African American women

My Christmas Gift from Michelle Smith – my New Soul Sister. 

Just before the holidays, most teaching professionals gripe about grading papers on social media. Professor Smith’s experience is going viral and garnered at least two articles by online publications, besides the entry in her own blog entitled, “Maybe We Do Need White History Month or Millennials Don’t Know Shit About Slavery or Picking Appropriate Essay Topics or Being a Black English Adjunct Sucks Sometimes–Merry Christmas”.

Smith reviews an essay on the benefits of slavery turned in by one of her students with a thought provoking essay of her own. For a young adult to determine any social or political benefit from slavery to African Americans is disturbing. We have not done our jobs. Do we seem too complacent in our damage and recovery? Smith’s essay lays groundwork for new national conversations, if we would only listen.

This is definitely going to be a Merry, Merry Christmas.

Source: Maybe We Do Need White History Month or Millennials Don’t Know Shit About Slavery or Picking Appropriate Essay Topics or Being a Black English Adjunct Sucks Sometimes–Merry Christmas

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#BlackExcellence: Alice Walker Pens Beautiful Poem For Jesse Williams — HelloBeautiful

Source: Walter McBride / Getty Jesse Williams’ recent BET Awards speech on Black liberation and racism woke up America and garnered new fans–including famed writer and activist Alice Walker. The Color Purple author inspired by the Grey’s Anatomy star, she wrote a powerful poem and posted it on her website. Here It Is addresses the…

via #BlackExcellence: Alice Walker Pens Beautiful Poem For Jesse Williams — HelloBeautiful

Jesse Williams Wants You To ‘Stay Woke’ In New Film On Black Lives Matter | HuffPost, Black Voices

STAY WOKE: The Black Lives Matter Movement, a Jesse Williams production.

“Black Lives Matter is in many ways, in its adolescence,” Williams told The Huffington Post about his involvement in the film and his thoughts on various aspects about the movement. He discussed with HuffPost the birth of the #BlackLivesMatter hashtag, how it subsequently swept the Internet by storm and how the hashtag helped to bring about real change. He also highlighted the daunting feat the movement’s participants have in figuring out how to create lasting change. 

Catch the rest of the article here: STAY WOKE

Source: Jesse Williams Wants You To ‘Stay Woke’ In New Film On Black Lives Matter

Interview: Former Ohio State Senator Nina Turner challenges the Black Vote | Democracy in Color

An interview by Democracy in Color‘s Aimee with former Ohio State Senator Nina Turner, Leader of the Progressive Movement and Bernie Sanders Supporter:

Turner addresses the history of the Black Vote and why we are not seriously courted by Democrats in politics or policy, most especially in this coming General Election.

“I want to be proposed to, I want to get the ring. But because we are so predictable in our voting patterns, people who run for office — whether it is the Clintons or anybody else who is a Democrat — they don’t have to court us substantively, and we certainly don’t get the ring,” says Turner

“When A. Phillip Randolph, the labor leader of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, threatened President Roosevelt and said, “You are going to do something for the Black community or I’m going to march on you.” This was in the ’40s, before the March on Washington in the ’60s. The president didn’t want to see that, so he negotiated and we got something tangible for generations to come, for our vote. I don’t see us getting anything — the collective us — from Democrats that’s tangible for generations to come. That is the problem that I have.”

Turner challenges us to vote for our future, not our fear.

The interview in its entirety at: Democracy in Color

Source: Nina Turner: Leader of the American Progressive Movement — Democracy in Color

Who determines if Black Women are Beautiful? | Mommafucious

While catching up on Season 2 of the “Being Mary Jane” television series, I came upon a scene in Episode 9 where Gabrielle Union as Mary Jane Paul hosts a discussion on the Black woman’s image. Is she ugly?

The guest are real life activist and scholars, singer-songwriter, actress, musician, and record producer India Arie; Mark Anthony Neal a Professor of African & African American Studies and the founding director of the Center for Arts, Digital Culture and Entrepreneurship (CADCE) at Duke University; and Michaela Angela Davis, image activist, feminist, and CNN contributor. Professor Neal hosts many Black scholars on his weekly webcast, “Left of Black,” so this was right up his alley.

The question is: Black women. Do you feel Beautiful?WE have to say we are magic,” says Davis. Watch and Learn!!!

Be color brave, not color blind: Mellody Hobson at TED2014 | TED Blog

Hobson wants to make clear, “I’m not here to complain. I’ve been treated well by people of all races more often than not. I have succeeded in my life more than my wildest expectations. I tell the uniform story because it happened. I tell the race stats because they are real.” And furthermore, those continuing problems threaten to rob future generations of their opportunities.


Source: Be color brave, not color blind: Mellody Hobson at TED2014 | TED Blog

Self-Care for Black Women: A Photography Exhibit Focuses on What It Looks Like | The Root

More from The RootThe Beautiful Project

The Beautiful Project, a Durham, N.C.-based nonprofit, has launched an online exhibit—“The Self Care Exhibit: A Word and Image Act of Self-Preservation and Political Warfare”—to help us see, through a photographic collective, how that self-preservation Sister Audre was referencing takes shape. The organization has long empowered black girls by making them partners in reframing their images in the media, but this is the first time it is applying its unique artistic activism through photography to an issue specific to adult black women.

The concept emerged during a conversation in 2013 when Jamaica Gilmer, a professional photographer gifted in the art of storytelling with her lens, and fellow co-founders of the Beautiful Project, writer and educator Pamela Thompson and educator and activist Erin Stephens, led a discussion with their group of contributors.

via Self-Care for Black Women: A Photography Exhibit Focuses on What It Looks Like – The Root.

Watch the First Black Woman Who Served in the US Senate Go Off on the Confederate Flag | Mother Jones

Carol Moseley-Braun’s 2014 interview on her 1993 Senate struggle to establish a case to abolish the Confederate Flag. The titled article includes the original video of the then Senator Moseley-Braun’s actual speech on the floor of the Senate. Riveting.


On July 22, 1993, an impassioned Carol Moseley-Braun of Illinois—the first African-American woman to serve in the US Senate and its sole black member at the time—took the floor to rebuke conservative legislators including the late Jesse Helms, who were backing an amendment to secure the Confederate flag as the official design for the United Daughters of the Confederacy.

Moseley-Braun said: “The issue is whether Americans such as myself who believe in the promise of this country, who feel strongly and who are patriots in this country, will have to suffer the indignity of being reminded time and time again that at one time in this country’s history we were human chattel. We were property. We could be traded, bought, and sold.”

via Watch the First Black Woman Who Served in the US Senate Go Off on the Confederate Flag | Mother Jones.

http://www.c-span.org/video/?c4457005/senator-moseley-braun-remarks-confederate-insignia

Is Natural Hair Going the Way of Fake Boobs and Tattoos? | Habari Gani, America!

naturalhair

Photo from Clarksville Natural Hair Show http://www.eventbrite.com

I think.. (Notice I said, “I think.”) that the hair revolution of the 1960’s and 70’s also went the way of the revolution – down the drain. We had no follow through. It was mostly a fad in the populous with no real grounding in our African culture. Similar to naming our children African sounding (Notice – I said, “African sounding”) names during that era. The theories and dialogue were there, but some were not just visual, they are followers – drones. There are numerous examples out there and even more numerous closer to home.

The main ideal was to change our culture and the rest would follow. But the populace grows weary of the struggle and for the past 40 years at least most reverted back to a quasi-Africanism. Natural hair has become a fad for the wanna-bee conscious and a state of being for the conscious, similar to the dashiki. Whites wore dashiki’s too in the 1960’s, but it was a state of rebellion against “the man.” When Chris Rock‘s statement to Black women clamoring for natural Indian hair in his documentary, “Good Hair,” did he ever think that the craze would bring about the ample supply of synthetic African styled extensions? It is still a fad for most. They want to be in. But the first time that they are turned down for a job because of their locks, they fold, feel those insecurities deepen, and lose ground. It has to become an inner-force – a love affair with the African body. Right now, it is like fake boobs and tattoos. After 40 of my 57 years, – I am still waiting.

Chalk Names Of Police Murder Victims Stretch Nearly A Mile In Baltimore | The Anti-Media

Baltimore Street Art

Baltimore, MD –  Last week, an artist in Baltimore began writing names of fatal victims of the police force along the sidewalk. She began with victims killed on May 1st of 2013 and wrote every name that was recorded until the present day. Names stretched from Penn Station to a George Washington monument in the middle of the city, which is nearly a mile in distance.

Baltimore, MD

via Chalk Names Of Police Murder Victims Stretch Nearly A Mile In Baltimore.