Author: habariganiamerica

Habari Gani, America! finds your news, discussions, photos, and videos that captures the temperament of the African and the flavor of our sweat.

50 Years After the Moynihan Report, Examining the Black Family in the Age of Mass Incarceration |The Atlantic

Staff writer, author, and activist TA-NEHISI COATES  on “The Black Family in the Age of Mass Incarceration

Never marry again in slavery. — Margaret Garner, 1858

Wherever the law is, crime can be found. — Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, 1973

“lower-class behavior in our cities is shaking them apart.”

By his own lights, Daniel Patrick Moynihan, ambassador, senator, sociologist, and itinerant American intellectual, was the product of a broken home and a pathological family. He was born in 1927 in Tulsa, Oklahoma, but raised mostly in New York City. When Moynihan was 10 years old, his father, John, left the family, plunging it into poverty. Moynihan’s mother, Margaret, remarried, had another child, divorced, moved to Indiana to stay with relatives, then returned to New York, where she worked as a nurse. Moynihan’s childhood—a tangle of poverty, remarriage, relocation, and single motherhood—contrasted starkly with the idyllic American family life he would later extol. “My relations are obviously those of divided allegiance,” Moynihan wrote in a diary he kept during the 1950s. “Apparently I loved the old man very much yet had to take sides … choosing mom in spite of loving pop.” In the same journal, Moynihan, subjecting himself to the sort of analysis to which he would soon subject others, wrote, “Both my mother and father—They let me down badly … I find through the years this enormous emotional attachment to Father substitutes—of whom the least rejection was cause for untold agonies—the only answer is that I have repressed my feelings towards dad.”

Source: 50 Years After the Moynihan Report, Examining the Black Family in the Age of Mass Incarceration – The Atlantic

The Fallout of Brexit: An Omnimous Future for the UK

Dr. Watson Scott Swail, President & CEO, Educational Policy Institute on Brexit

The Swail Letter on Higher Education

Dr. Watson Scott Swail, President & CEO, Educational Policy Institute

After a long night, the results are in and the world woke up surprised. The United Kingdom voted to leave the European Union after 43 years of membership, shaking global economic markets and the financial stability of the UK. The “leave” campaign endured by a vote of 51.9 percent to 48.1 percent, in a surprising reverse of what polls suggested in the days leading up to this, only the third referendum in the history of the UK.

The impact of leaving the EU will be enormous and has already begun. By this morning, Prime Minister David Cameron announced his resignation, giving additional instability to weak Parliament. Northern Ireland is already murmuring about the possibility of joining the Republic of Ireland to keep in the EU, and Scotland, which overwhelmingly voted to remain, is already in talks of a new referendum…

View original post 543 more words

Howard University Commencement 2016

Click on this link for the LIVE presentation. http://player.piksel.com/s/n131asj0

WHUR 96.3 FM in collaboration with WHUT broadcast via live web stream the 2016 Howard University Commencement Convocation with President Barack Obama delivering the keynote address.

Source: Howard University Commencement 2016

U.N. Experts Seem Horrified By How American Schools Treat Black Children

The United Nations in their assessment of United States schools found us guilty of the mistreatment of African American students. Why do I say us, many African Americans may posit? Beyond physical and mental abuses, this article also points to the updates in our texts books that cast slavery into the context of the American history of immigrants. African American parents are present while history is rewritten to soften any future systemic abuses suffered upon their descendants, yet we remain mute.  Read an excerpt below.

Controversy surrounding the way schools teach about the history of slavery also spiked in October, after a Texas mother discovered that her child’s textbook described slaves as “workers” in a section about immigration. “It talked about the U.S.A. being a country of immigration, but mentioning the slave trade in terms of immigration was just off,” Roni Dean-Burren, who documented her offense in social media posts that went viral, told The New York Times. “It’s that nuance of language. This is what erasure looks like.”

Source: U.N. Experts Seem Horrified By How American Schools Treat Black Children

On – Melissa Harris-Perry’s mistake was that she didn’t “own her masters” | Blavity

Our greatest frailty – pimping someone else’s ride. Whether you have a booth in a flea market or a record label – own it. The prevailing dialogue for the weak, especially during the economic downturn has been jobs. But between the rhetoric has been the plea for Americans to become what they once were – creators, builders, and owners. “… the importance of legally owning your work” has never become more important for especially minorities.
The greatest shame to me is that Melissa Harris Perry bit into the same poison fruit that most of our relish. We have been trained to pimp the master’s ride and be glad – even boast because we are riding in the front seat.
Oprah Winfrey owned a portion of and eventually all of what she helped to create during her decades-long run on ‘Oprah.’ She turned its success into the OWN network. The co-founder of Blavity, Morgan Debaun, OWNS this site and everything that happens to it. Alexa von Tobel, founder of LearnVest.com OWNED her product and sold it for $250 million.
The poorest African American should have learned going to the corner store and supporting people who do not look like or respect us, – the power of ownership. But access is access we say. For the 20th century – yes. For the 21st Century – no. We should pledge that from now on, every job should lead to ownership.

Source: Melissa Harris-Perry’s mistake was that she didn’t “own her masters” –

The Anger of Ta-Nehisi Coates by Darryl Pinckney | The New York Review of Books

Between the World and Me by Ta-Nehisi Coates 

Coates says that it took him a while to realize how different his family was. They boycotted Thanksgiving, and fasted instead. Most of his friends were fatherless, around him the young were getting locked up, dying of gunshots, and crack brought the end of the world. His father’s Afrocentric publishing business succeeded somewhat, but he also did what he had to, including beekeeping. He held on to jobs as a janitor at Morgan State, a black college, and as a research librarian at Howard University, some ways away in Washington, D.C., just so his children could have free tuition. “What did I know, what did I know/of love’s austere and lonely offices?” Robert Hayden asks himself in his poem about his father, “Those Winter Sundays.” But Coates dedicates The Beautiful Struggle to his mother. His father had a few children by other women. One year he became a father by two women at the same time.

Source: The Anger of Ta-Nehisi Coates by Darryl Pinckney | The New York Review of Books

7 Toxic Assaults on Communities of Color Besides Flint: The Dirty Racial Politics of Pollution | Alternet

[Dr. Robert D. Bullard]  says the politics of environmental racism haven’t changed since economist William J. Kruvant described the process in a 1975 journal article: “Disadvantaged people are largely victims of middle- and upper-class pollution because they usually live closest to the sources of pollution—power plants, industrial installations, and in central cities where vehicle traffic is heaviest. Usually they have no choice. Discrimination created the situation, and those with wealth and influence have political power to keep polluting facilities away from their homes. Living in poverty areas is bad enough. High pollution makes it worse.”

Source: 7 Toxic Assaults on Communities of Color Besides Flint: The Dirty Racial Politics of Pollution | Alternet

The Productivity Robbing Myths of Grad School

SAS Confidential

Author: Steve Shaw
Original: How Not To Suck at Grad School


I am not sure if there is a best way to be efficient and productive as there are many very different, but positive, ways to work. However, there are some common and universally terrible ways to work. Here are a few things that I hear students say with pride that are actually signs of an inefficient worker.

“I do my best work at the last minute. I thrive under pressure.”

–No. The first draft of everything is terrible, even for the best writer. You may be an extremely good binge writer, but I promise that the work will be better with another draft and some time to consider and change content.  Plan your time well. The draft of any project should be completed three days to two weeks before it is due. The remainder of the time can be…

View original post 1,081 more words

#MLKNOW Brings Out Chris Rock, Harry Belafonte, & More To Honor MLK | News One

2016 MLK Now

Blackout for Human Rights, Riverside Church

Click on the Link Below for the performances in the entirety.

Blackout for Human Rights and The Campaign for Black Male Achievement

On the week that would have marked the late leader’s 87th birthday, social justice groups Blackout for Human Rights and The Campaign for Black Male Achievement celebrated Dr. King’s legacy and more with MLK Now at the legendary Riverside Church in Harlem, New York. Monday night’s event highlighted historic speeches by civil rights heroes like MLK, Malcolm X, Fred Hampton, Sojourner Truth, and Shirley Chisholm, recited by Lin Miranda-Manuel, Andre Holland, Michael B. Jordan, Octavia Spencer, and civil rights icon Harry Belafonte.

Source: #MLKNOW Brings Out Chris Rock, Harry Belafonte, & More To Honor MLK | News One