History

In Nigeria, Parents Tormented by Stumbling Search for Girls Kidnapped by Boko Haram – WSJ.com

Families of the missing children are still hoping for the returned of their missing children while villages and cities remain under siege. Does this historical public venture mark the beginnings of true democracy in Nigeria?

 

Mr. Ntakai was joined by more than 100 fathers, uncles and big brothers, all seeking several hundred girls taken by force from a boarding school in the remote hamlet of Chibok. The men followed a trail of hair ties and scraps of clothing the girls dropped to lead rescuers. One found his daughter’s flip-flop; another retrieved a remnant of a school uniform.

via In Nigeria, Parents Tormented by Stumbling Search for Girls Kidnapped by Boko Haram – WSJ.com.

Black Venus: The Saartjie Baartman Story – Full Film

Too often the stories of Black women never see the light of day let alone make it to film. It’s no surprise that this depiction of the life of Saartjie (Sarah) Baartman was produced in French. I, personally, can’t imagine an American or British filmmaker ever being willing to produce it. The film details Saartjie’s travel from her home in South Africa to London where she became an attraction for Europeans.

via Black Venus: The Saartjie Baartman Story – Full Film.

Remembering Rwandans Who Followed Their Conscience : Parallels : NPR

Rwandan Woman

The story begins in April 1994, at the start of the genocide of Tutsis carried out by Hutu militias called Interhamwe. As she walked down a road of recently torched houses, Mukankusi, a Hutu, met two Tutsi girls, age 15 and 17. The girls had been her neighbors before she married and moved away.

via Remembering Rwandans Who Followed Their Conscience : Parallels : NPR.

Germans vandalized Great Pyramid at Giza to ‘Prove’ Egyptians did not build it

As physicist Wolfgang Pauli famously said about a ludicrous idea, “It’s not even wrong.” There are countless glaring fallacies in Goerlitz and Erdmann’s wild theory, beginning with the fact that Atlantis never existed; it was first described in two dialogues by Plato — the “Timaeus” and the “Critias” — written around 330 B.C. The Atlantis discussed by Plato did not refer to any actual ancient empire, because the dialogues were fictional stories and fables. Suggesting that people from Plato’s Atlantis built the pyramids is like saying people from Tolkien’s Middle Earth built the pyramids, or inhabitants of Superman’s home planet of Krypton built the pyramids — it makes no sense, because they’re fictional characters. [Top 10 Wild Conspiracy Theories]

via Germans vandalized Great Pyramid at Giza to ‘Prove’ Egyptians did not build it.

Teaching Black Girls To Be Proud Of Their Beauty • Africanglobe.net

Stereotypical portrayals of Black women as overly sexualized or subservient, destitute women are pervasive on television, movie screens, and music videos, as well as most “general market” magazine covers, where primarily light-skinned Black women are featured. The schools are no safe havens from this assault on Blackness.

via Teaching Black Girls To Be Proud Of Their Beauty • Africanglobe.net.

10 Fearless Black Female Warriors Throughout History – Atlanta Black Star

Queen Mother Yaa Asantewaa

Queen Mother Yaa Asantewaa (c. 1840–October 17, 1921)

Yaa Asantewaa was the queen mother of the Edweso tribe of the Asante (Ashanti) in what is modern Ghana.  She was an exceptionally brave fighter who, in March 1900, raised and led an army of thousands against the British colonial forces in Ghana and their efforts to subjugate the Asante and seize the Golden Stool, the Asante nation’s spiritual symbol of unity and sovereignty.

Yaa Asantewaa mobilized the Asante troops and for three months laid siege to the British fort of Kumasi. The British colonizers had to bring in several thousand troops and artillery to break the siege, exiling Queen Yaa Asantewaa and 15 of her closest advisers to the Seychelles. She lived in exile until her death in October 1921. Yaa Asantewaa’s War, as it is presently known in Ghana, was one of the last major wars on the continent of Africa to be led by a woman.

via 10 Fearless Black Female Warriors Throughout History – Atlanta Black Star.

Henry Louis Gates is Wrong about African Involvement in the Slave Trade | Dr. Molefi Kete Asante

The recent essay on slavery and reparations in the New York Times (April 23, 2010) caused me to reflect on my previous critiques of several of Gates projects such as Encarta Africana, documentaries, and Wonders of the African World. Gates is a combative, assertive, and quite active intellectual. He is not a do-nothing or say-nothing person that would, given his opinions, be a good thing. Since that is not the case it is necessary to dismantle the superstructure Gates has created to defend the European’s gross violation of African humanity. Attacking the factual errors of Gates’ essay is essential for the plinths upon which the reparations argument stands.

via Henry Louis Gates is Wrong about African Involvement in the Slave Trade | Dr. Molefi Kete Asante.

When Black Men Ruled the World: 8 Things The Moors Brought to Europe – Atlanta Black Star

Ancient Moors

Black soldiers, specifically identified as Moors, were actively recruited by Rome, and served in Britain, France, Switzerland, Austria, Hungary, Poland, and Romania.  St. Maurice, patron saint of medieval Europe, was only one of many black soldiers and officers under the employ of the Roman Empire.

Although generations of Spanish rulers have tried to expunge this era from the historical record, recent archeology and scholarship now shed fresh light on the Moors who flourished in Al-Andalus for more than 700 years – from 711 AD until 1492.  The Moorish advances in mathematics, astronomy, art, and agriculture helped propel Europe out of the Dark Ages and into the Renaissance.

via When Black Men Ruled the World: 8 Things The Moors Brought to Europe – Atlanta Black Star.

15 Black Uprisings Against European and Arab Oppression They Won’t Teach in Schools – Page 2 of 8 – Atlanta Black Star

THE ZANJ REVOLT

The largest revolt by enslaved Africans was ignited by the Zanj against Arab slavers. The Zanj or Zinj were the inhabitants of the land along the coast of East Africa. They were traded as slaves by Arabs and were made to work in the cruel and humid saltpans of Shatt-al-Arab, near Basra in modern-day Iraq. Conscious of their large numbers and oppressive working conditions, the Zanj rebelled three times.

The largest of these rebellions lasted from 868 to 883 A.D., during which they inflicted repeated defeat on Arab armies sent to suppress the revolt. For some 14 years, they continued to achieve remarkable military victories and even built their own capital–Moktara, the Elect City.

via 15 Black Uprisings Against European and Arab Oppression They Won’t Teach in Schools – Page 2 of 8 – Atlanta Black Star.