Poverty

The Unspoken Response to Black Lives Matter vs Black on Black Crime and Other Maladies Black | Habari Gani, America!

A worthy read is “Nobody: Casualties of America’s War on the Vulnerable, from Ferguson to Flint and Beyond” by Marc Lamont Hill, Morehouse University professor and new addition to the morning radio show the “Breakfast Club.”

In an interviewMarc Lamont Hill for AOL BUILD, Hill said it. Within the few minutes allowed, he said what many of the socially conscious are thinking when sidelined from the Black Lives Matter agenda with the discussion of Black on Black crime and Black disobedience.  Hill states that “People who even if they don’t get killed by state violence through the form of bullets, they’re still committed to … slow death row – the death of poverty…

I  read at least five newspapers per day. Electronic media allows not only the authors response to a situation, but included are the public responses as well. From the death of Trayvon Martin in February 2012 to the more recent deaths of Alton Sterling and Philandro Castile, journalist and public commentators spoke within the confines of police and victim, prejudice and privilege, law and order. The policy driven isolation and destruction of Black economy creating targets of Black men and women never came into focus during these discussions – until now.

Before we continue our discussions of policy and practice, read “Nobody: Casualties of America’s War on the Vulnerable, from Ferguson to Flint and Beyond.”

View a snippet of Marc Lamont Hills AOL interview here at NewBlackMan (in Exile):

Source: Marc Lamont Hill Talks New Book ‘Nobody: Casualties of America’s War on the Vulnerable…’ | NewBlackMan (in Exile)

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Your Brain on Poverty: Why Poor People Seem to Make Bad Decisions – The Atlantic

poverty

As Andrew Golis points out, this might suggest something even deeper than the idea that poverty’s stress interferes with our ability to make good decisions. The inescapability of poverty weighs so heavily on the author that s/he abandons long-term planning entirely, because the short term needs are so great and the long-term gains so implausible. The train is just not coming. What if the psychology of poverty, which can appear so irrational to those not in poverty, is actually “the most rational response to a world of chaos and unpredictable outcomes,” he wrote.

None of this is an argument against poorer families trying to save or plan for the long-term. It’s an argument for context. As Eldar Shafir, the author of the Science study, told The Atlantic CitiesEmily Badger: “All the data shows it isn’t about poor people, it’s about people who happen to be in poverty. All the data suggests it is not the person, it’s the context they’re inhabiting.”

via Your Brain on Poverty: Why Poor People Seem to Make Bad Decisions – The Atlantic.

Who Suffers Most From Rape and Sexual Assault in America? – NYTimes.com

There are obvious steps we as a society can take to better support all victims of sexual violence: We have to stop blaming and shaming survivors, and to start holding perpetrators accountable. But we also need to do much more to support women in disadvantaged communities. These are the same women who have the least flexibility at work, the least access to reliable transportation, the least help with child care, and the least resources with which to pursue legal representation or medical treatment on their own. We need to do a better job of bringing health, legal and psychological services to them.

via Who Suffers Most From Rape and Sexual Assault in America? – NYTimes.com.

This Rare Tupac Interview is an Awesome Assessment on Why It’s Hard For Some Black People to ‘Bootstrap’ Themselves Out of Poverty – Atlanta Blackstar | #OYRchallenge


Rapper Tupac perfectly explains why it’s so hard for Black people to ‘bootstrap’ themselves out of poverty.Video by americanafricaneducation radio.

via This Rare Tupac Interview is an Awesome Assessment on Why It’s Hard For Some Black People to ‘Bootstrap’ Themselves Out of Poverty – Atlanta Blackstar.

The Temptations “Ball of Confusion” – YouTube

via The Temptations “Ball of Confusion” – YouTube.

Key Figures In CIA-Crack Cocaine Scandal Begin To Come Forward | #OYRchallenge

Gary Webb, Pulitzer Prize winning journalist

Young African Americans during the beginning of the Drug Wars heard whispers of government involvement. It was hush, hush in the media, but on the city streets and in Blacksploitation films like, Cotton Comes to Harlem, this was a reality. In 1996, Pulitzer Prize winning journalist Gary Webb published his book, Dark Alliance, connecting the African American Crack Cocaine explosion to a well planned CIA operation. Major news network entities attacked Webb’s research sending him off into obscurity and later suicide in December 2004.

A new film opening this week, Kill The Messenger, is a tribute to Gary Webb and his outstanding research into the attack on the African American community. History tells us that we are never really ready for the immediate truth. We need time and space, especially in attacks on minority groups, to digest our sins, distance ourselves from blame, and face cold realities we can no longer ignore. RIP, Gary Webb and may the force be with you. #OYRchallenge

More than 18 years have passed since Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Gary Webb stunned the world with his “Dark Alliance” newspaper series investigating the connections between the CIA, a crack cocaine explosion in the predominantly African-American neighborhoods of South Los Angeles, and the Nicaraguan Contra fighters — scandalous implications that outraged LA’s black community, severely damaged the intelligence agency’s reputation and launched a number of federal investigations. 

via Key Figures In CIA-Crack Cocaine Scandal Begin To Come Forward.

The Society of Fugitives – James Forman Jr. – The Atlantic

James Forman Jr’s The Society of Fugitives is an excellent and comprehensive review of Alice Goffman’s “On the Run: Wanted Men in a Philadelphia Ghetto.”  Forman compares and contrast other social research and studies to the disparaging commentary of Goffman’s character observations in her study of inner city men. Her characterizations represent a minute portion of population, yet Goffman assumes her chosen samples as a monolith of inner city life on the Philadelphia streets.

The best of social researchers reach a crevice they understand is too large for them to cross. The wise turn away and find another science project, yet some, already invested in weeks of research preparations and a finite amount of time per semester plod on to the demise of their subjects. This may be one of those times. The Society of Fugitives - James Forman Jr. - The Atlantic

Goffman was a sociology major, but her coursework hadn’t prepared her for the phenomenon she was witnessing. The situation of men like Mike and his friends had not figured prominently in previous ethnographies of the inner city. Whereas Anderson and others had written about young men who were continually suspected by the police but who had some chance of walking free after a street stop, the men Goffman studied were actually wanted. If the police were to stop them and discover their fugitive status, they would be taken into custody. These men also risked arrest for noncriminal activity that violated their probation or parole—staying out past curfew, for instance, or visiting a part of town where they weren’t allowed to be. As a result, they lived their lives on the run.

via The Society of Fugitives – James Forman Jr. – The Atlantic.

Stop blaming black parents for underachieving kids – The Washington Post | #OYRchallenge

For decades, the fault in education disparities between low-income whites and  African Americans was thrown atop the African American parents and parenting skills. They are not equip to raise children to think critically, engage literature, and calculate, – some said. The some included government officials, teacher’s unions, and even Black officials. Maybe this article will set them straight. African American children

Mayors, teachers unions, and news commentators have boiled down the academic achievement gap between white and black students to one root cause: parents. Even black leaders and barbershop chatter target “lazy parents” for academic failure in their communities, dismissing the complex web of obstacles that assault urban students daily.

via Stop blaming black parents for underachieving kids – The Washington Post.

Black Autonomy Federation Radio – Gender and Black Autonomy | BLACK TALK RADIO NETWORK™

gender and black autonomy

Gender and Black Autonomy

Throughout their history in America, women and girls of African descent have been routinely subjected to racism, patriarchy, sexism and other forms of gender oppression, denied jobs and equal access to health services, among other problems. Join us for a discussion with members of the Black Autonomy Federation Women’s Commission about why black women must assert their right to independently organize around and address issues of specific concern to them.

via Black Autonomy Federation Radio – Gender and Black Autonomy | BLACK TALK RADIO NETWORK™.

Watch This Young Black Man Give A Near Perfect Response To A White Male Who’s Ignorant About The Systematic Oppression of Black People – Atlanta Blackstar | #OYRchallenge

A young Black man explains the concept of Dream Defenders and the complex discourse surrounding Black Men in America.

Watch This Young Black Man Give A Near Perfect Response To A White Male Who’s Ignorant About The Systematic Oppression of Black People – Atlanta Blackstar.