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Nate Larson: Photographs and More – Holding That Line, Part Two

Photographer and college instructor Nate Larson captures a scene among many acts of citizenship seen in Baltimore, MD in the past few days during the Baltimore protests for the killing of Freddie Gray – the Human Wall separating protesters from police constructed by Baltimore residents.

Baltimore Human Wall during protest

Nate Larson’s HOLDING THAT LINE, PART TWO 

Earlier today, I photographed the #Baltimore protests at North Avenue & Pennsylvania Avenue with my students from #MICAphoto. I was struck by the line of police blockading the street and made a portrait of each of the 27 officers comprising the human wall.

This evening, I went back, and there were 26 citizens forming a human wall, separating the crowd from the police, for their mutual protection. My heart was heavy all day but lifted at this spirit of self-sacrifice and generosity. I made a portrait of the 22 members that gave their permission.

via Nate Larson: Photographs and More – Holding That Line, Part Two.

3 Black Adoptees Speak About Growing Up With White Parents – The Root

Rollins

The Root talked to three transracial adoptees, all adopted by white families in the 1970s, about their experiences and views on transracial adoption, as well as Costner’s new film. While all three appreciated the love and foundation their families provided, a common theme evolved: In a racially polarized society, children of color cannot be raised devoid of their history and culture. All three agreed that white families who adopt children of color need to abandon the naivete of colorblindness and deal with the racial reality their black and brown children face.

Here are their stories:

via 3 Black Adoptees Speak About Growing Up With White Parents – The Root.

Dr. Umar Johnson “The Influence of Ebonics on the Hip-Hop Culture” Ebonics Conference – YouTube


Dr. Umar Johnson “The Influence of Ebonics on the Hip-Hop Culture” Ebonics Conference

via Dr. Umar Johnson “The Influence of Ebonics on the Hip-Hop Culture” Ebonics Conference – YouTube.

7 Ways to Avoid Being Brainwashed by White Supremacy | Atlanta Blackstar

Father and son

Educate Yourself

When exercising dominion over another group, the white power structure will exert control over three branches of society: the education system, law enforcement and religion. Control is extended over the institutions which shape the human mind, body and spirit. Of course you must submit to some method of formalized education, but while you’re doing so, understand that you are being fed the system’s propaganda, giving people control over your minds whose best interest is to keep you ignorant, docile and complacent. So you must step outside the system and create your own curriculum.

via 7 Ways to Avoid Being Brainwashed by White Supremacy|Atlanta Blackstar.

Why We Can’t Wait (Signet Classics): Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. | #OYRchallenge

Why We Can’t Wait by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

mlkwhywait

Letter from Birmingham Jail, April 16, 1963

“Perhaps it is easy for those who have never felt the stinging darts of segregation to say, ‘Wait.’ But when you have seen vicious mobs lynch your mothers and fathers at will and drown your sisters and brothers at whim…when you see the vast majority of twenty million Negro brothers smothering in an airtight cage of poverty in the midst of an affluent society; when you suddenly find your tongue twisted and your speech stammering as you seek to explain to your six-year-old daughter why she can’t go to the public amusement park that has just been advertised on television, and see tears welling up in her eyes when she is told that Funtown is closed to colored children, and see ominous clouds of inferiority beginning to form in her little mental sky…when you take a cross-country drive and find it necessary to sleep night after night in the uncomfortable corners of your automobile because no motel will accept you…when…your wife and mother are never given the respected title ‘Mrs.’…when you are forever fighting a degenerating sense of ‘nobodiness’—then you will understand why we find it difficult to wait. There comes a time when the cup of endurance runs over, and men are no longer willing to be plunged into the abyss of despair.”

Why We Can’t Wait 

Martin Luther King’s Classic Exploration of the events and forces behind the Civil Rights Movement

Rams Players Enter Field With “Hands Up, Don’t Shoot” | #OYRchallenge

The NFL Rams Football players are not average citizens. They are highly visible entities in an established highly paid occupation. They risk much to take this public stand and should be commended for their bravery. They are now under attack as they suspected before making this decision. Why are they even more special? Because those with less to lose, less to benefit from silence chose silence.

St. Louis Rams players recognized this week’s Ferguson protests with an emphatic gesture during player introductions when several members of the team’s receiving corps entered the field in the “hands up, don’t shoot” pose.

Stedman Bailey, Tavon Austin, Jared Cook, Chris Givens, and Kenny Britt came out with their hands up, before being joined by the rest of the team to start the game.

via Rams Players Enter Field With “Hands Up, Don’t Shoot”.

Imagine That: When San Francisco Stopped Prosecuting Drug Users, Violent Crime Went Down | The Free Thought Project


ReasonTV

An interview with San Francisco police chief Greg Suhr.

“I’m a narc. I’ve been a narcotics guy forever,” says San Francisco police chief Greg Suhr. “But I’m just telling you, I’ve always felt bad for the people that were addicted to drugs.”

Suhr is following in the footsteps of his predecessor, George Gascon, who is now District Attorney in the city and who began the process of de-emphasizing drug enforcement in the midst of cutbacks to the police force in the wake of the 2007 recession. Since Suhr has taken over, he’s disbanded most of the force’s narcotics unit, and drug arrests have plummeted by 85 percent.

via Imagine That: When San Francisco Stopped Prosecuting Drug Users, Violent Crime Went Down | The Free Thought Project.

Killer cops, drone wars and the crisis of democracy – Salon.com

2014 violence

Racism and its close cousin xenophobia are ingredients baked into the slave morality that afflicts so many white Americans, feeding a persecution complex and a sense of permanent aggrievement among the most historically privileged demographic group on the planet. (Yes, there are millions of poor whites, and they have good reason to lament their marginal, forgotten status. They also have a strong tendency to look for enemies in the wrong places.) Crime is at or near all-time lows, employment is high, many consumer goods are cheaper than ever before and the United States has not experienced a major attack by foreign terrorists in 13 years. Given all that, it is crucial to conceal the real source of middle-class and working-class America’s worsening anomie: the vast gulf of inequality between the super-rich and the rest of us, along with the stagnant wages, declining benefits and longer work weeks confronted by ordinary people.

As the black radical philosopher Frantz Fanon observed in the early 1960s, racism becomes a tool in the hands of the masters, used to pit different sectors of the oppressed against each other. He was talking about the European working class and its reluctance to join forces with the anti-colonial struggle in Africa, but we face a version of the same problem today. This week I watched an eerie and powerful new collage film from Swedish documentarian Göran Hugo Olsson called “Concerning Violence,” which is inspired by Fanon’s revolutionary classic “The Wretched of the Earth” (a book not as far away from Nietzsche as you might suppose). The film is an essayistic and aphoristic assemblage of archival footage from the ‘60s, ‘70s and ‘80s, opening a window onto various episodes from that little-understood and profoundly important period of post-colonial and anti-colonial history in Africa. But it also struck me as a distorted mirror reflecting our own situation, which has elements of internal colonialism (with respect to the poorest elements of our population), and an external neo-colonialism, although held at a great distance and largely invisible.

via Killer cops, drone wars and the crisis of democracy – Salon.com.

The Illipsis: on Ferguson, riots and human limits – YouTube | #OYRchallenge

Published on Nov 26, 2014

In this second installment of The Illipsis, Jay Smooth looks back at the week’s events in Ferguson and asks how we can truly apply Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr’s advice that “riots are the language of the unheard.”

via The Illipsis: on Ferguson, riots and human limits – YouTube.

Ferguson Speaks: A Communique From Ferguson on Vimeo | #handsup | #OYRchallenge

Ferguson Speaks: A Communique From Ferguson from FitzGibbon Media on Vimeo.#FergusonSpeaks

As law enforcement officials and national media gear up for a St Louis County Grand Jury’s announcement as to whether it will levy charges against Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson for the August 9th shooting of Michael Brown Jr., activists have issued a 9 minute video communiqué providing an intimate look at the climate on the ground.

The video communiqué displays a cross section of the myriad groups activated in the region and includes exclusive footage of Vonderrit Meyers Sr., Ferguson Mayor James Knowles III, celebrated artist and HandsUpUnited.org cofounder Tef Poe, Taurean Russell, Lost Voices organizer Low Key, Millennial Activists United co-creator Ashley Yates, activist and Grey’s Anatomy star Jesse Williams, Damon Davis — a volunteer with The Don’t Shoot Coalition, Canfield Watchmen founder David Whitt, as well as local Ferguson business managers.Viewers are encouraged to tweet, share, and embed the video using the accompanying hashtag #FergusonSpeaks —extended raw clips of each of the video’s subjects are available upon request.handsupunited.org

via Ferguson Speaks: A Communique From Ferguson on Vimeo.