Slavery

My Christmas Gift from Michelle Smith – my New Soul Sister. 

Just before the holidays, most teaching professionals gripe about grading papers on social media. Professor Smith’s experience is going viral and garnered at least two articles by online publications, besides the entry in her own blog entitled, “Maybe We Do Need White History Month or Millennials Don’t Know Shit About Slavery or Picking Appropriate Essay Topics or Being a Black English Adjunct Sucks Sometimes–Merry Christmas”.

Smith reviews an essay on the benefits of slavery turned in by one of her students with a thought provoking essay of her own. For a young adult to determine any social or political benefit from slavery to African Americans is disturbing. We have not done our jobs. Do we seem too complacent in our damage and recovery? Smith’s essay lays groundwork for new national conversations, if we would only listen.

This is definitely going to be a Merry, Merry Christmas.

Source: Maybe We Do Need White History Month or Millennials Don’t Know Shit About Slavery or Picking Appropriate Essay Topics or Being a Black English Adjunct Sucks Sometimes–Merry Christmas

Advertisements

Slavery Reparations Could Cost Up to $14 Trillion, According to New Calculation|Newsweek

Slavery Reparations Could Cost Up to $14 Trillion, According to New Calculation

The Permanent Memorial to Honor the Victims of Slavery and the Transatlantic Slave Trade, in New York City, acknowledges a tragic chapter in the nation’s history. Some have argued that reparations for slavery would help heal long-festering racial strife. EDUARDO MUNOZ / REUTERS

Robert Westley, a professor at Tulane University who wasn’t involved in the paper, says that this and other examples can be used to refute arguments that slavery reparations would necessarily be too difficult to figure out. The French spoliation claims and others “were made and demanded over many generations,” he says. “Somehow problems of proof were not insurmountable in those cases, and shouldn’t be in the case of the United States with slavery.”

via Slavery Reparations Could Cost Up to $14 Trillion, According to New Calculation.

Black Then | The Price Slave Women Paid For The “Birth” Of Modern Gynecology

Dr. James Marion Sims was heralded as the father of gynecology, yet at whose expense?

Since the mid- twentieth century, academia has debated whether Sims was an ingenuous doctor who furthered the progression of medical science for women or a 19th monster who conducted painful unethical experiments on women who couldn’t say “No.”

In 1993 Durrenda Ojanuga, Ph.D. wrote that the problem with Sims’ experiments were that he used the institution of slavery to harbor human guinea pigs to perfect his procedures. Violating all concepts of human rights and medical ethics, the women were property subject to Sims’ trial and error experiments.

via Black Then | The Price Slave Women Paid For The “Birth” Of Modern Gynecology.

Post traumatic Disorder Dr Joy de Gruy Leary – YouTube

“We are all getting naked in this room!” ~ Dr. Joy DeGruy

Post traumatic Disorder Dr Joy de Gruy Leary – YouTube.

From – Dr. Joy DeGruy: BE THE HEALING

THE DR. JOY EXPERIENCE

http://joydegruy.com

Through lectures, workshops, seminars and special guest appearances, Dr. Joy has shined a light on the critical issues affecting society. Those who have experienced Dr. Joy in person, can tell you that they have been “stimulated, enlightened and inspired.” Dr. Joy’s seminars have been lauded as the most dynamic and inspirational currently being presented on the topics of culture, race relations and contemporary social issues. Topics include:

Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome – Effects of Slavery and Institutionalized Racism

Diversity Training

Healing Workshops

Culture Specific Models

Community Building

Violence and Gang Prevention

10 Slave Codes That Were Designed To Oppress And Humiliate Black People – Atlanta Blackstar

Enslaved Blacks and Africans did not readily accept slavery. There were many uprisings where white settlers were slain or injured, in the South and North. Plantation owners were fearful for their lives from a violent rebellion, so much so that they came together to create what they called “slave codes,” a succession of laws (some differed by colony) that restricted enslaved people’s behavior to control their actions and reduce the chances of an uprising.

 

Rejecting Slavery, a Crime Punishable by Death

Since the slave codes were inspired by the fear of Blacks, it’s not surprising that the most cruel and inhumane punishments were reserved for those who most rejected slavery. Attempting “to raise an insurrection” meant certain torture and death, but capital punishment was used for even lesser acts of resistance, such as destroying “any stack of rice, corn or other grain” or setting fire to “any tar kiln, barrels of pitch, tar, turpentine or rosin,” according to encyclopedia.com. Free Blacks who harbored escapees would be beaten by the slave owner and fined.

 

No Right to Bear Arms or Self-Defense

Blacks were prohibited from possessing weapons or lifting a hand against any white person, even in self-defense. If caught carrying a gun, the enslaved would receive 39 lashes with a whip and forfeit his weapon. In some places, even free Blacks couldn’t carry a gun. Eerily similar to how the police violence is protected by the laws of today, resisting the violence of a slaveholder or overseer granted them the right to kill that enslaved Black person without fear of prosecution.

via 10 Slave Codes That Were Designed To Oppress And Humiliate Black People – Atlanta Blackstar.

Four myths about slavery in the US | Daina Ramey Berry, University of Texas

People think they know everything about slavery in the United States, but they don’t. They think the majority of African slaves came to the American colonies, but they didn’t. They talk about 400 hundred years of slavery, but it wasn’t. They claim all Southerners owned slaves, but they didn’t. Some argue it was a long time ago, but it wasn’t.

Slavery has been in the news a lot lately. Perhaps it’s because of the increase in human trafficking on American soil or the headlines about income inequality, the mass incarceration of African Americans or discussions about reparations to the descendants of slaves. Several publications have fueled these conversations: Ta-Nehisi CoatesThe Case for Reparations in The Atlantic Monthly, French economist Thomas Picketty’s Capital in the Twenty First Century, historian Edward Baptist’s The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and The Making of American Capitalism, and law professor Bryan A. Stevenson’s Just Mercy: A Story of Justice and Redemption.

As a scholar of slavery at the University of Texas at Austin, I welcome the public debates and connections the American people are making with history. However, there are still many misconceptions about slavery.

via Four myths about slavery in the US.

Why We Can’t Feel Black Men’s Pain – Melissa Haris-Perry – YouTube | #OYRchallenge

Melissa Harris-Perry points to examples in medicine, society, and police testimony when determining that African American pain and pain management is considered less than that of Whites during times of illness, physical treatment, and mental anxiety. 
Melissa Harris-Perry on why the recurring murders of young black men, America just can’t seem to put themselves in the shoes of black males. From Melissa Harris-Perry on MSNBC.

via Why We Can’t Feel Black Men’s Pain – Melissa Haris-Perry – YouTube.

15 Black Uprisings Against European and Arab Oppression They Won’t Teach in Schools – Atlanta Blackstar | #OYRchallenge

The 15 least taught Uprisings of African enslaved peoples are  presented in the  article. The First Maroon War was my favorite pick but I am sure you will find other goodies of your own.

The First Maroon War

The First Maroon War

In 1739, the Jamaican Maroons were the first enslaved Africans to win their freedom from European slave masters. During the First Maroon War, they fought and escaped slavery and established free communities in the mountainous interior of the island. For 76 years, there were periodic skirmishes between the British and the Maroons, alongside occasional slave revolts.Eventually, the British government and slave holders realized they couldn’t defeat the Maroons, so they came up with a peace treaty that allowed them to live in their own free states in Jamaica. As a result, the Maroons established their five main towns: Accompong, Trelawny Town, Moore Town, Scots Hall, and Nanny Town.

Source: wikipedia.org

via 15 Black Uprisings Against European and Arab Oppression They Won’t Teach in Schools – Page 3 of 8 – Atlanta Blackstar.

Mike Brown’s shooting and Jim Crow lynchings have too much in common. It’s time for America to own up | Isabel Wilkerson | Comment is free | theguardian.com | #OYRchallenge

Ferguson Lynching

At left: Ferguson, Missouri, 2014, where a body was left in the street for four hours in the August sun. At right: Paris, Texas, 1893. Photographs: JB Forbes / St Louis Post-Dispatch via AP; Wikimedia Commons

the guardian photo

Not terribly long ago in a country that many people misremember, if they knew it at all, a black person was killed in public every four days for often the most mundane of infractions, or rather accusation of infractions – for taking a hog, making boastful remarks, for stealing 75 cents. For the most banal of missteps, the penalty could be an hours-long spectacle of torture and lynching. No trial, no jury, no judge, no appeal. Now, well into a new century, as a family in Ferguson, Missouri, buries yet another American teenager killed at the hands of authorities, the rate of police killings of black Americans is nearly the same as the rate of lynchings in the early decades of the 20th century.

 

via Mike Brown’s shooting and Jim Crow lynchings have too much in common. It’s time for America to own up | Isabel Wilkerson | Comment is free | theguardian.com.

Lincoln’s Back to Africa Solution by HL Gates, Jr. – The Root | #OYRchallenge

The Amazing love African Americans held for former President Abraham Lincoln has often been proven to be misplaced. Little does anyone realize that his first knee-jerk, and heartfelt reaction to African freedom was, “You can always leave.”

This article by Henry Louis Gates, Jr revisits the events of surrounding Lincoln’s meeting with African American delegates.

Amazing Fact About the Negro No. 92: When President Abraham Lincoln met with free black leaders in 1862, what did he propose?Today marks the anniversary of President Abraham Lincoln’s “shot heard ’round the world.” I’m referring, of course, to the Preliminary Emancipation Proclamation he fired off from the White House on Sept. 22, 1862, five days after the real bullets had been fired 70 miles outside of Washington, D.C., at the Battle of Antietam then and now the bloodiest day in American history, with close to 23,000 casualties. 

What little Union victory there was in Gen. Robert E. Lee’s withdrawal from Maryland gave Lincoln the opening he needed to issue the Confederacy his ultimatum: If it remained in a state of rebellion come Jan. 1, 1863, he would sign an executive order rendering “all” of its “slaves … then, thenceforward, and forever free.”

Read more at:  Lincoln’s Back to Africa Solution – The Root.