Gender

Falling in Love with the Work of Black British Filmmaker Cecile Emeke | ForHarriet

Cecile Emeke

Cecile Emeke, courtesy of ForHarriet.com

I grew up listening to stories of greatness in the Caribbean seas. My formal education is in American culture. I often wondered why I trip over photos of MLKing everywhere, while Sir Cuthbert Montraville Sebastian of St. Kitts, my childhood hero, is seldom noticed. Thank you, #ForHarriet. #Cecile Emeke

Excerpt:

There is a large number of people who feel as though the focal point of black activism and black success is and has always been centred on Black Americans. With powerful Black American men and women from Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Angela Davis, to Barack Obama and Oprah Winfrey inspiring black individuals from around the world, people forget about the complexities of Black life and experiences outside of the U.S. Trying to put together a similar list of powerful Black British men is difficult. And to trying to compile a list of powerful Black British women even more so.

via Falling in Love with the Work of Black British Filmmaker Cecile Emeke.

Silence on Black Female Victims Weakens Fight Against Police Brutality | Kali Nicole Gross| Huff Post Black Voices

Silence on Black Female Victims Weakens Fight Against Police Brutality | Kali Nicole Gross

For starters, early data indicates black women account for nearly 20 percent of those unarmed blacks killed by officers in the past 15 years. Adding the cases of unarmed black women, women such as Tanisha Anderson, Yvette Smith, Aiyana Stanley-Jones, Rekia Boyd, and, the most recent, Natasha McKenna does not detract from crimes against black men, instead it broadcasts the extreme and unacceptable scope of homicidal police violence.

It also raises awareness about other cases that deserve justice, particularly as the trial of Rekia Boyd’s alleged murderer, Dante Servin, is currently underway.

via Silence on Black Female Victims Weakens Fight Against Police Brutality | Kali Nicole Gross.

UCLA female faculty faced ‘demeaning’ mistreatment, probe finds – LA Times

UCLA female faculty faced 'demeaning' mistreatment, probe finds - LA Times

In the letter, Hiatt wrote that he brought in an external investigator to look into the complaints, interview current and former faculty and review documents. The resulting report was finished in October and declared that the women faculty “had correctly identified and documented the unprofessional behavior to which they had been subjected” and had brought their complaints to the attention of administrators numerous times without a proper response, he said.

via UCLA female faculty faced ‘demeaning’ mistreatment, probe finds – LA Times.

7 Ways to Combat Manterrupting on Behance

“Studies show when women speak up at work, they are more likely to be interrupted and less likely to be credited for their contributions. As a result, women speak up less than their male counterparts. However “manterrupting” and “bropropriating” don’t just harm women. The pattern stifles teamwork and holds back innovation.” 7 Ways to Combat Manterrupting on Behance

7 Ways to Combat Manterrupting on Behance.

10 Learned Behaviors of a Black Girl — Everyday Feminism

This Andie Berry article published in Everyday Feminism is a necessary item in the Black Girls toolbox.

Andie Berry writes:

I often felt like my parents were teaching me to be a complacent, extremely hardworking robot-woman (i.e. the mammy archetype). I now realize that they were doing their best to teach me how to survive the intersections of being Black and a woman in a world that hated both.

via 10 Learned Behaviors of a Black Girl — Everyday Feminism.

After Ferguson, my feminism will never be the same | #OYRchallenge

The raw silence spoken of by Tina Mbachu in this article rings back to my vision of small enclaves peppered with frightened aged African Americans in America. She points to white feminists’ singular focus on their backyard and their circus. Similarly, the last few years of heightened African Americans murdered and elder malaise leaves one to gasp with each news flash, each video of gunfire spurting from a sea of blue.

After Ferguson, my feminism will never be the same

“This coming Black History month plagues me the most, as I look back over my social media posts. We have become numb to those sepia and black and white photos of the sixties. They dramatize the void between then and now. They ceased to represent hope so long ago that our Black politicians forgot what they truly represented and are to represent. And so, this paraphernalia becomes an addition to our term papers, articles, festivals, and blogs. We market them to the forlorn instead of justice. We pull them out to wipe our brows after we have sold the community to feed our bellies.

“We are fighting the same issues, yet our children are forming new ideas — new means of protest,” one social media poster said. And I grunt. Another prided the police’s traffic control prowess during our local march. I am still stunned from the vision of a young man shot to death by police just a few years ago on our streets that ended in silence; and her politicizing the mother’s grief. I digress because the she is a woman, a mother, and Black; and the message she sent is “No mother. Your son’s death is not important here. Our borrowed crinoline skirts must remain intact.””

So Tina Mbachu’s indictment against white feminist can be broadened to include a hubris and selfish protest adopted by all of us for too long. The selfish protest our children are now rejecting. The protest that used them as blame, shields, and sacrifices to what we labeled Black Progress. I hear Mbachu clearly when she states:

After Ferguson, my feminism will never be the same
Traumatic transmission across generation is the leftover pain, the unbearable weight of it on our mothers, our fathers. This grief is transferred to us across multiple vectors. The transferring of trauma is also a transferring of tasks. Once solidarity is created in the process, the new generation must now find ways to deal with the pain. We must find new ways to represent our pains, to discuss them, and to heal.

As a feminist, whether a white liberal or radical feminist, you are absolutely wrong to question how I express this pain.

via After Ferguson, my feminism will never be the same.

Remembering the Life, Love and Legacy of Audre Lorde | Irene Monroe

Huffington Post Blogger, , reminds us of Audre Lorde’s struggles and many contributions to womanist theory. Lorde pioneered the appreciation for African American womanhood and motherhood through poetry, essays, and living a life well served.

Remembering the Life, Love and Legacy of Audre Lorde | Irene Monroe

Excerpt:

Lorde was shaping contemporary feminist and womanist thought well before her seminal 1984 book, Sister Outsider, a collection of speeches and essays unflinchingly depicting black lesbian women’s lives as interlocking oppressions — sexism, racism, ageism, homophobia, and classism — and a clarion call for change and activism:

As a Black, lesbian, feminist, socialist, poet, mother of two including one boy and member of an interracial couple, I usually find myself part of some group in which the majority defines me as deviant, difficult, inferior or just plain “wrong.” From my membership in all of these groups I have learned that oppression and the intolerance of difference come in all shapes and sizes and colors and sexualities; and that among those of us who share the goals of liberation and a workable future for our children, there can be no hierarchies of oppression.

Among scholars and activists today, Lorde’s depiction of “hierarchies of oppression” is lauded as an important theory on intersectionality.

via Remembering the Life, Love and Legacy of Audre Lorde | Irene Monroe.

Brazil’s new primetime show “Sexo e as Negas” serves the white gaze | Media Diversified

Black Brazilian Women

When we first heard the news about the series, it was said that a white woman would be the principal actor. She, who behind a balcony, would observe us like animals in a zoo. She who would speak on our behalf. Our history, suffering and capacity to speak for ourselves were minor details. The narrators of our trauma and suffering, in this case a man, is someone absent from this suffering. It is not silliness, not even conservatism, not even the forces of politically correctness, as some will suggest. It is about critical care for our history and existence.

via Brazil’s new primetime show “Sexo e as Negas” serves the white gaze | Media Diversified.

14 Incredible Web Series Created By and Featuring Black Women | #OYRchallenge

ForHarriet.com‘s Michelle Denise Jackson posted this list of webisodes featuring Black women. What made this most special was the commentor’s additions to the already noteworthy list. Snuggle in. This is going to be a warm and exciting winter on the web. 

Here are a few nibbles to get you started.



Michelle Denise JacksonI am a writer, storyteller, and performer, as well as an aspiring screenwriter and producer. I have spent most of my adult life feeling various degrees of outrage, disappointment, and frustration by the limited roles and narratives available to Black women in the mainstream entertainment and media industry.

via 14 Incredible Web Series Created By and Featuring Black Women.