Mike Brown

Why We Can’t Feel Black Men’s Pain – Melissa Haris-Perry – YouTube | #OYRchallenge

Melissa Harris-Perry points to examples in medicine, society, and police testimony when determining that African American pain and pain management is considered less than that of Whites during times of illness, physical treatment, and mental anxiety. 
Melissa Harris-Perry on why the recurring murders of young black men, America just can’t seem to put themselves in the shoes of black males. From Melissa Harris-Perry on MSNBC.

via Why We Can’t Feel Black Men’s Pain – Melissa Haris-Perry – YouTube.

The Eric Garner Verdict: Analyses, Implications and What Comes Next – YouTube | #OYRchallenge

There has been a stiffening silence in African American homes of late. There is no language to bridge anguish, fear, and cognitive dissonance into language appropriate to educate, parent, and resolve going out the next day into the mirage of Americanism.  We avert our gaze when mistakenly another broadcast of protesters flicker across our television sets. Teacher’s College hopes to teach us to exhale through this silence. The panel assembled expressed the need to provide breathing space for race dialogue. Watch the video. #ICantBreathe #BlackLivesMatter

Streamed live on Dec 11, 2014

Panel Discussion and Teachers College Community dialogue to take seriously the question of what comes next here at Teachers College in the wake of the Eric Garner and Michael Brown non-indictments. Featuring Professors Chris Emdin, Yolanda Sealey-Ruiz, and doctoral student and poet Jamila Lyiscott.

via The Eric Garner Verdict: Analyses, Implications and What Comes Next – YouTube.

This Map Shows How Outrage Over The Eric Garner And Mike Brown Decisions Went Global

This Map Shows How Outrage Over The Eric Garner And Mike Brown Decisions Went Global

People all over the world are outraged about the failure to indict the police officers who killed Eric Garner and Michael Brown.

The proof is an animated map released by Twitter last week that shows the prevalence of tweets around the world using the hashtags #ICantBreathe, #BlackLivesMatter and #HandsUpDontShoot — three prominent rallying cries of a growing movement to hold police accountable for violence against black Americans. Twitter limited the time period of the map below from Nov. 24 (the day of the Michael Brown decision) to Dec. 4 (the day after the Eric Garner decision). And as you can see, the tweets light up much of the globe.

via This Map Shows How Outrage Over The Eric Garner And Mike Brown Decisions Went Global.

The ACLU & Elon James White: What To Do When You’re Stopped By Police – YouTube | #OYRchallenge

Uploaded on Jan 13, 2011

Comedian Elon James White speaking on behalf of the ACLU explains your rights in the event that you get stopped by police. #documenteverything

via The ACLU & Elon James White: What To Do When You’re Stopped By Police – YouTube.

Rams Players Enter Field With “Hands Up, Don’t Shoot” | #OYRchallenge

The NFL Rams Football players are not average citizens. They are highly visible entities in an established highly paid occupation. They risk much to take this public stand and should be commended for their bravery. They are now under attack as they suspected before making this decision. Why are they even more special? Because those with less to lose, less to benefit from silence chose silence.

St. Louis Rams players recognized this week’s Ferguson protests with an emphatic gesture during player introductions when several members of the team’s receiving corps entered the field in the “hands up, don’t shoot” pose.

Stedman Bailey, Tavon Austin, Jared Cook, Chris Givens, and Kenny Britt came out with their hands up, before being joined by the rest of the team to start the game.

via Rams Players Enter Field With “Hands Up, Don’t Shoot”.

Lawmakers make ‘hands up’ gesture on House floor – Lucy McCalmont – POLITICO| #OYRchallenge

“Hands up, don’t shoot. It’s a rallying cry of people all across America who are fed up with police violence,” Rep. Hakeem Jeffries (D-N.Y.) said as he took the floor. “In community, after community, after community, fed up with police violence in Ferguson, in Brooklyn, in Cleveland, in Oakland, in cities and counties and rural communities all across America.”

via Lawmakers make ‘hands up’ gesture on House floor – Lucy McCalmont – POLITICO.

After Ferguson, my feminism will never be the same | #OYRchallenge

The raw silence spoken of by Tina Mbachu in this article rings back to my vision of small enclaves peppered with frightened aged African Americans in America. She points to white feminists’ singular focus on their backyard and their circus. Similarly, the last few years of heightened African Americans murdered and elder malaise leaves one to gasp with each news flash, each video of gunfire spurting from a sea of blue.

After Ferguson, my feminism will never be the same

“This coming Black History month plagues me the most, as I look back over my social media posts. We have become numb to those sepia and black and white photos of the sixties. They dramatize the void between then and now. They ceased to represent hope so long ago that our Black politicians forgot what they truly represented and are to represent. And so, this paraphernalia becomes an addition to our term papers, articles, festivals, and blogs. We market them to the forlorn instead of justice. We pull them out to wipe our brows after we have sold the community to feed our bellies.

“We are fighting the same issues, yet our children are forming new ideas — new means of protest,” one social media poster said. And I grunt. Another prided the police’s traffic control prowess during our local march. I am still stunned from the vision of a young man shot to death by police just a few years ago on our streets that ended in silence; and her politicizing the mother’s grief. I digress because the she is a woman, a mother, and Black; and the message she sent is “No mother. Your son’s death is not important here. Our borrowed crinoline skirts must remain intact.””

So Tina Mbachu’s indictment against white feminist can be broadened to include a hubris and selfish protest adopted by all of us for too long. The selfish protest our children are now rejecting. The protest that used them as blame, shields, and sacrifices to what we labeled Black Progress. I hear Mbachu clearly when she states:

After Ferguson, my feminism will never be the same
Traumatic transmission across generation is the leftover pain, the unbearable weight of it on our mothers, our fathers. This grief is transferred to us across multiple vectors. The transferring of trauma is also a transferring of tasks. Once solidarity is created in the process, the new generation must now find ways to deal with the pain. We must find new ways to represent our pains, to discuss them, and to heal.

As a feminist, whether a white liberal or radical feminist, you are absolutely wrong to question how I express this pain.

via After Ferguson, my feminism will never be the same.

Killer cops, drone wars and the crisis of democracy – Salon.com

2014 violence

Racism and its close cousin xenophobia are ingredients baked into the slave morality that afflicts so many white Americans, feeding a persecution complex and a sense of permanent aggrievement among the most historically privileged demographic group on the planet. (Yes, there are millions of poor whites, and they have good reason to lament their marginal, forgotten status. They also have a strong tendency to look for enemies in the wrong places.) Crime is at or near all-time lows, employment is high, many consumer goods are cheaper than ever before and the United States has not experienced a major attack by foreign terrorists in 13 years. Given all that, it is crucial to conceal the real source of middle-class and working-class America’s worsening anomie: the vast gulf of inequality between the super-rich and the rest of us, along with the stagnant wages, declining benefits and longer work weeks confronted by ordinary people.

As the black radical philosopher Frantz Fanon observed in the early 1960s, racism becomes a tool in the hands of the masters, used to pit different sectors of the oppressed against each other. He was talking about the European working class and its reluctance to join forces with the anti-colonial struggle in Africa, but we face a version of the same problem today. This week I watched an eerie and powerful new collage film from Swedish documentarian Göran Hugo Olsson called “Concerning Violence,” which is inspired by Fanon’s revolutionary classic “The Wretched of the Earth” (a book not as far away from Nietzsche as you might suppose). The film is an essayistic and aphoristic assemblage of archival footage from the ‘60s, ‘70s and ‘80s, opening a window onto various episodes from that little-understood and profoundly important period of post-colonial and anti-colonial history in Africa. But it also struck me as a distorted mirror reflecting our own situation, which has elements of internal colonialism (with respect to the poorest elements of our population), and an external neo-colonialism, although held at a great distance and largely invisible.

via Killer cops, drone wars and the crisis of democracy – Salon.com.

The Illipsis: on Ferguson, riots and human limits – YouTube | #OYRchallenge

Published on Nov 26, 2014

In this second installment of The Illipsis, Jay Smooth looks back at the week’s events in Ferguson and asks how we can truly apply Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr’s advice that “riots are the language of the unheard.”

via The Illipsis: on Ferguson, riots and human limits – YouTube.

Darren Wilson’s Testimony Reads Like Ramblings of a Paranoid White Supremacist | Alternet

Ferguson, Mo

Social scientists and others have produced volumes of research which have repeatedly demonstrated how the American legal system reinforces, perpetuates, and reflects disparate racial outcomes and white supremacy. For example, their findings include how black Americans face racial bias and unfair treatment at every level of the criminal justice system from initial police encounters to sentencing and parole decisions.  Juries are influenced by implicit racial bias. Juries are also less likely to find black witnesses “credible” or “believable”. And perhaps most troubling,  white jurors can be subconsciously primed by images of apes and gorillas–this deeply racist association between animals and African-Americans in turn makes white jurors more likely to give black defendants the death penalty.

via Darren Wilson’s Testimony Reads Like Ramblings of a Paranoid White Supremacist | Alternet.