Homeschooling

Stop blaming black parents for underachieving kids – The Washington Post | #OYRchallenge

For decades, the fault in education disparities between low-income whites and  African Americans was thrown atop the African American parents and parenting skills. They are not equip to raise children to think critically, engage literature, and calculate, – some said. The some included government officials, teacher’s unions, and even Black officials. Maybe this article will set them straight. African American children

Mayors, teachers unions, and news commentators have boiled down the academic achievement gap between white and black students to one root cause: parents. Even black leaders and barbershop chatter target “lazy parents” for academic failure in their communities, dismissing the complex web of obstacles that assault urban students daily.

via Stop blaming black parents for underachieving kids – The Washington Post.

Five-Minute Film Festival: Culturally Responsive Teaching | #OYRchallenge

Five-Minute Film Festival: Culturally Responsive Teaching.

The changing racial and cultural landscape of America is certainly a much-discussed topic — some researchers studying U.S. Census data and demographics even say that America could be a “minority majority” country as early as 2050. While the barriers between countries continue to come down, and globalization continues, how can teachers address the needs of students from a variety of cultural backgrounds and upbringings? This collection of videos introduces culturally responsive teaching (CRT), and includes some techniques that you can use to help students from diverse backgrounds succeed together.

How to Start a Homeschool Co-op for Black Homeschoolers. | #OYRchallenge

Homeschooling or private education has been thrown negative bones in this century. Yet, I remember when it was the hopes of many for their children to receive a healthy private education. While growing up in the 1960’s New York City, private education was sought after by wealthy and middle-class families. Even some poor families did without so that their children could receive premium educations. The news of protesters advocating for public education often uncovers connections to teachers unions and government organizations. Few show any sincerity, besides platitudes, for the general welfare of our African children. The statistics and news reports of violence against our children while in their care supports this. Disparaging slurs and rehearsed talking points on African American progress, news, and education further highlights the need for African American children to be educated in an African-friendly environment.  And I say this because????

Dr. Samori Camara invests in socializing African children within their culture, with the current advancements in the American society. He also recognizes the necessity for them to utilize the talents of those of like minds in the rudimentary subject matters and expanded materials. This initiative is not just for African children; it is done all over the world, by many communities, ethnicities, and religions. We still live in a system where the wealthy may choose how and by who their children will be educated, yet the poor are hounded when trying to privately educate their children. Poverty imprisons our children to learn from those who do not respect or appreciate us.

Today, we are urged by teacher’s unions, who are by-the-way champions of race discrimination in public schools, to support public education. Data is collected on failed private entities, such as some Charter Schools, to support their ragged claims to the ignorant that public education is best for our children. Not so. Our inner city public schools are a mess of calculations, re-designations, social manipulations, and traps to keep our African American communities helpless and hopeless.

Private education is best for the entire family and community. Parents and other involved adults are now responsible to forward their own education in order to supply their students and children with the most current and diverse education available, while fostering positive images of their culture and communities. Teachers are family members, friends, and local talent. Families are not sending their children off to robotics class to learn “how to work for someone else,” but are learning to seek out and appreciate their own talents within their communities.

Families I encounter on trips to libraries, seminars, workshops, and entertainment venues, take these opportunities to expand their children’s education. Education is a life experience, 24 hours per day, 7 days per week. You pay your principal, therefore he or she listens to your concerns. If you are homeschooling, concerns are addressed within your community. Your family’s life journey does not end on Friday at 3:00 pm. So why should its education begin with someone else. #OYRchallenge

Education for Liberation: The Top 20 Questions and Answers for Black Homeschoolers by Dr. Samori Camara Get it here:

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00BEL8IK8

Afrikan centered homeschooling is on the rise, but we should definitely not do it alone. A cooperative can help with your Black homeschool endeavors. In the video, I cover some of the benefits. They are many more. Watch, share, subscribe.

Revolutionary Love,

Dr. Samori Camara