African Psychology

Black Panthers Revisited – Video – NYTimes.com

Black Panthers Revisited

BY Stanley Nelson and Laurens Grant | Jan. 22, 2015 | 7:18

This short documentary explores what we can learn from the Black Panther party in confronting police violence 50 years later.

via Black Panthers Revisited – Video – NYTimes.com.

7 Ways to Avoid Being Brainwashed by White Supremacy | Atlanta Blackstar

Father and son

Educate Yourself

When exercising dominion over another group, the white power structure will exert control over three branches of society: the education system, law enforcement and religion. Control is extended over the institutions which shape the human mind, body and spirit. Of course you must submit to some method of formalized education, but while you’re doing so, understand that you are being fed the system’s propaganda, giving people control over your minds whose best interest is to keep you ignorant, docile and complacent. So you must step outside the system and create your own curriculum.

via 7 Ways to Avoid Being Brainwashed by White Supremacy|Atlanta Blackstar.

Lawmakers make ‘hands up’ gesture on House floor – Lucy McCalmont – POLITICO| #OYRchallenge

“Hands up, don’t shoot. It’s a rallying cry of people all across America who are fed up with police violence,” Rep. Hakeem Jeffries (D-N.Y.) said as he took the floor. “In community, after community, after community, fed up with police violence in Ferguson, in Brooklyn, in Cleveland, in Oakland, in cities and counties and rural communities all across America.”

via Lawmakers make ‘hands up’ gesture on House floor – Lucy McCalmont – POLITICO.

After Ferguson, my feminism will never be the same | #OYRchallenge

The raw silence spoken of by Tina Mbachu in this article rings back to my vision of small enclaves peppered with frightened aged African Americans in America. She points to white feminists’ singular focus on their backyard and their circus. Similarly, the last few years of heightened African Americans murdered and elder malaise leaves one to gasp with each news flash, each video of gunfire spurting from a sea of blue.

After Ferguson, my feminism will never be the same

“This coming Black History month plagues me the most, as I look back over my social media posts. We have become numb to those sepia and black and white photos of the sixties. They dramatize the void between then and now. They ceased to represent hope so long ago that our Black politicians forgot what they truly represented and are to represent. And so, this paraphernalia becomes an addition to our term papers, articles, festivals, and blogs. We market them to the forlorn instead of justice. We pull them out to wipe our brows after we have sold the community to feed our bellies.

“We are fighting the same issues, yet our children are forming new ideas — new means of protest,” one social media poster said. And I grunt. Another prided the police’s traffic control prowess during our local march. I am still stunned from the vision of a young man shot to death by police just a few years ago on our streets that ended in silence; and her politicizing the mother’s grief. I digress because the she is a woman, a mother, and Black; and the message she sent is “No mother. Your son’s death is not important here. Our borrowed crinoline skirts must remain intact.””

So Tina Mbachu’s indictment against white feminist can be broadened to include a hubris and selfish protest adopted by all of us for too long. The selfish protest our children are now rejecting. The protest that used them as blame, shields, and sacrifices to what we labeled Black Progress. I hear Mbachu clearly when she states:

After Ferguson, my feminism will never be the same
Traumatic transmission across generation is the leftover pain, the unbearable weight of it on our mothers, our fathers. This grief is transferred to us across multiple vectors. The transferring of trauma is also a transferring of tasks. Once solidarity is created in the process, the new generation must now find ways to deal with the pain. We must find new ways to represent our pains, to discuss them, and to heal.

As a feminist, whether a white liberal or radical feminist, you are absolutely wrong to question how I express this pain.

via After Ferguson, my feminism will never be the same.

Killer cops, drone wars and the crisis of democracy – Salon.com

2014 violence

Racism and its close cousin xenophobia are ingredients baked into the slave morality that afflicts so many white Americans, feeding a persecution complex and a sense of permanent aggrievement among the most historically privileged demographic group on the planet. (Yes, there are millions of poor whites, and they have good reason to lament their marginal, forgotten status. They also have a strong tendency to look for enemies in the wrong places.) Crime is at or near all-time lows, employment is high, many consumer goods are cheaper than ever before and the United States has not experienced a major attack by foreign terrorists in 13 years. Given all that, it is crucial to conceal the real source of middle-class and working-class America’s worsening anomie: the vast gulf of inequality between the super-rich and the rest of us, along with the stagnant wages, declining benefits and longer work weeks confronted by ordinary people.

As the black radical philosopher Frantz Fanon observed in the early 1960s, racism becomes a tool in the hands of the masters, used to pit different sectors of the oppressed against each other. He was talking about the European working class and its reluctance to join forces with the anti-colonial struggle in Africa, but we face a version of the same problem today. This week I watched an eerie and powerful new collage film from Swedish documentarian Göran Hugo Olsson called “Concerning Violence,” which is inspired by Fanon’s revolutionary classic “The Wretched of the Earth” (a book not as far away from Nietzsche as you might suppose). The film is an essayistic and aphoristic assemblage of archival footage from the ‘60s, ‘70s and ‘80s, opening a window onto various episodes from that little-understood and profoundly important period of post-colonial and anti-colonial history in Africa. But it also struck me as a distorted mirror reflecting our own situation, which has elements of internal colonialism (with respect to the poorest elements of our population), and an external neo-colonialism, although held at a great distance and largely invisible.

via Killer cops, drone wars and the crisis of democracy – Salon.com.

Harry Belafonte Gave A Stirring, Scorching Speech To Hollywood About Race | #OYRchallenge

Historical speech given by Harry Belafonte at the 2014 Governors Awards. Featured also, Sidney Poitier. 

Excerpt:

It was Robeson who said, as you heard in the film earlier, ‘Artists are the gatekeepers of truth. They are civilization’s radical voice.’ This Robeson environment sounded like a desired place to be. And given the opportunity to dwell there has never disappointed me.

For my like of activism and commitment to social change, the opposition has been fiercely punitive. Some who’ve controlled institutions of culture and commentary have at times used their power to not only distort truth, but to punish the truth-seekers. With interventions like McCarthyism and the blacklist, Hollywood, too, has sadly played its part in these tragic scenarios. And on occasion, I have been one of its targets.

via Harry Belafonte Gave A Stirring, Scorching Speech To Hollywood About Race.

GriotWorks: The Story of Power| #OYRchallenge

GriotWorks of Philadelphia, PA offers cultural competency courses for African American youth and adults. Below is their Griot Sway Youth Music video. These are truly talent young individuals. 
GriotWorks is a signature organization in producing and presenting artistic work based in African American traditions, storytelling and culture. Modeling our work after the role of the “Griot” or “Jeli”, storytellers in West Africa who hold communities together by sharing stories that relay history, educate, honor traditions, share morals and envision a collective future, we aim to serve communities and audiences by doing the same.

via GriotWorks.

5 Powerful Ways Black People Can Help Counter White Supremacy – Page 2 of 5 – Atlanta Blackstar | #OYRchallenge

Build and Support Black Institutions

Support Black organizations whose goal is to uplift and improve the Black community. Learn about the Black community and find out what can be, should be and needs to be done to improve it. Join Black organizations and be a part of supporting the Black community. The goal of these organizations should be to provide guidance and direction to the Black community that will create a multi-generational movement toward improving the Black community.

via 5 Powerful Ways Black People Can Help Counter White Supremacy – Page 2 of 5 – Atlanta Blackstar.

Why Democrats Got Trampled On Election Night | #OYRchallenge

A population can say more to those who are really listening, by inaction rather than their actions. Congress’s inaction during the Obama regime is a prime example. So why do we ignore this election’s cycle non-supporters? Is it because we would need to make necessary alterations to a tragic comedy played out by the gatekeepers of minority and low-income communities? Still, Democrats address the inaction as causation for crimes against their communities and loss of civil and citizen’s rights. Life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

Democrats Get Trampled On Election Night

Democrats thought they had it all in the bag so the only necessary rhetoric to minorities and poor was “Get out and vote.” This election cycle, Liberal racism showed its head and most minority community leaders simply ignored it in hopes of future opportunities to rise in power. After 150 years of waiting, the educated young and some older African Americans are speaking out by not speaking at all.

Hip Hop artist and activist, Talib Kweli explains his views on the premise of politics and the values that should be associated with voting. “We have an intrinsic value system that celebrates giving people nothing and extracting everything from them.”


The questions no Democrat thought we want answered are:

      “Vote for what?”
      “Where are our issues represented?”
      “Other than handouts, what anti-discrimination local and national bills do you support?”
      “What have you done with the Environmental justice bill initiated by Bill Clinton back in the 20th century?”

“On Feb 11, 1994, President Bill Clinton signed Executive Order 12898, “Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations“,” See: http://www.epa.gov/environmentaljustice/basics/ejbackground.html. And there it slowly became a secret to the masses. Environmental Justice covers healthy social and concrete spaces — openings for liberals to engage desperate and marginalized communities, yet the party talking points were handouts and how to survive poor, yet desperate.

Think Progress‘s October 1, 2014 article, “Federal Judge Guts The Nationwide Ban On Housing Discrimination” 

“In the housing sphere, a recent study on behalf of the Department of Housing and Urban Development found that black and Asian homeseekers are shown or told about 15 to 19 percent fewer homes than whites with similar credit qualifications and housing interests…According to a study conducted on behalf of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, African Americans and Asians who are looking for a new home are shown or informed of 15 to 19 percent fewer listings than white homebuyers with similar credit and housing interests. Similarly, African Americans with good credit were 3.5 times as likely as whites with similar credit to receive higher-interest-rate loans during the subprime lending boom. Latinos were 3.1 more likely than whites to receive the same loans. The Federal Reserve determined in 2009 that African Americans were twice as likely to be denied a loan as similarly situated whites. ” – Think Progress, http://thinkprogress.org/justice/2014/11/04/3588462/federal-judge-guts-nationwide-ban-on-housing-discrimination/

Marginalizing statistics greatly impacting the productivity of any group in this country and the lack of politicizing rhetoric towards this end speaks greatly to our priorities when choosing candidates. This particular article was released a month before election day. The information is readily available, especially to our concerned politicians.

Democrats depended on liberal and minority politicians, through incentives, to strong arm and shame its people into continuing a game with no winners and no attempt at addressing key issues. Oh, let us not forget fear of the GOP agendas.

The politically selected issues were women and seniors. Domestic violence against women took the threshold and we imagined millions of women battered and bruised across America, while African American families witnessed horrifying news of children shot and sprayed with tear gas. An entrée to this meal was the seasonal attack on Black athletes, despite the overwhelming examples and statistics of law enforcement employees’ domestic violence cases.

The article by Huffington Post’s Black Voices is an opening to relevant conversations beyond the “Black People don’t vote,” chosen Democratic talking points, and media manipulation of this past disgraceful election cycle. Their political rundown for 2016 strategies is refreshing.

Candidates across the country shunned the president, with one famously refusing even to say whether she voted for him; they ran from the party’s signature accomplishment, national health care reform; and they panicked when the White House considered doing broad-based immigration reform by executive action. Instead, a robust get out the vote operation was supposed to save the party, which rested its hopes in shifting demographic trends and fear of GOP extremists. But when you don’t give your voters much to “get out” for, what’s left?

“We gave Dems no reason to run,” said an adviser to President Barack Obama. “We ran as Dems-lite.”

Too light.

 

via Democrats Get Trampled On Election Night.