenade through the window of the lower unit and kicked open its wooden door, which was also unlocked. The grenade landed so close to Aiyana that it burned her blanket. Officer Joseph Weekley, the lead commando—who’d been featured before on another A&E show, Detroit SWAT—burst into the house. His weapon fired a single shot, the bullet striking Aiyana in the head and exiting her neck. It all happened in a matter of seconds.

via What Killed Aiyana Stanley-Jones? | Mother Jones.


via RISE IN POWER: Tribute to Aiyana Stanley-Jones – A Dawud Anyabwile Speed Painting Ft. ANILIMARS – YouTube. December 13, 2014

United Nations Peacekeeper Soldiers Fire on Protestors in Haiti | #OYRchallenge

Haitian protesters attacked by United Nations peacekeeping forces. Notice that protesters are young unarmed men, demonstrating peacefully as is being done all over the globe.
 
Haiti revolution 12/13/2014

Haitian police and UN peacekeepers have attacked protesters with live ammo and chemical agents as several thousand opposition supporters tried to march on the presidential palace, demanding new leadership.

UN peacekeepers firing on Haitian protesters on 12/13/2014 as they protest for a new government leader.

via United Nations Peacekeeper Soldiers Fire on Protestors in Haiti.

Black Neighborhood Unites to Open a Grocery Store | Techyville | #OYRchallenge

This is the America I remember. With all of the haggling over politics and city officials doing their jobs appropriately, folks are getting tired of waiting. One New Black Wall St. GoFundMe campaign by the residents of Moodus, Ct, mainly Oya – Tef Shu, are bidding on an abandoned town up for auction in Connecticut to build a complete New Black Wall St community.

…for the empowerment of our people, and to create a front for independant black owned businesses to establish themselves. This is also a time for us to create housing for the black community , create schooling that is for us and taught by us , also a golden opportunity for us to practice agriculture and produce fresh and all natural foods.

Their campaign has taken in an added $1,000 in the last two hours, while I researched other action-oriented communities. We can only imagine how much more their campaign will garner before I finish this post. Habari  Gani, America! salutes your efforts.

Another move forward is by the Renaissance Community Co-op, a Black northeast Greensboro, North Carolina neighborhood, who are without a local grocery market. The residents decided it was time to band together and open one of their own. The video and excerpt from the titled Kacie Whaley article explains it all.

This is what happens when good people get sick and tired of the same ole thing pushed on them the same ole way.

In 2012, community members and leaders gathered  to form the Renaissance Co-op Committee RCC.  The RCC dedicated themselves to learning the ins and outs of opening and maintaining a cooperative grocery store, according to the store’s webpage.

In 2013, the RCC elected its Board of Directors for what would become the Renaissance Community Co-op, including a black president.

The aim of the community-owned store is to provide Greensboro with “healthy foods at affordable prices and [commit to] locally sourced foods, community education and dignified jobs,” the store’s webpage reads.

The co-op is serious about being committed to providing its workers with a livable wage.  They are starting their employees out with a wage of $10 per hour.The store is projected to open its doors officially in 2015, but for now, they are preparing for that day with community meetings and newsletters.  They are also taking donations and seeking those interested in becoming co-owners.

The co-op created a video called “We Want Co-op” in which members of the community, both young and old, express their desire to have a grocery store that citizens own and that they “can walk to.”

via Black Neighborhood Unites to Open a Grocery Store | Techyville.

‘Dear White Academics …’ | Vitae

“Wow, you’re so articulate.”
“Are you the cleaning lady?”
“Do you have a Ph.D.?”
“James? What’s your real Asian name?”

Dear White People

You’ve heard or heard of statements like these. Students and scholars call them “microaggressions”—casual, everyday comments and questions that might not rise to the level of a verbal altercation or a physical beatdown, but are rooted in stereotyping and racially-biased assumptions nevertheless.

Some microaggressions are obvious. But it can take a well-tuned ear to perceive the subtleties and nuances in others. The people delivering coded comments might actually intend them as compliments, not realizing that they are holding on to stereotypes that are invisible to them.

As a returning African American and retired Systems Engineer student, after 20 years absence from academia, these microaggressions, not only by whites but surprisingly from other African American professors, raised my blood pressure. The first two weeks with an unfamiliar professor was a tight rope walk between maintaining respect for their proficiency and battling their cultural and class ignorance.

I must add to the author’s short list of microaggressions with these.

The patronizing African American father,
“I know your struggle. We were so poor…”

First day of class,
“You might want to take an easier class.”

The Master’s research meeting,
“We may want to refer to … for more information on the local drug scene, street life, …”

Your eyes bulge, but hopefully not enough to be that one person every African American does not want to stereotype at these venues. The Angry Black Woman or Man. So you recline, count the hours until you can make a hasty retreat, count up how much you are spending for this abuse, open your books at night and push the demons away to let in empirical evidence that this is all not a waste of time. This article places the response to these microaggressions better than I ever could.

“The greatest microaggression, some say, is that they feel unable to express their displeasure. That’s because they don’t want to be perceived as “angry” people of color who constantly play “the race card.” A few others say they’ve learned not to get angry or paranoid: Microaggressions, they say, reflect the flaws of the people dishing them out. Better to invest their time and energy on working on things they can change.”

In business, there is the option of consulting attorneys in the worse cases. Academia does not afford students this option. Students are locked in by a financial and personal investment. These perpetrators know this and find no need to leash their ill-behaviors.

The article points to a book, a supplement to the film “Dear White People,” “Dear White People: A Guide to Inter-Racial Harmony in ‘Post-Racial’ America,” which hopefully all academic professionals and students will absorb. If they cannot find the time, there is also a chart or shortlist to guide them through their internal war with their past and present demons toward a more cultured future.

via ‘Dear White Academics …’ | Vitae.

Link to Dear White People: A Guide to Inter-Racial Harmony in ‘Post-Racial’ America  by Justin Simien, Ian O’Phelan on Amazon.com

Book_DearWhite People

Americans Believe Inequality Is The World’s Greatest Threat. Other Countries Think Differently

Surveyors from the Pew Research Center asked thousands of participants in more than 40 countries to select what posed the “greatest threat to the world” out of five possible options. The results, published last week, showed that their answers were far from unanimous.

Country/Greatest threat Plot graph

In general, the study suggests that global security risks are viewed through a regional or national prism. Rather than being afraid of the unknown, people generally chose the threats closest to home. Those surveyed in western Europe, for instance, mostly agreed that inequality poses the greatest threat out of the possible options of inequality; nuclear weapons; ethnic and religious hatred; pollution and environment; and AIDS and infectious diseases.

via Americans Believe Inequality Is The World’s Greatest Threat. Other Countries Think Differently.

2007 – 2014 Global comparisons.

2007 & 2014 Global comparison