Music

How Jesse Williams Stole BET Awards With Speech on Racism | The New York Times

The most talked about experience Post-BET Awards 2016 is Jesse Williams acceptance speech for the Humanitarian Award. Black America will never forget this one.

The BET Awards Sunday featured tributes to Prince and Muhammad Ali, and a performance by Beyoncé and Kendrick Lamar. But this year, the actor Jesse Williams commanded the spotlight with an impassioned speech calling for an end to police killings, racial inequality and cultural appropriation.

Please click here to view Jesse Williams’s speech in its entirety: JW BET Awards 2016

Source: How Jesse Williams Stole BET Awards With Speech on Racism – The New York Times

Killer Mike Talks The Origins Of Hip-Hop As A Culture! | YouTube

Killer Mike On Real Time With Bill Maher

Bill Maher has the habit of placing rap artists in the idiot chair. Jay Z (video included) is a Maher favorite, yet even Jay Z grows visibly disturbed at some of the Maher character’s comments. Few, however, rise to the challenge as did Killer Mike.

Bill: “What do you say to people who link crime and violence to Hip Hop?”

The lesson began.

Published on May 16, 2015

Killer Mike rose to the challenge in the most glorious fashion possible. He educated, leaving Maher without his usual closing jab.  It is about educating liberals that championing selected causes, highlighting African American representation, familiarizing themselves with the African American discourse does not validate their “I am not a racist” card. Their slips are showing.

It is also about educating African American conservatives that Hip Hop has a history, methodology, and civil reason for being that they should embrace or quietly slink away.

Watch Killer Mike takes over Maher’s spotlight. We need more Killer Mikes.

Jay Z interview on Real Time with Bill Maher

Published on Jan 9, 2014

Why Haven’t I Seen This Ferguson Video Before? These Children Killed It! « ALTERNATIVE MEDIA SYNDICATE


“Hands up don’t shoot. We ain’t got no guns we ain’t got no drugs hands up don’t shoot.” Take a listen to Pearl Star Student, Queen McElrath, showing love and talent for Michael Brown and the people of Ferguson.

via Why Haven’t I Seen This Ferguson Video Before? These Children Killed It! « ALTERNATIVE MEDIA SYNDICATE.

3 lessons from hip-hop history every activist should know – YouTube | Jay Smooth

Published on Nov 18, 2014

This is our new bimonthly video series, The Illipsis, written, starring and produced by DJ, video essayist and cultural critic Jay Smooth.In this first episode, Jay deconstructs the history of hip-hop to illuminate how young activists can continue challenging and reshaping the status quo today.

via 3 lessons from hip-hop history every activist should know – YouTube.

The Temptations “Ball of Confusion” – YouTube

via The Temptations “Ball of Confusion” – YouTube.

Black Violin | Wil Baptiste & Kevin “Kev Marcus” Sylvester | #OYRchallenge

Classical Music meets Hip Hop: Kev Marcus of Black Violin at TEDxFIU

Black Violin is the blend of classical, hip-hop, rock, R&B, and bluegrass music. Live, they are accompanied by their crack band, featuring ace turntable whiz DJTK Dwayne Dayal and a drummer. Named one of the hottest bands at SXSW in 2013, Black Violin was invited to perform at Bonnaroo and returned to SXSW this year to SRO crowds.“Black Violin works hard, but makes it all look like play… Sometimes they play with the intense seriousness of orchestral soloists; at others they fiddle as if at a hoedown; at still others they strum the violin and viola like guitars.” New York Times

Black Violin performing “Stay With Me”

Since starting Black Violin a decade ago Wil Baptiste and Kevin “Kev Marcus” Sylvester have performed an average of 200 shows a year in 49 states and 36 countries as far away as Dubai, Prague and South Africa, while appearing at official NFL celebrations for three Super Bowls and last year’s U.S. Open in Forest Hills with Jordin Sparks. Their groundbreaking collaboration has seen them play their music for everybody from the troops in Iraq to both the official President’s Inaugural Ball and the Kids Inaugural in Washington, DC, where Barack Obama himself gave each a hearty hand-shake. Individually and together, Black Violin has collaborated with the likes of P. Diddy, Kanye West, 50 Cent, Tom Petty, Aerosmith, Aretha Franklin and The Eagles.”

Black Violin COVER: Bruno Mars “Locked Outta Heaven” + MJ “Beat It” [MASHUP]

via 15 WPMT FOX43.

Talib Kweli, Dead Prez, Cornel West speak up for Ferguson at Hip Hop 4 Justice : Entertainment

Hip hop artist perform Sunday night for Ferguson October weekend protest.

Ferghiphopconcert

Excerpt:

Hip-hop artists national and local converged on small midtown concert club Fubar on Sunday afternoon in the name of Hip Hop 4 Justice.

The event alternatively titled Hip Hop & Resistance included appearances from Talib Kweli, Dead Prez, Tef Poe, Doorway, Bo Dean, Rockwell Knuckles, T-Dubb-O, Family Affair, Nato Caliph, Scripts & Screws, Nick Menn, Rebel Diaz, Aloha Mi’sho and more.

Activist-author Cornel West, in town to keynote a mass meeting at Chaifetz Arena on Sunday night as part of the weekend of protests dubbed FergusonOctober, made a surprise appearance at Fubar, as did actor Jesse Williams of “Grey’s Anatomy,” who has been vocal about unrest in Ferguson. FergusonOctober is an organized wave of resistance calling for justice and lasting change in the wake of the shooting death of Ferguson teenager Michael Brown by police officer Darren Wilson.

via Talib Kweli, Dead Prez, Cornel West speak up for Ferguson at Hip Hop 4 Justice : Entertainment.

Tragedy and Art: The Power of Sam Cooke’s ‘A Change Is Gonna Come’ | Robert F. Darden | #OYRchallenge

This article gives background information on Sam Cooke’s motivation in creating, A Change Is Gonna Come. In the midst of the Civil Rights struggle and desegregation, our artist continued the tradition of slave hymns and field songs, ushering in hope through the darkest of times. #OYRchallenge.

On the surface, “A Change is Gonna Come” doesn’t sound particularly challenging, especially in light of the defiant freedom songs that rocked the movement in 1964, “Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me ‘Round” or “I Got My Mind Stayed on Freedom.” The song was finally released as a single in late December of that year, shortly after Cooke’s untimely death. It quickly became one of the anthems of the movement and music historian Dave Marsh said that “A Change is Gonna Come” “ranks with Martin Luther King’s best speeches as a verbal encapsulation of the changes black perspective underwent in the Sixties.”

Despite surface appearances, African-American teenagers and movement activists knew exactly what it meant. The lyrics speak of a universally understood sense of alienation in their own land, of being treated as second-class citizens, of asking for help — and not receiving it, even from their own people. And like the great protest spirituals, even when recounting the grossest injustices, the singer continually returns to the hope, the expectation of justice: “Oh, there been times that I thought I couldn’t last for long/But now I think I’m able to carry on/It’s been a long, a long time coming/But I know a change is gonna come, oh yes it will.”

via Tragedy and Art: The Power of Sam Cooke’s ‘A Change Is Gonna Come’ | Robert F. Darden.