Voting Rights

Interview: Former Ohio State Senator Nina Turner challenges the Black Vote | Democracy in Color

An interview by Democracy in Color‘s Aimee with former Ohio State Senator Nina Turner, Leader of the Progressive Movement and Bernie Sanders Supporter:

Turner addresses the history of the Black Vote and why we are not seriously courted by Democrats in politics or policy, most especially in this coming General Election.

“I want to be proposed to, I want to get the ring. But because we are so predictable in our voting patterns, people who run for office — whether it is the Clintons or anybody else who is a Democrat — they don’t have to court us substantively, and we certainly don’t get the ring,” says Turner

“When A. Phillip Randolph, the labor leader of the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters, threatened President Roosevelt and said, “You are going to do something for the Black community or I’m going to march on you.” This was in the ’40s, before the March on Washington in the ’60s. The president didn’t want to see that, so he negotiated and we got something tangible for generations to come, for our vote. I don’t see us getting anything — the collective us — from Democrats that’s tangible for generations to come. That is the problem that I have.”

Turner challenges us to vote for our future, not our fear.

The interview in its entirety at: Democracy in Color

Source: Nina Turner: Leader of the American Progressive Movement — Democracy in Color

Why Democrats Got Trampled On Election Night | #OYRchallenge

A population can say more to those who are really listening, by inaction rather than their actions. Congress’s inaction during the Obama regime is a prime example. So why do we ignore this election’s cycle non-supporters? Is it because we would need to make necessary alterations to a tragic comedy played out by the gatekeepers of minority and low-income communities? Still, Democrats address the inaction as causation for crimes against their communities and loss of civil and citizen’s rights. Life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.

Democrats Get Trampled On Election Night

Democrats thought they had it all in the bag so the only necessary rhetoric to minorities and poor was “Get out and vote.” This election cycle, Liberal racism showed its head and most minority community leaders simply ignored it in hopes of future opportunities to rise in power. After 150 years of waiting, the educated young and some older African Americans are speaking out by not speaking at all.

Hip Hop artist and activist, Talib Kweli explains his views on the premise of politics and the values that should be associated with voting. “We have an intrinsic value system that celebrates giving people nothing and extracting everything from them.”


The questions no Democrat thought we want answered are:

      “Vote for what?”
      “Where are our issues represented?”
      “Other than handouts, what anti-discrimination local and national bills do you support?”
      “What have you done with the Environmental justice bill initiated by Bill Clinton back in the 20th century?”

“On Feb 11, 1994, President Bill Clinton signed Executive Order 12898, “Federal Actions to Address Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations“,” See: http://www.epa.gov/environmentaljustice/basics/ejbackground.html. And there it slowly became a secret to the masses. Environmental Justice covers healthy social and concrete spaces — openings for liberals to engage desperate and marginalized communities, yet the party talking points were handouts and how to survive poor, yet desperate.

Think Progress‘s October 1, 2014 article, “Federal Judge Guts The Nationwide Ban On Housing Discrimination” 

“In the housing sphere, a recent study on behalf of the Department of Housing and Urban Development found that black and Asian homeseekers are shown or told about 15 to 19 percent fewer homes than whites with similar credit qualifications and housing interests…According to a study conducted on behalf of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, African Americans and Asians who are looking for a new home are shown or informed of 15 to 19 percent fewer listings than white homebuyers with similar credit and housing interests. Similarly, African Americans with good credit were 3.5 times as likely as whites with similar credit to receive higher-interest-rate loans during the subprime lending boom. Latinos were 3.1 more likely than whites to receive the same loans. The Federal Reserve determined in 2009 that African Americans were twice as likely to be denied a loan as similarly situated whites. ” – Think Progress, http://thinkprogress.org/justice/2014/11/04/3588462/federal-judge-guts-nationwide-ban-on-housing-discrimination/

Marginalizing statistics greatly impacting the productivity of any group in this country and the lack of politicizing rhetoric towards this end speaks greatly to our priorities when choosing candidates. This particular article was released a month before election day. The information is readily available, especially to our concerned politicians.

Democrats depended on liberal and minority politicians, through incentives, to strong arm and shame its people into continuing a game with no winners and no attempt at addressing key issues. Oh, let us not forget fear of the GOP agendas.

The politically selected issues were women and seniors. Domestic violence against women took the threshold and we imagined millions of women battered and bruised across America, while African American families witnessed horrifying news of children shot and sprayed with tear gas. An entrée to this meal was the seasonal attack on Black athletes, despite the overwhelming examples and statistics of law enforcement employees’ domestic violence cases.

The article by Huffington Post’s Black Voices is an opening to relevant conversations beyond the “Black People don’t vote,” chosen Democratic talking points, and media manipulation of this past disgraceful election cycle. Their political rundown for 2016 strategies is refreshing.

Candidates across the country shunned the president, with one famously refusing even to say whether she voted for him; they ran from the party’s signature accomplishment, national health care reform; and they panicked when the White House considered doing broad-based immigration reform by executive action. Instead, a robust get out the vote operation was supposed to save the party, which rested its hopes in shifting demographic trends and fear of GOP extremists. But when you don’t give your voters much to “get out” for, what’s left?

“We gave Dems no reason to run,” said an adviser to President Barack Obama. “We ran as Dems-lite.”

Too light.

 

via Democrats Get Trampled On Election Night.

Justice Ginsburg sees what motivates Texas’ voter ID law: racism – LA Times

Ginsburg’s colleagues voted 6-3 to allow the Texas law to remain in effect for the upcoming election. But as she observed in a scathing dissent issued Saturday, the measure may prevent more than 600,000 registered voters, or 4.5% of the total, from voting in person for lack of accepted identification. “A sharply disproportionate percentage of those voters are African-American or Hispanic,” she wrote

via Justice Ginsburg sees what motivates Texas’ voter ID law: racism – LA Times.

Justice Ginsburg sees what motivates Texas' voter ID law: racism - LA Times

Tragedy and Art: The Power of Sam Cooke’s ‘A Change Is Gonna Come’ | Robert F. Darden | #OYRchallenge

This article gives background information on Sam Cooke’s motivation in creating, A Change Is Gonna Come. In the midst of the Civil Rights struggle and desegregation, our artist continued the tradition of slave hymns and field songs, ushering in hope through the darkest of times. #OYRchallenge.

On the surface, “A Change is Gonna Come” doesn’t sound particularly challenging, especially in light of the defiant freedom songs that rocked the movement in 1964, “Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me ‘Round” or “I Got My Mind Stayed on Freedom.” The song was finally released as a single in late December of that year, shortly after Cooke’s untimely death. It quickly became one of the anthems of the movement and music historian Dave Marsh said that “A Change is Gonna Come” “ranks with Martin Luther King’s best speeches as a verbal encapsulation of the changes black perspective underwent in the Sixties.”

Despite surface appearances, African-American teenagers and movement activists knew exactly what it meant. The lyrics speak of a universally understood sense of alienation in their own land, of being treated as second-class citizens, of asking for help — and not receiving it, even from their own people. And like the great protest spirituals, even when recounting the grossest injustices, the singer continually returns to the hope, the expectation of justice: “Oh, there been times that I thought I couldn’t last for long/But now I think I’m able to carry on/It’s been a long, a long time coming/But I know a change is gonna come, oh yes it will.”

via Tragedy and Art: The Power of Sam Cooke’s ‘A Change Is Gonna Come’ | Robert F. Darden.

92-Year-Old Who Once Faced Literacy Tests Sues North Carolina Over New Wave Of Voter Suppression | ThinkProgress

When Rosanell Eaton was 21 years old and living in segregated North Carolina, she became one of the first African Americans in her county registered to vote, after successfully completing a literacy test that required her to recite the preamble to the Constitution. But now, at 92 years old, she faces new obstacles under the voter suppression law signed by Gov. Pat McCrory (R) Monday. For one thing, she may not qualify for the voter ID card required under the new law, because the name on her birth certificate is different from the name on her driver’s license and voter registration card. Reconciling this difference will be a costly and time-consuming administrative endeavor. For another, she has participated in early voting since it was instituted in the state. Now, it’s been cut back a week.

via 92-Year-Old Who Once Faced Literacy Tests Sues North Carolina Over New Wave Of Voter Suppression | ThinkProgress.