Finances

Ron Findley – Artist, Food-Activist, Gardener | #OYRchallenge

Ron Findley’s Ted Talk video is inspirational, while informative. Click the linkRon Findley, Gardener at Ted Talk , for his bio and further information about his program.

About Findley (Ted Talk):  Artist and designer Ron Finley couldn’t help but notice what was going on in his backyard. “South Central Los Angeles,” he quips, “home of the drive-thru and the drive-by.” And it’s the drive-thru fast-food stands that contribute more to the area’s poor health and high mortality rate, with one in two kids contracting a curable disease like Type 2 diabetes.

Starting your garden:

It is never too late to start a garden. Plants and vegetables are a versatile bunch. Some plants need the Winter periods to root and break hard casings, while others only need the Spring season to get ready to burst forth a hearty food supply. The video below may assist you in getting started.

Gardening tips from TED-Ed and some green-thumbed TED speakers

Dick Gregory|”The State of the Black Union 2008: Reclaiming Our Democracy, Deciding Our Future” took place in the Ernest N. Morial Convention Center Conference Auditorium in New Orleans. #OYRchallenge

The first of 4 videos featuring Dick Gregory.

The “Own Your Racist” Challenge #OYRchallenge

What is the OYR challenge?

African Americans have been at war – mentally, physically, economically, and socially ever since the first African was dragged from a slave ship onto the American shores. The volumes of histories (European and African American), movies, television series, news reports, studies, and other publications serve as qualitative evidence to support this claim. It has always been the strategy of Racist and their racist collaborators (African American pseudo-intellectuals) to present the resulting body count as isolated or individual incidents to be argued within the confines of the criminal justice system, race discussion forums, and/or the same models used to maintain White Supremacy. Truth-be-told, these systems have eroded and the people lax into comfort that the myth of Black powerlessness is firmly in place. They have secured the veil with a 21stcentury Bi-racial President of their choosing, replacing the Civil Rights icons. Every playbook must be revised. Our young are inundated with slave songs, yet no one drills them with the principals that created Black Wall Street and other past ultra-wealthy and sound communities. There are only so many times African American children can attend the funeral of a murdered/lynched family member, friend or neighbor, buried with Amazing Grace and “I Have A Dream,” before they stop listening.

21st century African American youths acknowledge that they are human and know that humans are fallible. In a 1992 televised panel discussion, The Issue is Race, Sister Souljah points to the need for Black empowerment and business. She also points out that every municipality has their game in place to crush African American businesses much more easily now than with the attack on Black Wall St. Crime in the African American community, the most readily used silencing cue in the racist toolbox, reflects that humanity and the substantive pressures placed on that humanity. Our young in 2014 Ferguson, MI reformed the messages of African American history that racist and African American collaborators use to teach them powerlessness. Yet, take a look at how school systems are now trying to formulate a methodology to discuss the current events in Ferguson and other cities. Why control the conversation? For the same reason our children in African American venues are taught slave songs instead of empowering verse? Our dialogue needs to be controlled to include silencing, powerless training. Some HBCU institutions provide tools to exude our power, along with that the history lesson. The intelligent heed the message, the fearful and mediocre cite statistics, the European face of government, and class conscious models of respectability politics to quell their cognitive dissonance. But that dissonance also creates race-collaborators. This is also human. Fear is human.

To get you through this challenge, we need to revisit and establish in our lives how we accommodate, participate, and sometimes instigate our own demise. Here is the catch, if your town has no industry that will support your degree as well as your Africanism, there are always government positions available. And those who become a part of the machine (thinking they can make change from within), soon become THE MACHINE, despite their good intentions. Get over them … but do not give them a pass. Racist tactics are methodical complete with literature and verbal cues that African Americans are trained to absorb and respond to appropriately. Within this context, we must not forget that on an individual level, racist are confident that whatever their mistakes, there is a cue (crazy toolbox) to combat African American claims to racist attack and the victim will disregard their rights within that transaction. Add an insecure, incompetent collaborator and you have a cocktail for a now seemingly powerless victim.

I want to give you an example of using your power effectively within this context. The necessary back story is that in our region, African Americans rarely challenge the most minute situations, so racist have an exceptional comfort zone (no visible support for Trayvon Martin in public view). As the city fell into economic decline, the mayor initiated a campaign to bring a specific immigrant ethnicity to the area from New York City (I will not name the specific population; it is not about them) to purchase property and strengthen the communities. The specific ethnicity bought into the American slovenly African American stereotype for their benefit, and similar to Rwandan (Hutu/Tutsi) conflict, they assumed a position in our communities as a buffer and caste between the racist White population and the African American community. This actually occurred right after the 1994 Rwandan genocideand subsequent literature highlighting the European strategy that set the immigrant against the indigenous population (Mamdani, 2001)

While in college, I cashed my student loan checks at a local branch of the University’s banking institution, as I had done many semester previously. I approached the teller window, and handed her the check, along with my driver’s photo ID. The teller, immigrant woman, scowled at ID, turned it over, scowled again, then asked for a second form of ID. I then gave her my University photo ID bearing the same name and insignia as on the check. Her reaction was the same as with my driver’s license. She sighed and continued to scowl, leaning on her elbow on the counter, with no movement to either decline or process my transaction. I then grew impatient and asked for the bank manager. The teller was aghast. Apparently, she felt a stool in the bank afforded her power that I had no right to challenge. I reiterated, “I have no more to say to you.  It is obvious that you are not familiar with US identifications and should not hold this position. Please call the manager.” When the bank manager arrived, I informed her of the teller’s inability to read legal documents and that such deficiencies should have been addressed at her job interview. Furthermore, her behaviors may open the bank up to future lawsuits and other damages. The red-faced bank manager “shoved” the teller aside and promptly completed my transaction. By the way, said teller is now working at McDonalds. A brightly smiling young black male has taken her place on the stool.

So here is your challenge. There are two parts.

Part I: At least once per day, approach your racial encounters with power. Inner power. Victories, no matter how small, are the key to this challenge – no hubris, retaliations, pettiness, or abuses exude power or is the aim of this challenge (put away your crazy toolbox; not needed here). This can only be done if you follow principles that we ourselves will create during this adventure. There are a few listed to get you started.

  • We are human.
  • In our humanity, we fail, but as humans we are resilient and rise stronger.
  • Remember, racist gain their power in OUR acceptance of dehumanizing media, literature, slurs, and behaviors on their part.
  • We must know the laws and devices used to counter those laws that work in our benefit, during ANY transaction.
  • We must examine, in any situation, where and how we must exude our power effectively, and when racist malaise will cause them to empower YOU.
  • Recognize oppressive methodology, no matter who attempts it – these 4 indicators may help: Insult, Deny, Threaten, and Attack (these are all a part of the verbal cues). Find them in yourself first, and then you will recognize these tactics in others.
  • Act with a sound, still mind. If you become flustered, BREATHE, SING, or whatever you have to do to get back on track. It may seem crazy to the offender or allow them to feel momentarily “uber” empowered, but the whopper you will deliver will soon change that.
  • Most importantly, never, ever take your failure to control any situation as defeat. Remember, you were trained how to be powerless (regardless of how much Black literature you read or education). Regroup and fortify yourself for the next encounter, and you will recognize more of them as you learn to live as a citizen, instead of props in someone else’s theater.

Part II: You MUST develop your own strategies through these contacts and expand on these few lines with posts using the hashtag, #OYRchallenge. Your stories are important as they energize those too weak to accept this challenge. Start with the meager crumbs I have put before you and together we will create a banquet.

The alternative to this challenge is this – continue doing what you are doing expecting different results. Hence, buy a scooter to carry your crazy toolbox. It will only get heavier.

Mahmood Mamdani. When Victims Become Killers: Colonialism, Nativism, and the Genocide in Rwanda. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2001.

These ten charts show the black-white economic gap hasn’t budged in 50 years

On the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech, we’re updating our look at how the economic disparities between whites and blacks have persisted over the past half-century.

My colleague Michael A. Fletcher published a big piece Wednesday noting that the United States hasn’t made much progress in closing the economic chasm between blacks and whites since the March on Washington 50 years ago.

via These ten charts show the black-white economic gap hasn’t budged in 50 years.

News from The Associated Press

While racial and ethnic minorities are more likely to live in poverty, race disparities in the poverty rate have narrowed substantially since the 1970s, census data show. Economic insecurity among whites also is more pervasive than is shown in the government’s poverty data, engulfing more than 76 percent of white adults by the time they turn 60, according to a new economic gauge being published next year by the Oxford University Press.

via News from The Associated Press.

Crowd Funding Tips For African American Artists | Shadow and Act

Back in the day when the rent needed to be paid, people used to hold rent parties.  At these parties, the tenant would charge a nominal fee in order to raise enough funds to ensure they kept a roof over their heads.  Today, that would be called crowd funding.  This is where a group of people put their money together to support a cause or fund a project on the Internet.

Kickstarter.com and Indiegogo.com are two of the main crowd funding sites on the Internet today.  Others crowd funding sites bursting on the scene are Rockethub.com, Newjelly.com, and Quirky.com, and Cofolio.com, which target specialty projects.

via Crowd Funding Tips For African American Artists | Shadow and Act.

 

Why Student Loans Are an Even Bigger Sham Than You Know | Alternet

At a time when overall student debt approaches  $1 trillion, the facts reveal that student loans aren’t loans, not in the traditional sense. They exhibit none of the qualities of modern consumer financial instruments, and are often sold under false pretenses, with the promise of a lifelong benefit that never materializes. We need to change how these loans work and have a broader conversation about what we should be doing — including bankruptcy and refinancing — to help future generations obtain a quality, affordable education, which is critical to our economic future.

via Why Student Loans Are an Even Bigger Sham Than You Know | Alternet.

 

What is your money relationship?

Money gives a sense of pride to some. It is a means of expressing love to others. Our money relationships can be positive depending on our motivations.
“I started thinking about everything in my life that I pay for – from my home to the food I feed my kids. I love my kids and I love my home and when I pay money to house and feed, I am really expressing love. I am Paying Attention with love in the form of money. That is the only thing that is really happening. Money is simply a means of expressing love. From this moment on, every opportunity that I have to give money or pay with money, will be intentionally Laced and Graced with unconditional love, gratitude and appreciation.

Here, I thought I was the one giving, but I received a great deal more than I gave.”

The Real IRS Scandal: Many Tea Party Groups DESERVED Scrutiny And NOT Tax-Exempt Status! (Video) – Americans Against the Tea Party

When CVFC, a conservative veterans’ group in California, applied for tax-exempt status with the Internal Revenue Service, its biggest expenditure that year was several thousand dollars in radio ads backing a Republican candidate for Congress.

via The Real IRS Scandal: Many Tea Party Groups DESERVED Scrutiny And NOT Tax-Exempt Status! (Video) – Americans Against the Tea Party.

 

Mayor Bloomberg Announces $90 Million in Property Tax Reductions for Homes and Businesses Impacted by Hurricane Sandy

Mayor Bloomberg and Finance Commissioner David M. Frankel today announced a $90.3 million reduction in property taxes for homes and businesses impacted by Hurricane Sandy. The reduction is a result of reassessments that the Department of Finance conducted to ensure that the final values reflected damages to homes and businesses, as well changes in market value following the storm.

via Mayor Bloomberg Announces $90 Million in Property Tax Reductions for Homes and Businesses Impacted by Hurricane Sandy.

Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies GRPP Summer 2013 Fellowship – CLA: Department of American Studies

The Departments of African and African American Studies, American Indian Studies, Asian American Studies, and Chicano and Latino Studies are pleased to announce that there will be two Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies Summer GRPP Fellowships in 2013. The CLA Ethnic Studies Summer Fellowship is a $4000 award that will be paid over five pay periods during the summer.

via Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies GRPP Summer 2013 Fellowship – CLA: Department of American Studies.