Fashion

The Most Stylish Women In Africa-Who made The List | FashionGHANA.com: 100% African Fashion

Genevieve Nnaji (NIGERIA)

These Fashionistas rule in more ways than one.

Mirror Mirror on the wall, these ladies are polished without being fussy, sexy,classy and make statement in a way that people can’t. They are our most stylish women ruling Africa, with easy asses to designer clothing, they ensemble in a way to turn heads and steal attention on social media and in real life.

Number 1 is Genevieve Nnaji
See: The Most Stylish Women In Africa-Who made The List | FashionGHANA.com: 100% African Fashion.

White Supremacy and Global Black Beauty Standards – YouTube


Published on Sep 29, 2014

This is How White Supremacy Works. A primary goal of white supremacy is to tear black people apart.

via White Supremacy and Global Black Beauty Standards – YouTube.

9 Qualities of Confident Women | Kali Rogers | #OYRchallenge

Kali Rogers

Kali Rogers lists the 9 attributes of Confident Women. My favorite is #2, and hard won. Learning to say ‘no’ in a charity driven community.

2. They say no.Now, some people may think this practice is betchy the PC version of b*tchy, but in reality, it’s pretty respectful. Confident women don’t overcommit and they don’t make false promises. They just say no. Why? Because they’d rather state the truth and decline rather than tell a white lie and then flake out later. And, they don’t have time for everything. No one does. The difference is, burnout simply isn’t on a confident woman’s agenda, so she makes sure to commit to things she’ll actually enjoy instead of piling every little thing onto her calendar for the sake of other people. Truth bomb.FYI: Confident women do RSVP, because, well, not doing so would actually be betchy.

via 9 Qualities of Confident Women | Kali Rogers.

Official Trailer for ‘Dear White People’ Movie – Urban Cusp

The film, written and directed by Justin Simien, is a satirical film about being a black face in a white place.  According to the official Facebook page for the film, “Dear White People follows the stories of four black students at an Ivy League college where a riot breaks out over a popular “African American” themed party thrown by white students. With tongue planted firmly in cheek, the film will explore racial identity in ‘post-racial’ America, while weaving a universal story of forging one’s unique path in the world.” #OYRchallenge

via Official Trailer for ‘Dear White People’ Movie – Urban Cusp.#OYRchallenge

Encouraging Young Girls To Be Happy With Their Hair | MadameNoire #OYRchallenge

Visiting a sister claiming the Natural Hair generation came as a great surprise when on a trip to her bathroom proved her most false. The shelves, lined with cosmetics, included several boxes of chemical and quasi-natural texturizers. Even more surprising was her consistent head swivels, while noting how tight her younger daughter’s curls are compared to the looser-curled older sister.

Conversations such as these throw me head first into the bowl, but considering some of the most disturbing behavior to seeing African hair at its natural has come from African American women in social media – I simply shook my head. Gabby Douglas and Beyonce’s baby daughter took almost more hits in social media than mass incarceration and a failing public education system among young African American women. This begs the question, is natural hair a new fad that will scurry into the fabric of America after the revolution, as dashiki’s of the 1960’s and 70’s, or are African American women having a tough time weaning off of the creamy-crackAfrican American girls

Girls and women should know and be able to easily recall the texture of their natural hair. It’s disheartening to hear a woman say she doesn’t know her true hair texture because she has kept up with a choice that was made by someone else to alter her hair many years ago as a child. It’s just another way of quietly stripping away the person she is by permanently changing her look and by taking away her choice. There is no reason a girl at six or seven years old needs a ‘treatment’ for her hair with all the information out there now about how to care for natural hair of a wide variety of textures.

via Encouraging Young Girls To Be Happy With Their Hair | MadameNoire.

MACKLEMORE & RYAN LEWIS – CAN’T HOLD US FEAT. RAY DALTON (OFFICIAL MUSIC VIDEO) #OYRchallenge

The “Own Your Racist” Challenge #OYRchallenge

What is the OYR challenge?

African Americans have been at war – mentally, physically, economically, and socially ever since the first African was dragged from a slave ship onto the American shores. The volumes of histories (European and African American), movies, television series, news reports, studies, and other publications serve as qualitative evidence to support this claim. It has always been the strategy of Racist and their racist collaborators (African American pseudo-intellectuals) to present the resulting body count as isolated or individual incidents to be argued within the confines of the criminal justice system, race discussion forums, and/or the same models used to maintain White Supremacy. Truth-be-told, these systems have eroded and the people lax into comfort that the myth of Black powerlessness is firmly in place. They have secured the veil with a 21st century Bi-racial President of their choosing, replacing the Civil Rights icons. Every playbook must be revised. Our young are inundated with slave songs, yet no one drills them with the principals that created Black Wall Street and other past ultra-wealthy and sound communities. There are only so many times African American children can attend the funeral of a murdered/lynched family member, friend or neighbor, buried with Amazing Grace and “I Have A Dream,” before they stop listening.

21st century African American youths acknowledge that they are human and know that humans are fallible. In a 1992 televised panel discussion, The Issue is Race, Sister Souljah points to the need for Black empowerment and business. She also points out that every municipality has their game in place to crush African American businesses much more easily now than with the attack on Black Wall St. Crime in the African American community, the most readily used silencing cue in the racist toolbox, reflects that humanity and the substantive pressures placed on that humanity. Our young in 2014 Ferguson, MI reformed the messages of African American history that racist and African American collaborators use to teach them powerlessness. Yet, take a look at how school systems are now trying to formulate a methodology to discuss the current events in Ferguson and other cities. Why control the conversation? For the same reason our children in African American venues are taught slave songs instead of empowering verse? Our dialogue needs to be controlled to include silencing, powerless training. Some HBCU institutions provide tools to exude our power, along with that the history lesson. The intelligent heed the message, the fearful and mediocre cite statistics, the European face of government, and class conscious models of respectability politics to quell their cognitive dissonance. But that dissonance also creates race-collaborators. This is also human. Fear is human.

To get you through this challenge, we need to revisit and establish in our lives how we accommodate, participate, and sometimes instigate our own demise. Here is the catch, if your town has no industry that will support your degree as well as your Africanism, there are always government positions available. And those who become a part of the machine (thinking they can make change from within), soon become THE MACHINE, despite their good intentions. Get over them … but do not give them a pass. Racist tactics are methodical complete with literature and verbal cues that African Americans are trained to absorb and respond to appropriately. Within this context, we must not forget that on an individual level, racist are confident that whatever their mistakes, there is a cue (crazy toolbox) to combat African American claims to racist attack and the victim will disregard their rights within that transaction. Add an insecure, incompetent collaborator and you have a cocktail for a now seemingly powerless victim.

I want to give you an example of using your power effectively within this context. The necessary back story is that in our region, African Americans rarely challenge the most minute situations, so racist have an exceptional comfort zone (no visible support for Trayvon Martin in public view). As the city fell into economic decline, the mayor initiated a campaign to bring a specific immigrant ethnicity to the area from New York City (I will not name the specific population; it is not about them) to purchase property and strengthen the communities. The specific ethnicity bought into the American slovenly African American stereotype for their benefit, and similar to Rwandan (Hutu/Tutsi) conflict, they assumed a position in our communities as a buffer and caste between the racist White population and the African American community. This actually occurred right after the 1994 Rwandan genocide and subsequent literature highlighting the European strategy that set the immigrant against the indigenous population (Mamdani, 2001)

While in college, I cashed my student loan checks at a local branch of the University’s banking institution, as I had done many semester previously. I approached the teller window, and handed her the check, along with my driver’s photo ID. The teller, immigrant woman, scowled at ID, turned it over, scowled again, then asked for a second form of ID. I then gave her my University photo ID bearing the same name and insignia as on the check. Her reaction was the same as with my driver’s license. She sighed and continued to scowl, leaning on her elbow on the counter, with no movement to either decline or process my transaction. I then grew impatient and asked for the bank manager. The teller was aghast. Apparently, she felt a stool in the bank afforded her power that I had no right to challenge. I reiterated, “I have no more to say to you.  It is obvious that you are not familiar with US identifications and should not hold this position. Please call the manager.” When the bank manager arrived, I informed her of the teller’s inability to read legal documents and that such deficiencies should have been addressed at her job interview. Furthermore, her behaviors may open the bank up to future lawsuits and other damages. The red-faced bank manager “shoved” the teller aside and promptly completed my transaction. By the way, said teller is now working at McDonalds. A brightly smiling young black male has taken her place on the stool.

So here is your challenge. There are two parts.

Part I: At least once per day, approach your racial encounters with power. Inner power. Victories, no matter how small, are the key to this challenge – no hubris, retaliations, pettiness, or abuses exude power or is the aim of this challenge (put away your crazy toolbox; not needed here). This can only be done if you follow principles that we ourselves will create during this adventure. There are a few listed to get you started.

  • We are human.
  • In our humanity, we fail, but as humans we are resilient and rise stronger.
  • Remember, racist gain their power in OUR acceptance of dehumanizing media, literature, slurs, and behaviors on their part.
  • We must know the laws and devices used to counter those laws that work in our benefit, during ANY transaction.
  • We must examine, in any situation, where and how we must exude our power effectively, and when racist malaise will cause them to empower YOU.
  • Recognize oppressive methodology, no matter who attempts it – these 4 indicators may help: Insult, Deny, Threaten, and Attack (these are all a part of the verbal cues). Find them in yourself first, and then you will recognize these tactics in others.
  • Act with a sound, still mind. If you become flustered, BREATHE, SING, or whatever you have to do to get back on track. It may seem crazy to the offender or allow them to feel momentarily “uber” empowered, but the whopper you will deliver will soon change that.
  • Most importantly, never, ever take your failure to control any situation as defeat. Remember, you were trained how to be powerless (regardless of how much Black literature you read or education). Regroup and fortify yourself for the next encounter, and you will recognize more of them as you learn to live as a citizen, instead of props in someone else’s theater.

Part II: You MUST develop your own strategies through these contacts and expand on these few lines with posts using the hashtag, #OYRchallenge. Your stories are important as they energize those too weak to accept this challenge. Start with the meager crumbs I have put before you and together we will create a banquet.

The alternative to this challenge is this – continue doing what you are doing expecting different results. Hence, buy a scooter to carry your crazy toolbox. It will only get heavier.

Mahmood Mamdani. When Victims Become Killers: Colonialism, Nativism, and the Genocide in Rwanda. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2001.

“Dark Girls”–A Look At Colorism and Internalized Racism In The Black Community(Full Documentary)

“Published on Oct 13, 2013
Dark Girls is a 2012 documentary film by American filmmakers Bill Duke and D. Channsin Berry. It documents colorism based on skin tone among African Americans, a subject still considered taboo by many black Americans. The film contains interviews with notable African Americans including Viola Davis. It also reports on a new version of the 1940s black doll experiment by Kenneth and Mamie Clark, which proved that black children had internalized racism by having children select a white or a black doll (they typically chose white) based on questions asked. In the updated version, black children favored light-skinned dolls over dark-skinned dolls. Dark Girls explores the many struggles, including self-esteem issues, which women of darker skin face allowing women of all ages recount “the damage done to their self-esteem and their constant feeling of being devalued and disregarded.”
Duke and Berry even take it a step farther and interview African American men who claim they could not date a woman of dark skin. One young man interviewed saying “They [dark girls] look funny beside me. The documentary takes a look into the trend of black women all over the world investing in the multibillion dollar business of skin bleaching creams. Duke and Berry also examine how black women are trying to look more Caucasian while white women are trying to look more ethnic. “White women are risking skin cancer and tanning booths twice a week, Botoxing their lips, getting butt lifts to look more ethnic and crinkling up their hair.” The film was shown to a sell-out crowd at the Pan African Film Festival in Los Angeles, April 2012. Interviewed on NPR, Duke recounted an reaction he received at another showing, which indicated that colorism is not easily discussed and was asked by someone, ‘Why are you airing our dirty laundry?’ His answer was, “Because it’s stinkin’ up the house!”
Dark Girl has been shown in many cities including Chicago, Toronto, Oakland, and Atlanta. Duke and Berry hope to “create a discussion, because in discussion there’s healing, and in silence there is suffering. Somehow if you can speak it and get it out, healing starts.” The reaction to this film had been phenomenal. Dark Girls takes a different angle by allowing real women to tell their stories of how painful the struggle of being “darker skinned” can be.”

Why Lupita Nyong’o’s Lancôme Deal Is a Victory for Women of Color – PolicyMic

Lupita Nyong'o

Lupita Nyong’o’s riveting performance in 12 Years a Slave skyrocketed the 31-year-old newcomer to the Hollywood A-list. Millions of women rejoiced at the prospect of a stunning woman of color becoming the belle of the ball, and the news that she’d been tapped by Lancôme cosmetics to be their new brand ambassador.  

via Why Lupita Nyong’o’s Lancôme Deal Is a Victory for Women of Color – PolicyMic.

Black Twitter: A virtual community ready to hashtag out a response to cultural issues – The Washington Post

If you haven’t yet experienced the glory of Black Twitter, you are late to the party. But that’s okay. You’re here now.Sip your tea, mind the shade.

Black Twitter is part cultural force, cudgel, entertainment and refuge. It is its own society within Twitter, replete with inside jokes, slang and rules, centered on the interests of young blacks online — almost a quarter of all black Internet users are on Twitter.

via Black Twitter: A virtual community ready to hashtag out a response to cultural issues – The Washington Post.