Health

Your Brain on Poverty: Why Poor People Seem to Make Bad Decisions – The Atlantic

poverty

As Andrew Golis points out, this might suggest something even deeper than the idea that poverty’s stress interferes with our ability to make good decisions. The inescapability of poverty weighs so heavily on the author that s/he abandons long-term planning entirely, because the short term needs are so great and the long-term gains so implausible. The train is just not coming. What if the psychology of poverty, which can appear so irrational to those not in poverty, is actually “the most rational response to a world of chaos and unpredictable outcomes,” he wrote.

None of this is an argument against poorer families trying to save or plan for the long-term. It’s an argument for context. As Eldar Shafir, the author of the Science study, told The Atlantic CitiesEmily Badger: “All the data shows it isn’t about poor people, it’s about people who happen to be in poverty. All the data suggests it is not the person, it’s the context they’re inhabiting.”

via Your Brain on Poverty: Why Poor People Seem to Make Bad Decisions – The Atlantic.

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Self-Care for Black Women: A Photography Exhibit Focuses on What It Looks Like | The Root

More from The RootThe Beautiful Project

The Beautiful Project, a Durham, N.C.-based nonprofit, has launched an online exhibit—“The Self Care Exhibit: A Word and Image Act of Self-Preservation and Political Warfare”—to help us see, through a photographic collective, how that self-preservation Sister Audre was referencing takes shape. The organization has long empowered black girls by making them partners in reframing their images in the media, but this is the first time it is applying its unique artistic activism through photography to an issue specific to adult black women.

The concept emerged during a conversation in 2013 when Jamaica Gilmer, a professional photographer gifted in the art of storytelling with her lens, and fellow co-founders of the Beautiful Project, writer and educator Pamela Thompson and educator and activist Erin Stephens, led a discussion with their group of contributors.

via Self-Care for Black Women: A Photography Exhibit Focuses on What It Looks Like – The Root.

Post-Exposure Prophylaxis | AIDS.GOV

PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT #PUBLICSERVICEANNOUNCE :
Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) for post exposure to HIV.

May help prevent HIV.

WHO NEEDS PEP?
PEP is used for anyone who may have been exposed to HIV during a single event.

Healthcare workers are evaluated for PEP if they are exposed after:
Getting cut or stuck with a needle that was used to draw blood from a person who may have HIV infection
Getting blood or other body fluids that may have lots of HIV in their eyes or mouth

Getting blood or other body fluids that may have lots of HIV on their skin when it is chapped, scraped, or affected by certain rashes

The risk of getting HIV infection in these ways is extremely low—fewer than 1 in 100 for all exposures.

PEP1PEP2

WHAT IS POST-EXPOSURE PROPHYLAXIS?
Post-Exposure Prophylaxis (PEP) involves taking anti-HIV medications as soon as possible after you may have been exposed to HIV to try to reduce the chance of becoming HIV positive. These medications keep HIV from making copies of itself and spreading through your body.

There are two types of PEP:

(1) occupational PEP (sometimes called “oPEP”), taken when someone working in a healthcare setting is potentially exposed to material infected with HIV, and

(2) non-occupational PEP (sometimes called “nPEP”), taken when someone is potentially exposed to HIV outside the workplace (e.g., from sexual assault, or during episodes of unprotected sex or needle-sharing injection drug use)…

via Post-Exposure Prophylaxis.

Black Wall Street Pt 2 Of 2 – YouTube | Black History 2015

Black Wall Street Clears The Myth That African Americans Never Acquired Wealth In America.

via Black Wallstreet Pt 2 Of 2 – YouTube.

7 Ways to Avoid Being Brainwashed by White Supremacy | Atlanta Blackstar

Father and son

Educate Yourself

When exercising dominion over another group, the white power structure will exert control over three branches of society: the education system, law enforcement and religion. Control is extended over the institutions which shape the human mind, body and spirit. Of course you must submit to some method of formalized education, but while you’re doing so, understand that you are being fed the system’s propaganda, giving people control over your minds whose best interest is to keep you ignorant, docile and complacent. So you must step outside the system and create your own curriculum.

via 7 Ways to Avoid Being Brainwashed by White Supremacy|Atlanta Blackstar.

In demanding apologies, police unions show white supremacy is a core value | #OYRchallenge

Andrew Hawkins, NFL

While the overwhelming majority of African Americans see some level of racial discrimination and devaluing of black life in the police murders of unarmed men like Akai Gurley, Kendrec McDade, and Eric Garner, it’s become far too easy for police (and society) to deny race played even a small role in any of these homicides.

In essence, unless the police are recorded using the “n-word” or secretly walking out of a Klan meeting, they can effectively deny they have a racist bone in their body, but that’s not really how the new racism works in 2014. Racial slurs and Klan meetings are used less, but some reputable polls show the majority of Americans still hold some level of racist views against African Americans. Yet we’re expected to believe that those racist views are somehow never held by police and never play any role in the deaths of African Americans they kill by the hundreds year in and year out.

via In demanding apologies, police unions show white supremacy is a core value.

5 Powerful Ways Black People Can Help Counter White Supremacy – Page 2 of 5 – Atlanta Blackstar | #OYRchallenge

Build and Support Black Institutions

Support Black organizations whose goal is to uplift and improve the Black community. Learn about the Black community and find out what can be, should be and needs to be done to improve it. Join Black organizations and be a part of supporting the Black community. The goal of these organizations should be to provide guidance and direction to the Black community that will create a multi-generational movement toward improving the Black community.

via 5 Powerful Ways Black People Can Help Counter White Supremacy – Page 2 of 5 – Atlanta Blackstar.

Black Neighborhood Unites to Open a Grocery Store | Techyville | #OYRchallenge

This is the America I remember. With all of the haggling over politics and city officials doing their jobs appropriately, folks are getting tired of waiting. One New Black Wall St. GoFundMe campaign by the residents of Moodus, Ct, mainly Oya – Tef Shu, are bidding on an abandoned town up for auction in Connecticut to build a complete New Black Wall St community.

…for the empowerment of our people, and to create a front for independant black owned businesses to establish themselves. This is also a time for us to create housing for the black community , create schooling that is for us and taught by us , also a golden opportunity for us to practice agriculture and produce fresh and all natural foods.

Their campaign has taken in an added $1,000 in the last two hours, while I researched other action-oriented communities. We can only imagine how much more their campaign will garner before I finish this post. Habari  Gani, America! salutes your efforts.

Another move forward is by the Renaissance Community Co-op, a Black northeast Greensboro, North Carolina neighborhood, who are without a local grocery market. The residents decided it was time to band together and open one of their own. The video and excerpt from the titled Kacie Whaley article explains it all.

This is what happens when good people get sick and tired of the same ole thing pushed on them the same ole way.

In 2012, community members and leaders gathered  to form the Renaissance Co-op Committee RCC.  The RCC dedicated themselves to learning the ins and outs of opening and maintaining a cooperative grocery store, according to the store’s webpage.

In 2013, the RCC elected its Board of Directors for what would become the Renaissance Community Co-op, including a black president.

The aim of the community-owned store is to provide Greensboro with “healthy foods at affordable prices and [commit to] locally sourced foods, community education and dignified jobs,” the store’s webpage reads.

The co-op is serious about being committed to providing its workers with a livable wage.  They are starting their employees out with a wage of $10 per hour.The store is projected to open its doors officially in 2015, but for now, they are preparing for that day with community meetings and newsletters.  They are also taking donations and seeking those interested in becoming co-owners.

The co-op created a video called “We Want Co-op” in which members of the community, both young and old, express their desire to have a grocery store that citizens own and that they “can walk to.”

via Black Neighborhood Unites to Open a Grocery Store | Techyville.

‘Dear White Academics …’ | Vitae

“Wow, you’re so articulate.”
“Are you the cleaning lady?”
“Do you have a Ph.D.?”
“James? What’s your real Asian name?”

Dear White People

You’ve heard or heard of statements like these. Students and scholars call them “microaggressions”—casual, everyday comments and questions that might not rise to the level of a verbal altercation or a physical beatdown, but are rooted in stereotyping and racially-biased assumptions nevertheless.

Some microaggressions are obvious. But it can take a well-tuned ear to perceive the subtleties and nuances in others. The people delivering coded comments might actually intend them as compliments, not realizing that they are holding on to stereotypes that are invisible to them.

As a returning African American and retired Systems Engineer student, after 20 years absence from academia, these microaggressions, not only by whites but surprisingly from other African American professors, raised my blood pressure. The first two weeks with an unfamiliar professor was a tight rope walk between maintaining respect for their proficiency and battling their cultural and class ignorance.

I must add to the author’s short list of microaggressions with these.

The patronizing African American father,
“I know your struggle. We were so poor…”

First day of class,
“You might want to take an easier class.”

The Master’s research meeting,
“We may want to refer to … for more information on the local drug scene, street life, …”

Your eyes bulge, but hopefully not enough to be that one person every African American does not want to stereotype at these venues. The Angry Black Woman or Man. So you recline, count the hours until you can make a hasty retreat, count up how much you are spending for this abuse, open your books at night and push the demons away to let in empirical evidence that this is all not a waste of time. This article places the response to these microaggressions better than I ever could.

“The greatest microaggression, some say, is that they feel unable to express their displeasure. That’s because they don’t want to be perceived as “angry” people of color who constantly play “the race card.” A few others say they’ve learned not to get angry or paranoid: Microaggressions, they say, reflect the flaws of the people dishing them out. Better to invest their time and energy on working on things they can change.”

In business, there is the option of consulting attorneys in the worse cases. Academia does not afford students this option. Students are locked in by a financial and personal investment. These perpetrators know this and find no need to leash their ill-behaviors.

The article points to a book, a supplement to the film “Dear White People,” “Dear White People: A Guide to Inter-Racial Harmony in ‘Post-Racial’ America,” which hopefully all academic professionals and students will absorb. If they cannot find the time, there is also a chart or shortlist to guide them through their internal war with their past and present demons toward a more cultured future.

via ‘Dear White Academics …’ | Vitae.

Link to Dear White People: A Guide to Inter-Racial Harmony in ‘Post-Racial’ America  by Justin Simien, Ian O’Phelan on Amazon.com

Book_DearWhite People