‘The Teacher Wars’ Author Talks Race and Gender in American Education – COLORLINES | #OYRchallenge

Scholars interested in this book may also want to research the 1960s and 70s NY policy; “live in your work community,” where NY police and teachers are still given incentives on home purchases and other amenities within the inner city communities where they are employed. This was hoped to address the timely complaint by African American community leaders that African American communities should be served by teachers and police officers of their culture. It was partially successful. Also, look up the JDL response through Brooklyn’s Union College. This is one history, Dana Goldstein would not, could not dare include in Her history. Interesting story regardless.Race and Education

What surprised you most about the history of race and education?One of the really big things that surprised me was that the roots of this “no excuses” reform ideology that is so popular today was actually in black educational theories and ideas dating back to the 19th century. We often mischaracterize those movements today as something that white people are imposing on communities of color. Yet what I found is that in the ideas of Anna Julia Cooper, Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. Du Bois—figures who disagreed with each other on a lot of things and had a fertile debate—[valued] “no excuses,” strict discipline and academic rigor. Those things were, to a certain extent, areas of agreement among black educational leaders.You can quite easily trace how the founders of the “no excuses” movement, for example the founders of the KIPP network of charter schools, Mike Feinberg and Dave Levin [who are both white], were explicitly influenced by a female black teacher who they observed using these “no excuses” strategies. And there is a translation process that happens there, where this set of ideas of was mostly being used by teachers of color with children of color. Now a multi-racial group of teachers is using these strategies. When someone from your community says to you, “Look, there are no excuses,” that is very different from when someone from outside your community is telling you “no excuses.” Although these are very old ideas, what they mean in practice today is has changed.

via ‘The Teacher Wars’ Author Talks Race and Gender in American Education – COLORLINES.

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