Natural Movements

Encouraging Young Girls To Be Happy With Their Hair | MadameNoire #OYRchallenge

Visiting a sister claiming the Natural Hair generation came as a great surprise when on a trip to her bathroom proved her most false. The shelves, lined with cosmetics, included several boxes of chemical and quasi-natural texturizers. Even more surprising was her consistent head swivels, while noting how tight her younger daughter’s curls are compared to the looser-curled older sister.

Conversations such as these throw me head first into the bowl, but considering some of the most disturbing behavior to seeing African hair at its natural has come from African American women in social media – I simply shook my head. Gabby Douglas and Beyonce’s baby daughter took almost more hits in social media than mass incarceration and a failing public education system among young African American women. This begs the question, is natural hair a new fad that will scurry into the fabric of America after the revolution, as dashiki’s of the 1960’s and 70’s, or are African American women having a tough time weaning off of the creamy-crackAfrican American girls

Girls and women should know and be able to easily recall the texture of their natural hair. It’s disheartening to hear a woman say she doesn’t know her true hair texture because she has kept up with a choice that was made by someone else to alter her hair many years ago as a child. It’s just another way of quietly stripping away the person she is by permanently changing her look and by taking away her choice. There is no reason a girl at six or seven years old needs a ‘treatment’ for her hair with all the information out there now about how to care for natural hair of a wide variety of textures.

via Encouraging Young Girls To Be Happy With Their Hair | MadameNoire.

Chemical-free black hair is not simply a trend – Lifestyle – The Boston Globe

Chemical-free black hair is not simply a trend - Lifestyle - The Boston Globe

As RuPaul once sang, “Black hair is a revolution.” In the late 1960s, Angela Davis wore her voluminous afro as a political statement and started a movement toward natural hair. That look influenced a generation, from blaxploitation film star Pam Grier to former wig-wearing Supreme Diana Ross. Jheri Curl ruled the 1980s, but natural hair came back later with Erykah Badu’s experimentation with afros and twists and Jill Scott’s 1970s-inspired tresses. More recently Solange Knowles, Janelle Monae, and Esperanza Spalding have all played with natural looks.

via Chemical-free black hair is not simply a trend – Lifestyle – The Boston Globe.

“Dark Girls”–A Look At Colorism and Internalized Racism In The Black Community(Full Documentary)

“Published on Oct 13, 2013
Dark Girls is a 2012 documentary film by American filmmakers Bill Duke and D. Channsin Berry. It documents colorism based on skin tone among African Americans, a subject still considered taboo by many black Americans. The film contains interviews with notable African Americans including Viola Davis. It also reports on a new version of the 1940s black doll experiment by Kenneth and Mamie Clark, which proved that black children had internalized racism by having children select a white or a black doll (they typically chose white) based on questions asked. In the updated version, black children favored light-skinned dolls over dark-skinned dolls. Dark Girls explores the many struggles, including self-esteem issues, which women of darker skin face allowing women of all ages recount “the damage done to their self-esteem and their constant feeling of being devalued and disregarded.”
Duke and Berry even take it a step farther and interview African American men who claim they could not date a woman of dark skin. One young man interviewed saying “They [dark girls] look funny beside me. The documentary takes a look into the trend of black women all over the world investing in the multibillion dollar business of skin bleaching creams. Duke and Berry also examine how black women are trying to look more Caucasian while white women are trying to look more ethnic. “White women are risking skin cancer and tanning booths twice a week, Botoxing their lips, getting butt lifts to look more ethnic and crinkling up their hair.” The film was shown to a sell-out crowd at the Pan African Film Festival in Los Angeles, April 2012. Interviewed on NPR, Duke recounted an reaction he received at another showing, which indicated that colorism is not easily discussed and was asked by someone, ‘Why are you airing our dirty laundry?’ His answer was, “Because it’s stinkin’ up the house!”
Dark Girl has been shown in many cities including Chicago, Toronto, Oakland, and Atlanta. Duke and Berry hope to “create a discussion, because in discussion there’s healing, and in silence there is suffering. Somehow if you can speak it and get it out, healing starts.” The reaction to this film had been phenomenal. Dark Girls takes a different angle by allowing real women to tell their stories of how painful the struggle of being “darker skinned” can be.”

Teaching Black Girls To Be Proud Of Their Beauty • Africanglobe.net

Stereotypical portrayals of Black women as overly sexualized or subservient, destitute women are pervasive on television, movie screens, and music videos, as well as most “general market” magazine covers, where primarily light-skinned Black women are featured. The schools are no safe havens from this assault on Blackness.

via Teaching Black Girls To Be Proud Of Their Beauty • Africanglobe.net.