African American professional

Michelle Alexander, author of “The New Jim Crow” – 2013 George E. Kent Lecture – YouTube

In 2013 the author of the New Jim Crow in the Age of Colorblindness, Michelle Alexander, foreshadowed the current protests, violence, and the racially-biased and hyperbolic media rhetoric surrounding it all. Listen to how even Alexander lived in denial as most professionals comfort themselves. The benefits of social media is that we are able to readily observe everyone’s complacency in the growing drama as we victimize the victim, support the manufactured policies that create a caste of the unseen, unwanted, and cast aside; or worst – remain silent.

Published on Mar 15, 2013

Michelle Alexander, highly acclaimed civil rights lawyer, advocate, Associate Professor of Law at Ohio State University, and author of The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, delivers the 30th Annual George E. Kent Lecture, in honor of the late George E. Kent, who was one of the earliest tenured African American professors at the University of Chicago.

The Annual George E. Kent Lecture is organized and sponsored by the Organization of Black Students, the Black Student Law Association, and the Students for a Free Society.

via Michelle Alexander, author of “The New Jim Crow” – 2013 George E. Kent Lecture – YouTube.

Advertisements

Why We Can’t Feel Black Men’s Pain – Melissa Haris-Perry – YouTube | #OYRchallenge

Melissa Harris-Perry points to examples in medicine, society, and police testimony when determining that African American pain and pain management is considered less than that of Whites during times of illness, physical treatment, and mental anxiety. 
Melissa Harris-Perry on why the recurring murders of young black men, America just can’t seem to put themselves in the shoes of black males. From Melissa Harris-Perry on MSNBC.

via Why We Can’t Feel Black Men’s Pain – Melissa Haris-Perry – YouTube.

‘Dear White Academics …’ | Vitae

“Wow, you’re so articulate.”
“Are you the cleaning lady?”
“Do you have a Ph.D.?”
“James? What’s your real Asian name?”

Dear White People

You’ve heard or heard of statements like these. Students and scholars call them “microaggressions”—casual, everyday comments and questions that might not rise to the level of a verbal altercation or a physical beatdown, but are rooted in stereotyping and racially-biased assumptions nevertheless.

Some microaggressions are obvious. But it can take a well-tuned ear to perceive the subtleties and nuances in others. The people delivering coded comments might actually intend them as compliments, not realizing that they are holding on to stereotypes that are invisible to them.

As a returning African American and retired Systems Engineer student, after 20 years absence from academia, these microaggressions, not only by whites but surprisingly from other African American professors, raised my blood pressure. The first two weeks with an unfamiliar professor was a tight rope walk between maintaining respect for their proficiency and battling their cultural and class ignorance.

I must add to the author’s short list of microaggressions with these.

The patronizing African American father,
“I know your struggle. We were so poor…”

First day of class,
“You might want to take an easier class.”

The Master’s research meeting,
“We may want to refer to … for more information on the local drug scene, street life, …”

Your eyes bulge, but hopefully not enough to be that one person every African American does not want to stereotype at these venues. The Angry Black Woman or Man. So you recline, count the hours until you can make a hasty retreat, count up how much you are spending for this abuse, open your books at night and push the demons away to let in empirical evidence that this is all not a waste of time. This article places the response to these microaggressions better than I ever could.

“The greatest microaggression, some say, is that they feel unable to express their displeasure. That’s because they don’t want to be perceived as “angry” people of color who constantly play “the race card.” A few others say they’ve learned not to get angry or paranoid: Microaggressions, they say, reflect the flaws of the people dishing them out. Better to invest their time and energy on working on things they can change.”

In business, there is the option of consulting attorneys in the worse cases. Academia does not afford students this option. Students are locked in by a financial and personal investment. These perpetrators know this and find no need to leash their ill-behaviors.

The article points to a book, a supplement to the film “Dear White People,” “Dear White People: A Guide to Inter-Racial Harmony in ‘Post-Racial’ America,” which hopefully all academic professionals and students will absorb. If they cannot find the time, there is also a chart or shortlist to guide them through their internal war with their past and present demons toward a more cultured future.

via ‘Dear White Academics …’ | Vitae.

Link to Dear White People: A Guide to Inter-Racial Harmony in ‘Post-Racial’ America  by Justin Simien, Ian O’Phelan on Amazon.com

Book_DearWhite People

Dear White People and the Myth of the Post-Race College Campus | NewBlackMan in Exile | #OYRchallenge

Dear White People and the Myth of the Post-Race College Campus | NewBlackMan in Exile

In this comprehensive review of Justin Simien’s first film “Dear White People,” published in “NewBlackMan (in Exile)”, Stephane Dunn teases out the academic and cultural notations guiding this redress on post-racialism. The film’s production and acceptance by the viewing public stands as a step forward in the overt race conversation. The title alone, in earlier years and still today, would have whites and fearful Blacks running the other way. Yet, “Dear White People” is making its rounds in theaters across the United States. Progress at least among some populations.

Excerpt:

Dear White People doesn’t merely copy or recycle still relevant cultural critiques about the racist imagery that infuses film and American culture though Simien certainly traverses some familiar ground – racialized representations in pop culture and warring notions of black authenticity, brought up to date with Aaron McGruder-like Boondock boldness. Dear White People adds its own chapter taking on ‘post-racial’ – ‘post-black’ contemporary discourses. However, that and title aside, its concern is with a range of competing social identities, particularly class and sexuality and the intersection of these with race. Race is as much a device as key theme.- Stephane Dunn

Similar to Ferguson, Missouri’s recent protest in the murder of Michael Brown, among other young Black men and women, some in the African American community sit astraddle the discussion of race. Our scholars and young are eager for the discussion to expand beyond academic discourse. The older and fearful or ‘conservative’ wait to mingle among the crowds that gather or recline – if a spark is not ignited. The mixed bag is historic and similar to any community. Still this historic step forward does not require the total capitulation of the African American community. The mere progress of this film speaks for itself.

Read this review. See the film. Then, bring this conversation of race and identity to your dinner table, clubs, and communities.


via Dear White People and the Myth of the Post-Race College Campus | NewBlackMan in Exile.

Talib Kweli, Dead Prez, Cornel West speak up for Ferguson at Hip Hop 4 Justice : Entertainment

Hip hop artist perform Sunday night for Ferguson October weekend protest.

Ferghiphopconcert

Excerpt:

Hip-hop artists national and local converged on small midtown concert club Fubar on Sunday afternoon in the name of Hip Hop 4 Justice.

The event alternatively titled Hip Hop & Resistance included appearances from Talib Kweli, Dead Prez, Tef Poe, Doorway, Bo Dean, Rockwell Knuckles, T-Dubb-O, Family Affair, Nato Caliph, Scripts & Screws, Nick Menn, Rebel Diaz, Aloha Mi’sho and more.

Activist-author Cornel West, in town to keynote a mass meeting at Chaifetz Arena on Sunday night as part of the weekend of protests dubbed FergusonOctober, made a surprise appearance at Fubar, as did actor Jesse Williams of “Grey’s Anatomy,” who has been vocal about unrest in Ferguson. FergusonOctober is an organized wave of resistance calling for justice and lasting change in the wake of the shooting death of Ferguson teenager Michael Brown by police officer Darren Wilson.

via Talib Kweli, Dead Prez, Cornel West speak up for Ferguson at Hip Hop 4 Justice : Entertainment.

Racial attitudes are put under the microscope in satirical ‘Dear White People’ | 107.5 WBLS – Your #1 Source for R&B

The film follows four black students at a fictional Ivy League campus, where racial tensions have reached a boiling point over the party.But for star Tyler James Williams, his biggest problem was his hair.

The actor/rapper, 22, says he wishes he had the script earlier so he would have had time to grow out his character’s Afro. He instead had to sport an uncomfortable weave that he yanked out of his hair one morning.“Then a big patch was missing, so a wig got involved,” Williams tells The News. “It was a low point in my life.”

via Racial attitudes are put under the microscope in satirical ‘Dear White People’ | 107.5 WBLS – Your #1 Source for R&B.

Cornel West, Others Arrested At Ferguson Protest – NBC News.com | #OYRchallenge


By Patrick Howell O’Neill on October 13, 2014

Activist and academic Dr. Cornel West was arrested during demonstrations in Ferguson, Mo. He was on the scene to protest police brutality against black males, including the August shooting death of Michael Brown and another incident on Saturday, another 18-year-old killed by police just miles from Ferguson.Here’s Fusion’s livestream of the protests:

via Dr. Cornel West arrested in Ferguson.

Cornel West Arrested In Ferguson: BREAKING NEWS – YOUTUBE | #OYRchallenge

Dr. Cornel West has always been the example that going to jail is sometimes a part of activism. Long time academic and activist, West was arrested during the New York City “Stop and Frisk” rally three years ago. He has brought many demanding issues to the forefront in other arrest, bucking the stigma of arrest, which usually is a quieting tool for many African Americans, especially the affluent. Princeton University might double his salary after this. He is definitely a talking point.

Over 1,000 people joined in the “Ferguson October” protest over the death of Michael Brown, shot by police officer Darrel Wilson back in August 2014. Watch the video below:

Published on Oct 13, 2014

Author and activist Cornel West was arrested while demonstrating in Ferguson, Missouri, on Monday.West was in Ferguson as part of the “Ferguson October” rally, which has been attended by over 1,000 protesters.Journalists in Ferguson tweeted photos of the incident Monday afternoon.

West had joined peaceful demonstrations at St. Louis University on Sunday night. Hours earlier, during a large mass protest service, West said that he came to get arrested.“It’s a beautiful thing to see people on fire for justice, but I didn’t come here to give a speech,” West said during a discussion on Sunday night. “I came here to go to jail.”

via Cornel West Arrested In Ferguson: BREAKING NEWS – YouTube.

14 Incredible Web Series Created By and Featuring Black Women | #OYRchallenge

ForHarriet.com‘s Michelle Denise Jackson posted this list of webisodes featuring Black women. What made this most special was the commentor’s additions to the already noteworthy list. Snuggle in. This is going to be a warm and exciting winter on the web. 

Here are a few nibbles to get you started.



Michelle Denise JacksonI am a writer, storyteller, and performer, as well as an aspiring screenwriter and producer. I have spent most of my adult life feeling various degrees of outrage, disappointment, and frustration by the limited roles and narratives available to Black women in the mainstream entertainment and media industry.

via 14 Incredible Web Series Created By and Featuring Black Women.

Deadly Force, In Black And White

Deadly Force, In Black And White

Young black males in recent years were at a far greater risk of being shot dead by police than their white counterparts – 21 times greater i, according to a ProPublica analysis of federally collected data on fatal police shootings.The 1,217 deadly police shootings from 2010 to 2012 captured in the federal data show that blacks, age 15 to 19, were killed at a rate of 31.i7 per million, while just 1.47 per million white males in that age range died at the hands of police.One way of appreciating that stark disparity, ProPublica’s analysis shows, is to calculate how many more whites over those three years would have had to have been killed for them to have been at equal risk. The number is jarring – 185, more than one per week.

via Deadly Force, In Black And White.